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Any insulin dependent riders in this forum ?

Medtronic pump here on my end, excellent control, a1c is 6.0 :thumbsup:

I have suffered from hypoglycemic episodes that required a trip to ER two times. Learned that test, test, and more test is the answer to keep tabs on my glucose levels. One of these days, my medical insurance will cover a "real time" meter/sensor type pump.

Purchased a Rockhopper Com Pro three weeks ago, newbie at the MTB scene. Semi nervous about riding solo on remote trails. Ya, I know a riding buddy, but I'm a lone wolf by nature. :madmax:

Suggestions, tips, web sites, etc., are all welcome. I absolutely refuse to stop living because of my illness.

diabetes sucks, ___ but I have learned to manage it well.

Gary
Williamsport,PA
 

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Good for you for getting a bike and taking charge of your diabetes. I've been Type 2 for almost 2 years now, and biking is a great way to batlle the disease. I can't help you much since I don't take insulin, but hopefully some others can chime in and assist.

One thing I can suggest is to carry some gels in case you go low, test (during the ride) and get a Road ID http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx that identifies yourself, emergency contacts, and that you are a diabetic.

Everyone is different so you'll just need to experiment and learn how your blood sugar reacts and how you need deal with it. I don't let it interfere with my life anymore and in reality it has made me live healthier and more aware of my body.

Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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I'm 59, was diagnosed at age 50. My case is a bit unusual - I'm type1, insulin dependent. Sort of a late bloomer.

I test before I ride, making sure I'm 120+ going out. I test during the ride as well. I carry glucose tabs, gels and other snacks.

This summer I got a Dexcom continuous glucose meter. While not reliably accurate, it's helpful, and especially good for trending and rate of change.

I find my glucose requirements go down for a couple of days after a kick-a$$ ride. Makes those muscles hungry.

My ability to absorb sugar and my insulin needs vary a lot, depending on exercise, how I'm feeling, position of the stars. Like you say - test, test and test. Keeping after it is the way to live long. And kicking the mountain's a$$ does it too. ;)
 

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My g/f has type one and she has to test often, be sure to carry ur kits(glucagon) and its prob best not to ride alone. I got her a bike for xmas(gt arrowhead ht) and she was on edge about her sugars and riding, so we go for short rides(10mins) and she carry's a few different energy bars than contain sugar just in case. Her sugar will drop a bit on our short rides. Testing seems to be the key for her or if she gets tired we stop and rest till she is ready. Think ahead and riding should do anyone well and prob help keep it under control.:)
 

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I'm type 2 myself, and I lean toward the hypoglycemic side of things. I don't spike much, but I do drop like a rock occasionally. Fortunately it's not bad enough for insulin, yet. Will be eventually. The other guys are right. Do your daily routine, carry a meter and a few strips, if you take any other meds get a watertight pill container and keep a couple of doses on you all the time. Don't go nuts on sugary snacks, that won't do any good for you.........pretty much the obvious. I also suggest a riding buddy, or at least stick to a popular trail. Yeah, it'll suck a bit stopping to get out of the way of faster riders, trail wear, all the stuff that comes with well-used trails, but at least you know there's a darn good chance you'll be found pretty quickly. Don't try night riding without a partner, but that goes for anybody, not just us diabetics. Never hurts to carry a cell phone, use the old ICE trick. Put whoever needs to be contacted in an emergency under that listing........the majority of paramedics and rescue workers are trained to look for that. And I assume you wear a bracelet..........if not, DO. List all medications, doctors, all that stuff. The last thing you need is some rescue guy giving you a shot of something in the ambulance that will make you worse instead of better. I do that for other medical reasons, I'm on a few meds that will cause some nasty reactions if the medical team doesn't know about them. I'd probably keep a log for awhile, just simple stuff like mileage, approximate elevation gain, difficulty level, how you feel after each ride, and show it to your doc at appointments. He'll tell you if you're going too far too fast.

Other than that, just find your limit, and push it gradually. Don't go crazy trying to be the best hillclimber. Ride, have fun, and be safe. S'all there is to it.
 

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My son is Type 1 and just recently got the Medtronic pump. We've been riding together for years and what we did was bulk up before and drink sports drinks during the ride. When we first started ( he was riding before he was diagnosed), we checked every 15-20 minutes during the ride. With the sports drinks, his numbers were near perfect while riding. As our confidence grew, the checks diminished and we'd ride for hours without checking. Never had a problem in 4 years. Watch yourself for a couple of hours AFTER the ride.

OH yeah, don't keep it a secret. Lone wolf or no, I'd suggest riding partners for a while if you can. At least until you know how you're going to handle riding. Let all your riding friends know what to look for.

By the way, nice a1c. My son is a little higher (about 7) but it's probably because of all the intentional bulking up.
 

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Type II diabetic myself, 6'3 and dropped weight from 312 lbs on Dec 4th to 244lbs as of last week. Worked myself off all Insulin and pills since Feb 8th. Big issue was the initial rapid weight loss requiring medication dosage adjustment about every 72 hours during the first couple of months. about every 5-7 pounds a needed to reduce. A1C is between 5.3 - 5-5 over the last six months since coming off medications.

Using livestrong.com to record my meter, food, and exercises. Great site they started MyPlate-D for diabetics.

