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MTBR Demi-God
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!

I just purchased a 06' Trek 4900 from my lbs. They charged me 500 dollars for the bike. Here are the specs:

Frame: Aluminum
Fork: Rockshox Judy
Rear Derailleur: Shimano LX (8 speed)
Front Derailleur: Acera
Shifters: Shimano Deore
Brakes: Shimano LX Hydraulics 160mm rotors
Handlebar: Bontrager Sport
Pedals: Shimano M324 Clipless

Do you think this is a decent enough bike for a guy who is just getting into mountain biking? Did I get ripped off?

Should I be performing any upgrades on the bike?

Thanks a lot guys!
 

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Freshly Fujified
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8,199 Posts
Very nice bike

Was this a used biike or a new leftover? very nicely spec'd. The only thing I would upgrade is the fork. The rest seems very nice and the prices is excellent, even if used.

Bob
 

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Old man on a bike
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Great beginner bike. You might want to change the fork out but I'd ride it first, you might like it. Now put those miles and smiles in!
 

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person
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I got a 4500 a couple years back that wasn't spec'd out that nice, and I paid more Sighs::
great pruchase tho....but yea down the line the fork will need an upgrade, thats about it
 

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Not sure exactly what crank they put in the 4900 but I bet that will need replacement in the future if it's like most trek cranksets and BB's.

The 4900's are no longer being produced so you bought the last year they'll ever be made.

They still make the 4500's but you can't get them in disc in 07 and looking forward.
What's weird is the 4300's come with disc brakes in 07.

THE ONLY thing about your purchase is the fact that the 6000's (new line for 07 and is the replacement for many other lines like the 4900's for example) are only $100 more ($600), come with even better parts then your 4900 and it even comes with the SLR frame instead of the SL frame.

If it makes you feel any better I have a 06 4300 with NO disc brakes and it costed me $360. On my 4300 I have to replace the fork, crankset/BB and front derailer and I won't even have disc brakes. You're sitting better then alot of people lets just say.
 

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MTBR Demi-God
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, It is new

Yes, the bike is new, never used apart from test rides in the parking lot. I guess I need to change the fork after sometime.... but for now, it really feels good. Already took it to the trails, and it perfomed well beyond my expectations.

Im in no hurry to get an expensive full suspension just yet, but I do want this bike to stick around for 3 years... if it does, its done its job...

Thanks a lot for the replies!

Got any specific brand of fork that you would recommend?
 

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anirban said:
Yes, the bike is new, never used apart from test rides in the parking lot. I guess I need to change the fork after sometime.... but for now, it really feels good. Already took it to the trails, and it perfomed well beyond my expectations.

Im in no hurry to get an expensive full suspension just yet, but I do want this bike to stick around for 3 years... if it does, its done its job...

Thanks a lot for the replies!

Got any specific brand of fork that you would recommend?
Rockshox. Others might say Marzocchi, but I like RS. Maybe a recon, I think that's the inexpensive one. Like the others said though, ride it till it breaks, then replace the fork.
 

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MTBR Demi-God
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Front Derailleur

I was told by one of my friends that the front derailleur (Shimano Acera) is not something I would like to have. He is suggesting me to upgrade to a better component, somewhere along the lines of LX or XT.

What do you guys say?
 

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Bike to the Bone...
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8,290 Posts
anirban said:
I was told by one of my friends that the front derailleur (Shimano Acera) is not something I would like to have. He is suggesting me to upgrade to a better component, somewhere along the lines of LX or XT.

What do you guys say?
Don't change anything until it breaks, specially drivetrain issues. My first bike had a way lower front deraileur, and it's still working well.

I would say ride your bike as is until something breaks, and then replace it. Take good care of it. clean it, lube it, make sure everything is working fine, take it after a month or so to the LBS for a tune up (it's just for the first time).

Maybe it doesn't have the best fork, but I think it will work well for a time.
 

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rzozaya1969 said:
Don't change anything until it breaks, specially drivetrain issues. My first bike had a way lower front deraileur, and it's still working well.
I agree wholeheartedly. Yeah Acera is a low-end shimano, but I rode an Acera front derailleur for 5 years with no problems. Don't worry about upgrading, if you hang out too much on these forums (or read too many magazines) you'll find yourself tempted to install a $400 fork on a $500 bike... Will that $400 fork be better? certainly. But you could also wait 3 years and put $1200 into a new bike rather than dump $400/year into your current bike (which will do the job just fine)...


PS, you did get a very nice deal
 

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Take the bike out and ride it. The first and best upgrade to your bicycling will be your own personal skillset. When stuff breaks, then upgrade it with newer stuff, but for now just ride the thing. You and I probably wouldn't notice much difference between components anyway till we start riding a little harder and faster.

Go to your local trail and sit trailside at a difficult section and watch the riders that come through. Some guys will come through pretty slow, some will come through at your pace, some faster and then you'll see some super fast guys hauling butt. Those fast guys will take advantage of the faster components, but probably not you or I. Go out and build your skills, then worry about getting better components.
 

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I agree with these guys, don't replace anything until something breaks esp with that bike.

Your front derailure is usually the least important thing you want "high end" but if it starts to give you issue even after a few adjustments over time just get a deore front derailure for $35 at the place u bought the bike,they should put it in for free.

I have a step down from yours and I'm on my final adjustment with it. If it gets whacked out one more time I'm throwing that deore in it.

The alivio shimano line (a step down from deore) is trail worthy stuff also for a bit less, but it's the lowest I'd go for decent trail use.
 

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Probably drunk right now
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^^^^I'm with them^^^^

anirban said:
I was told by one of my friends that the front derailleur (Shimano Acera) is not something I would like to have. He is suggesting me to upgrade to a better component, somewhere along the lines of LX or XT.

What do you guys say?
Don't upgrade anything until it breaks. There's no point.

Regarding a fork: Marzocchi makes a great product.

Ken
 

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MTBR Demi-God
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
sorry double post!
 

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MTBR Demi-God
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks a lot guys for all of your input!

I just want to make sure that this bike will hold up when i hit the trails. I dont want to drag everyone down just because my bike is not upto the task of basic trail riding... I will be dragging them down enough with my cautious, slow riding to begin with...

Right now, I have only done road riding/commuting on it, and its simply beautiful!

But Im assured that this bike will perform decent enough on the trails... thanks to you all!
 

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I bought a GF Marlin for $450 and it doesn't have the disc brakes or the lx rear derailer. I have beat on it for four months including a muddy race and it has held up well. Good purchase. Now go ride!:thumbsup:
 

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In my opinion, so far, most people want a deore or higher rear derailler so when they are out on the trails, their kind of riding wont snap the derailler etc.

Now the front derailler, does not come into contact into as much stuff as the rear. I dont have first hand experience, but im pretty sure this is the case.
 

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MTB Withdrawal
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Lucky.

That's an awesome setup. I could have paid 500 for my current bike (it was on sale for 320), and it's a hardtail that weighs 35 pounds, has okish discs (I swapped them for Hayes MX1's), and has an Acera drivetrain (w/ a C050 front deraileur!!!).

You got LX, Deore Shifters, and LX hydros???? Wow.

Go ride.
 
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