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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got done building a 06 rfx, i am looking for a starting point for setting up my rear shock. I am 195lbs with gear.
What size spring??? 600???
how much boost???
clicks of propedal???

I am mostly riding pretty tame singletrack for the time being, a few 3ft drops but nothing to big. I am just looking for a starting point, i will fine tune on the trail later
 

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In my experience, changes in the boost pressure do not make a lot of difference. The minimum is 75psi, but due to the problems that low air could cause and to insure agaiinst variation in guages and possible leaking, I do not go below 100psi.
I think that both of you guys are on the right track with the spring rates. Check TFTuned for a calcualtor, but riding style and shock/spring variations can make a difference. There is no 'one' answer.
The RFX is fairly progressive, so you will not need much boost. I would start @ about 1/3 in. A sorter spring with more sag might need more boost (smaller volume) and vice versa. Keep in mind that if you change the boost volume, your psi will change and should be adjusted accordingly.
The pro pedal can be turned quite easily by hand even while riding. I turn mine up and down depending on the individual ride.
 

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If you want to collect some suggestins, there's a ton of threads on this in this forum. Try two or three searches and you'll find a few.

In general, if the Boost and PP are working properly, the settings are still heavily dependant on personal preference weight, riding style and terrain. Even the biggest clydes don't like going ove 150psi boost.... most people in general find running 120-135 a good starting point. (135 for heavier riders or ppl who want more platform control)

The Boost, when working as designed (some folks have complained their PP is not effective) will simply shift the minimum setting on the PP. If you add more boost it will be like having more + turns on the PP. So basically if you are starting out with 8-10 or more clicks on your PP, you can probably increase your boost and remove most of the pp clicks for additional max adjustment range.

A person around 200# could start with 130 PSI and fiddle to taste from there.

If you do a lot of rock crawling or other very techy riding less PP and a lower boost will help with keeping it supple and keeping the tire glued at lower speeds. If you do a lot of out of the saddle mashing and other rapid cyclical power stroking you'll probably prefer more PP, again if the clicks on the PP get high, you can raise the boost and start from fewer clicks.

The Bottom out is for end stroke. 1/3 is a good starting point depending on your weight, if you have the correct spring and how hard you're hitting it. More if you bottom harshly or frequently. Boost should not affect it to any noticable degree. Bottom out also has some secondary effects on the midstroke by starting the ramp-up resistance sooner. I find when the mid stroke is too mushy, a little more BO helps keep me from blowing throug it.

one other thing: Fox has a spring tolerance of +- 15% from what's marked so even if someone tells you they are happy with a particular spring weight and settings and they do the same kind of riding you do, you may find your experience quite different.

Here are some other threads thatmay be useful:
Here
Here
Here
Here

G'luck!
 

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jmtbkr said:
So why have PP if you have the ability to adjust the boost valve pressure, or vice versa(why the boost valve)?
BV really changes the range of the PP adjustments. If you start running high PP and are not getting the stiffining results you want, then you can up the BV and run less PP. If it is too stiff and you have backed down PP all the way, you can drop BV and up PP a touch.
 

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Thanks.
I've been figuring that out for myself in the past few weeks. But there seems to be too many adjustments for my tastes. I like a set-it-and-forget-it shock, like a RP3 would be. I understand why Fox made this shock, but also wondering why Turner only spec'd it on the 2006 Spots. The new ones are going to a RP23, no?
I may go for a Vanilla coil or a Pushed RP3. I'm not entirely sold on this shock
 

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Should have opted for the DHX coil. It's an amazing shock.

You could try the RP3 air sleeve, if you know someone willing to let you try theirs, or a new one is inexpensive in comparison to a whole new shock.

The point of the DHX and all these adjustments is that previously every adjustment was coupled to the preload in some way. Bottoming out? Turn up the preload, while losing full travel and small bump sensitivity. Bobbing? Turn up the preload. What these adjustments allow for is decoupling of the dynamics of the shock from the spring preload. The spring is basically there just to simply hold you up throughout the stroke of the shock. You should not have to compromise the ride and sag to dial out other bad features, which the Boost, BO, and PP do for you. You can now run your preload soft for a nice ride on the trails, while the PP and Boost dials out the bob and the BO adjuster uses the air in the Boost chamber to increase resistance to bottoming out. Once I saw the diagrams and figured it out, it was pretty easy to figure out what I needed.

The DXH coil is a great shock.
 
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