Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently using a fork mount rack with my hardtail v-brake bike. A new full suspension disc brake bike is on the way. Is it much more hassel taking the front wheel on and off a disk brake bike? Just curious if I'll be able to throw it on, give it a quick spin check and ride. Right now I'm planning on going with Magura Marta's if that helps any.

Thanks in advance,
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
It's not any harder to take the wheel on and off, you'll just need a couple times to get used to sliding the disc into the caliper.

Depending on what type of fork you have and maybe some other unknown factors, you may have to rotate your axle a little bit when you put the wheel on to make sure everything is lined up to keep the disc from rubbing. I had this problem for a while with my Deore hydros / low end Marz set up but it went away when I switched to a Fox fork. I've heard of just a couple other people that had the same problem and it sounds pretty uncommon so I wouldn't worry about it yet.
 

·
Large wheels & one gear
Joined
·
720 Posts
You should notice it being a little bit quicker than with the V-brake. I have had a few instances where my brake would rub after putting the front wheel on. I found that when that would happen, I was tightening the quick release with the bike angled and I was in a hurry.
 

·
Muskoka
Joined
·
3,482 Posts
Plastic Spacer

Two other differences. You should have one of those plastic spacers that clips into the caliper to prevent the pads from accidently closing while your disc is not in the caliper. Any bike shop should give you one - assuming you don't get one with the bike. Also not all fork mount trays are disc brake compatible. I know the the Yakima Viper is, that's the one I have. But some of the other designs are not.
 

·
Your bike is incorrigible
Joined
·
3,179 Posts
that's a good question

In my experience, taking the wheel off and then putting it back on shifts the alignment ever so slightly so that there is a little rub. It's just important to get the wheel down in the dropouts completely when setting up the brakes, and then you need to make sure you get it down at the bottom of the dropouts ever time you put the wheel back on. Yeah, this sounds like it's obvious, but there is less margin for error with discs than with Vs. And also watch out that the calipers don't close while the wheel is removed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
The tray may interfere with the caliper. If you're using a RockyMount rack, they have a $10 bolt on adapter. With another rack, you might get around this by turning the fork 180d to mount.
 

·
Don't touch me!
Joined
·
775 Posts
If the pads contact eachother, that is usually a bad thing. Your pads won't get damaged, but air can get into the system and affect performance; you might also lose fluid.

The pastic spacer is used so the pistons don't move out. It prevents the inevitable lever-pull-when-your-front-wheel- is-out-of-the-dropouts curse fest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
DiRt DeViL said:
If your tray makes contact with your caliper just remember, the dremel is your friend.
The hammer and wrench were my friends. :rolleyes:

The only problem I've encountered after pulling the brake lever with the wheel off was that I had to use a small screwdriver to push the pads apart before I could put the wheel back on. I've never seen anyone use the plastic spacer for anything before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,094 Posts
fortunms said:
Whats the deal if the pads come together, will this damage the pads?
no, but have fun getting ur disk to slide in between pads that are touching. just don't grab the brake lever with the wheel and you'll have no problems. they are harder to open up if you have hydrulic brakes
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top