Picked up a vintage MTB abotu two weeks ago using it as a commuter and overall round town ride, plan on dropping another 20 pounds and then get a nice bike for tours and such, but keep this as my daily ride.

I find I need to check my glucose levels about every 20 minutes and I may need a snack, I pack.

Gu Gel
Glucose Tablets
Trail Mix bars
Gummie bears

Along with a good first aid pouch in my Camelbak HAWG.

I work out up to 3 hours a day at times with swimming, cycling, running, weights I end up with a 1500-2500 calories burn. A word of caution about whey protein, I stay away from it, it increases acidic levels and is hard on the kidneys.

Going to do the Tour De Cure next year, I just missed this years run. Training to get my Red Rider jersey next spring. Hoooah!!!

I use O'Neils law, which is 'Murphy was an Optimist", so I usually wear cargo paints / shorts. meter in the left pocket, cell phone in the right, Medical ID and heart rate monitor left wrist, 550 para-cord bracelet on the right wrist. Camelbak 100 oz, with above mentioned snack supplies, and a good first aid kit with a few extra items, bike tools and tire repair kit, 20 bucks cash and medical information card. http://www.medids.com/free-id.php
 

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Finally a diabetic forum.


I've been type one for 16 years now (i'm 30 now). Been mountain biking since I was about 12/13. My HbA1c is currently 6.7. I use Novorapid and Lantus as well as an Accu-Check meter. I've had my highs an lows (too many lows actually).



How do those of you find riding with pumps? My doctor has mentioned them in the past, but I think things could get a bit messy (not to mention broken) when you fall off and land on the pump.
 

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kiwi_matt said:
Finally a diabetic forum.

I've been type one for 16 years now (i'm 30 now). Been mountain biking since I was about 12/13. My HbA1c is currently 6.7. I use Novorapid and Lantus as well as an Accu-Check meter. I've had my highs an lows (too many lows actually).

How do those of you find riding with pumps? My doctor has mentioned them in the past, but I think things could get a bit messy (not to mention broken) when you fall off and land on the pump.
Quote from my son:

"My Medtronic pump is invincible. It comes with an armored case. You can fall off your bike and land on a curb pump first and it won't break. If it breaks, it has a lifetime guarantee. A diabetic can go about 9 hours without insulin with no ill effects so you can ride out of anywhere with a broken pump."

Ask anyone using the pump what the lifestyle benefits are. I'm sure your doctor has explained the medical benefits.

From a parenting perspective, the pump turned my boy from a "diabetic teenager" to a "teenager".
 

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Pegasusphm1 said:
Type II diabetic myself, 6'3 and dropped weight from 312 lbs on Dec 4th to 244lbs as of last week. Worked myself off all Insulin and pills since Feb 8th. Big issue was the initial rapid weight loss requiring medication dosage adjustment about every 72 hours during the first couple of months. about every 5-7 pounds a needed to reduce. A1C is between 5.3 - 5-5 over the last six months since coming off medications.

Using livestrong.com to record my meter, food, and exercises. Great site they started MyPlate-D for diabetics.

Picked up a vintage MTB abotu two weeks ago using it as a commuter and overall round town ride, plan on dropping another 20 pounds and then get a nice bike for tours and such, but keep this as my daily ride.

I find I need to check my glucose levels about every 20 minutes and I may need a snack, I pack.

Gu Gel
Glucose Tablets
Trail Mix bars
Gummie bears

Along with a good first aid pouch in my Camelbak HAWG.

I work out up to 3 hours a day at times with swimming, cycling, running, weights I end up with a 1500-2500 calories burn. A word of caution about whey protein, I stay away from it, it increases acidic levels and is hard on the kidneys.

Going to do the Tour De Cure next year, I just missed this years run. Training to get my Red Rider jersey next spring. Hoooah!!!

I use O'Neils law, which is 'Murphy was an Optimist", so I usually wear cargo paints / shorts. meter in the left pocket, cell phone in the right, Medical ID and heart rate monitor left wrist, 550 para-cord bracelet on the right wrist. Camelbak 100 oz, with above mentioned snack supplies, and a good first aid kit with a few extra items, bike tools and tire repair kit, 20 bucks cash and medical information card. http://www.medids.com/free-id.php
First of all, congratulations on taking control of your Diabetes. I'm curious though, your
A1C of 5.3 - 5.5 sounds more like type 1 than 2. I'm type 2 as well, but hover around 6.0 - 6.2 off medication. Sounds more like most of the type 1's I know. How do you do that?
 

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My Medtronic pump has stood up well. I use a chest strap to hold it while riding, to keep it out of harms way under my jersey. Took a dip in the lake couple weeks ago (forgetting the pump was on) but it kept on ticking.
I need good food on rides like raisins. If you mix Heed with your water you will keep the blood glucose level fairly stable. Heed has stevia which means less up spikes than some other power drinks. I always carry more food than I think I might need in case the trip turns out longer.
 

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alexrex20 said:
tell that to a DKA patient.
What's DKA?

Never mind. I figured it out. A DKA patient shouldn't be riding around on a mountain bike. They should be taking an ambulance ride to the hospital.

I'm sure my son meant a diabetic who had at least some control over their disease could go for 9 hours without insulin.
 
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