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Do you have a mechanic stand at home?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I've found a ton of pretty good vids on how to adjust rear derailleurs but I'm wondering if the same methods still apply when the bike is upside down ...

I'm assuming the tension of everything is screwed when the bike is upside down and that the normal adjustments wouldn't work?

Asking as I don't have a bike stand and don't want to get one if I'm not going to use it much ...

Cheers
 

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It makes no difference. The tension is maintained by the derailleur, and in any case you are adjusting where the derailleur sits relative to the cassette or rings. A stand just makes it easier to move around the bike.

You can often use things that are already available instead of stand. l use to use a S-hook slung from the rafters and old tube slipped under the seat.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It makes no difference. The tension is maintained by the derailleur, and in any case you are adjusting where the derailleur sits relative to the cassette or rings. A stand just makes it easier to move around the bike.

You can often use things that are already available instead of stand. l use to use a S-hook slung from the rafters and old tube slipped under the seat.

Tim
Sweet, thanks for clearing that up, Tim - appreciate the helpful answer. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have often thought that I should practice adjusting with the bike upside down against the day that I am caught out on the trail needing to use, for example, my emergency derailleur hanger. I guess if that happens, I will just need to stand on my head in order to maintain the necessary perspective. :D
Haha yeah, although you've got a good point - kinda hard to fit a workstand in Camelbak. ;-)
 

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I have often thought that I should practice adjusting with the bike upside down against the day that I am caught out on the trail needing to use, for example, my emergency derailleur hanger. I guess if that happens, I will just need to stand on my head in order to maintain the necessary perspective. :D
 

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Hi all,

I've found a ton of pretty good vids on how to adjust rear derailleurs but I'm wondering if the same methods still apply when the bike is upside down ...

I'm assuming the tension of everything is screwed when the bike is upside down and that the normal adjustments wouldn't work?

Asking as I don't have a bike stand and don't want to get one if I'm not going to use it much ...

Cheers
As Wombat noted, it makes no difference in the adjustments. They all work the same whether the bike is upright or upside down. But gravity does have an effect. You can get a good basic adjustment with the bike upside down with practice. It takes a little tweaking and getting used to. But to get a really good accurate tune the bike should be in the position that the deraillures were designed to operate in, right side up. The problem being is that gravity does have an effect on chain position and the rear derailleur cage position when the bike is upside down. It makes fine adjustment difficult. But it can be done. It's just much easier in a stand.

And as for a work stand and it's uses. Keep in mind that drive train adjustment isn't the only thing you'll use it for. A work stand makes most repairs and maintenance MUCH easier. Fork maintenance (ever try to change the oils in a fork with it upside down!), derailleur adjustment, cable maintenance, wheel removal and maintenance, brake adjustment and maintenance, general cleaning, chain lubrication, just about anything that you can think of, is easier with the bike mounted in a work stand. And it's not just making it easier to move around the bike. A good stand will have a height adjustment that will allow you to raise the bike so that you aren't bending over all the time to work on it.

You may think that you won't use a stand much. But get one and you'll find that every time you go to work on the bike you'll use it. A good stand just makes it that much easier.

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
And as for a work stand and it's uses. Keep in mind that drive train adjustment isn't the only thing you'll use it for. A work stand makes most repairs and maintenance MUCH easier. Fork maintenance (ever try to change the oils in a fork with it upside down!), derailleur adjustment, cable maintenance, wheel removal and maintenance, brake adjustment and maintenance, general cleaning, chain lubrication, just about anything that you can think of, is easier with the bike mounted in a work stand. And it's not just making it easier to move around the bike. A good stand will have a height adjustment that will allow you to raise the bike so that you aren't bending over all the time to work on it.

You may think that you won't use a stand much. But get one and you'll find that every time you go to work on the bike you'll use it. A good stand just makes it that much easier.

Good Dirt
That's a pretty compelling argument for getting a work stand right there. I'll probably have another look around and see what I can find.

My thoughts on not using it much is that I only had road bikes until a few weeks ago and never worked on them much (SRAM RED didn't need any adjustment on my bike) but since switching back to MTB very recently I know I'll be adjusting stuff more ... the bikes take more of a hammering, after all. :)
 
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