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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can a Dirt Jumping frame be used for XC riding? Will the bike handle different? Any input welcome....

thx
 

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Short answer: yes.

Long answer: it works really well for most situations, climbing isn't one of them. My jumper is about a 15" frame where my XC bike is a 19", and on my jumper I don't get full leg extension and the seattube is pretty slack so the pedaling efficiency isn't the best. Plus the damn thing is really heavy. That aside, my bike in particular handles really well on the trail and makes a really playful ride being able to hip up on little rises or easily jump over trail obstacles. Get some knobbies and try it, my jumper is not a very aggressive jump bike, I think it's more considered a slack hardtail that is used for jumping. If you're running something like an Eastern Nighttrain, then you may have some problems fitting knobbies on there in the first place.
 

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totally depends on the dirt jumper and how tall you are, there's a lot of variety in design but not many sizes. Yes, it will handle different.
 

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It's doable, but it's just not the best bike for that kind of riding. The frame, fork, wheels, will all be much heavier than you need. The geometry won't be great, but you can get used to it. DJ forks tend to not perform that well on trails. The biggest issue tends to be the inability to get leg extension (as zebrahum mentioned). I'd need over a foot of seatpost showing to even come close to my XC leg extension, and I'm not comfortable riding trails with the seatpost extended that far. I play with mine on my local trails occasionally, but I pretty much do the whole ride standing up. It can be fun once in a while, but I have several XC bikes for my main trail riding.
My DJ bike is a 12-inch frame and I usually ride 18-19.5 XC frames, so it's a huge difference. Something in the 14" to 16" frame size (seat tube length) would work better, but if you're really into DJs, you may not like a 16" frame.
 

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trailville said:
I'd need over a foot of seatpost showing to even come close to my XC leg extension, and I'm not comfortable riding trails with the seatpost extended that far.
It must be nice to be short. :mad:
 

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Yes it can be used for XC riding and yes it's different.
For a start the head angle is different so the steering won't feels as nimble as an XC bike.
I had a 17" XC bike (well it was my Husbands really but he never rode so I had to give it a bit of love from time to time) anyway I got myself a dirt jump type bike because I wanted sometheing versatile that I could ride XC and also try DH with.
The main difference I instantly noticed going from the XC bike to the Dirt Jumper is that the cranks seemed to be further back, they just didn't feel like they were in the right position for efficient pedalling, but probably more so that it just felt different to what I was used to. If it wasn't the cranks then maybe I was just noticing the different seat angle.

Depending how tall you are you may need a really long seat post, which may possibly mean that you can't slam it right down when you want to dirt jumping (unless you have two post / saddle combos). I'm 5'7 so a 350mm post is plenty long for me on the 13.5" Giant STP.

So I think a DJ bike will just be heavier, less nimble and not optimal if you're really into the long XC rides, but in some regards it's what you get used to isn't it, after a while when you get used to the bike it may not be an issue, unless you're a larger person and you're too cramped etc etc, if you're a smaller person well it could turn out to be ideal.

Funny thing is that DJ bikes are supposedly built to be "manualling machines" with the super short chainstays etc etc, but I always found that the XC bike (Giant Alias which had similar geo to the XTC) was way easier to lift the front wheel on, I imagine this was because it also had short chainstays but a steeper head angle than the STP as well.

So why are you looking at getting a Dirt Jumper for XC?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks for all the responses.....
 

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ducktape said:
Yes it can be used for XC riding and yes it's different.
For a start the head angle is different so the steering won't feels as nimble as an XC bike.
I had a 17" XC bike (well it was my Husbands really but he never rode so I had to give it a bit of love from time to time) anyway I got myself a dirt jump type bike because I wanted sometheing versatile that I could ride XC and also try DH with.
The main difference I instantly noticed going from the XC bike to the Dirt Jumper is that the cranks seemed to be further back, they just didn't feel like they were in the right position for efficient pedalling, but probably more so that it just felt different to what I was used to. If it wasn't the cranks then maybe I was just noticing the different seat angle.

Depending how tall you are you may need a really long seat post, which may possibly mean that you can't slam it right down when you want to dirt jumping (unless you have two post / saddle combos). I'm 5'7 so a 350mm post is plenty long for me on the 13.5" Giant STP.

So I think a DJ bike will just be heavier, less nimble and not optimal if you're really into the long XC rides, but in some regards it's what you get used to isn't it, after a while when you get used to the bike it may not be an issue, unless you're a larger person and you're too cramped etc etc, if you're a smaller person well it could turn out to be ideal.

Funny thing is that DJ bikes are supposedly built to be "manualling machines" with the super short chainstays etc etc, but I always found that the XC bike (Giant Alias which had similar geo to the XTC) was way easier to lift the front wheel on, I imagine this was because it also had short chainstays but a steeper head angle than the STP as well.

So why are you looking at getting a Dirt Jumper for XC?
wouldn't steering be more nimble with a steeper head angle and shorter fork?
 

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Yes that's correct, steering would be more nimble with a steeper head angle and shorter fork. Sorry my thinking is the likes of a Giant STP where it comes with a 100mm fork and has a 69deg HA, which is slacker than an XC bike that might come with a similar length fork.
But yes lower the fork to 80mm and then you have a 70deg Head Angle which is closer to XC geometry.

In fact my STP is set up with 80mm of travel at the moment, I'm seeing how I like that, but my other bike is an Orange 222 which is a very different beast so the STP would feel nimble to me no matter what! BTW I'm selling the Orange and keeping the STP because it's just such a versatile steed.
 

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Think about it this way.....try to ride XC on a BMX! Thats basiclly what a DJ bike is with 26" wheels. Thats what the geo is set up for.
 

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ae111black said:
Think about it this way.....try to ride XC on a BMX! Thats basiclly what a DJ bike is with 26" wheels. Thats what the geo is set up for.
LOL I like it:D I think to an extent it's true.

However two big differences are that my DJ bike has 1x9 gearing and the saddle can go to XC heights, yeah the bike looks sexxier when the saddle is slammed though.

I don't know is a DJ bike a smaller more compact version of a MTB or is it a big version of a BMX? Bit of both perhaps.

I know that Giant isn't selling the STP in Australia this year, most people who are into dirt jumping / park etc are buying BMXes rather than DJ Hardtails it seems, and I know if I wanted a bike purely for dirt jumping and park riding I reckon I would get a BMX too.

You know that brings me to a point, for whatever price you're looking at spending on a DJ Hardtail, you could probably buy an entry level XC bike and a half decent BMX:thumbsup:
 

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dont know about you but im too big for a bmx bike. and most of the DJ's i know ride 26" and havent used 20" wheels in a while
 

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all i know is that the ETT and HA of my dj bike are the same as my trail bike. only difference is a smaller fork and seat tube. it works fine for me.
 

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The STP is mine, 22" top tube, 80mm travel fork.
The BMX is my 7yr old sons, 20.25" top tube.
I'm not really talented at any kind of riding. I've had a go on both bikes at the skate park, the STP is more forgiving due to the front suspension and I'm more used to it's handling, but apart from that both bikes feel about the same, like they would do the job as well as each other.
I can certainly understand why bigger guys would go towards the 26" DJ bikes rather than BMX although these days more people are buying the 24" wheel ones aren't they?

I was tempted to sell up all my bikes and get a bmx, but the problem with bmx is that it's just not very good for general riding or commutes or say a bit of downhill, I decided I wanted some flexibility even though I don't ride a great deal at the moment.

If you purchased one of each, I don't think you'd get a DJ hardtail, you'd go for an XC hardtail and a BMX, there isn't really much point to having the two bikes below both for the same thing is there?

 
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