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What should I do?

  • Trade bicycle in for new bike.

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I've got a 2005 Specialized Stumpjumper that I bought new some 15 years ago. Spent most of the last 15 years as a cruise-around-the-neighborhood bike and never really used the way it was intended. Every few years I'd bring it in for a tune up and just keep riding it. It's essentially an old bike in pristine condition. I've recently begun trail riding with my young children who are just getting into riding. They have brand new Marin Bayview Trail bikes which are quite nice. Lately, I've noticed the shocks on my Stumpjumper are in poor shape and the lockouts aren't even working. I'm reluctant to bring it in knowing that it's going to cost me at least a few hundred bucks just to get them fully functional again. My dilemma is whether or not to dump another few hundred bucks into this aging bike to keep it going or just sell it for a couple hundred bucks and get a new one knowing full well that I won't be able to get into a modern-day equivalent without spending at least $1500. Or am I just better off replacing my shocks with new ones and ride it out as I really don't have any issues with the bike otherwise.

This is the exact bike I currently have with corresponding components listed.
2005 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR 100 - Bicycle Details - BicycleBlueBook.com
 

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I would find a local shop and see if they can do a fork service on the suspension. Otherwise you are selling a bike with suspension that needs service.....

If no one is local there are a few that will do mail order work like PUSH and here Locally Fluid Focus is a great shop that will work on just about anything.
 

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Ian Limburg
*Custom* 2016 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 770 MSL
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I've got a 2005 Specialized Stumpjumper that I bought new some 15 years ago. Spent most of the last 15 years as a cruise-around-the-neighborhood bike and never really used the way it was intended. Every few years I'd bring it in for a tune up and just keep riding it. It's essentially an old bike in pristine condition. I've recently begun trail riding with my young children who are just getting into riding. They have brand new Marin Bayview Trail bikes which are quite nice. Lately, I've noticed the shocks on my Stumpjumper are in poor shape and the lockouts aren't even working. I'm reluctant to bring it in knowing that it's going to cost me at least a few hundred bucks just to get them fully functional again. My dilemma is whether or not to dump another few hundred bucks into this aging bike to keep it going or just sell it for a couple hundred bucks and get a new one knowing full well that I won't be able to get into a modern-day equivalent without spending at least $1500. Or am I just better off replacing my shocks with new ones and ride it out as I really don't have any issues with the bike otherwise.

This is the exact bike I currently have with corresponding components listed.
2005 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR 100 - Bicycle Details - BicycleBlueBook.com
I'd say use Pinkbike to sell your current bike and then shop for a slightly newer used bike on there. That's what I usually do. What were you hoping to spend?
 

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I think you would be best trying to repair first then if not just buy new shocks. If the rest of the bike is in good working order it would cost a lot less to fix it then buy a whole new bike. Depending on how much the repair would cost it might be better just to buy new ones. Might be difficult to sell for a decent price if everything isn't working as well.
 

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I think you would be best trying to repair first then if not just buy new shocks. If the rest of the bike is in good working order it would cost a lot less to fix it then buy a whole new bike. Depending on how much the repair would cost it might be better just to buy new ones. Might be difficult to sell for a decent price if everything isn't working as well.
The biggest difficulty with buying "new" forks is it is harder to find straight steer tube forks designed for the old style headsets brand new.
 

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I think a couple demo rides from an LBS on some new bikes in your price range will help you come up with a decision.
 

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Do some research on forks and compatibility with your frame . The cheapest replacement would be a rigid fork and the easiest to find. Also ,if you can ride some newer bikes ,you might decide that a new bike is the way to go.
 

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Keep in mind that if you buy anything with suspension, that suspension needs serviced or the same thing is going to happen to it - it will degrade until it's effectively broken.
 

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The biggest difficulty with buying "new" forks is it is harder to find straight steer tube forks designed for the old style headsets brand new.
I should have specified either 'new' second hand forks or brand new as in unused. There's still plenty of 100mm 26 inch straight steerer forks around for a good price on ebay and pinkbike but might have to inquire about the condition further. Also can always use 27.5 forks with a straight steerer on 26 inch wheels. Finding brand new ones for a decent price will be more difficult but still a lot cheaper than a new bike! No idea about shock compatibility though. I agree with the last post would be worth going to a local bike shop to see if the old fork and shock are repairable.
 

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Have you seen new bike prices? You’d have to spend 3x as much to get the new version of that bike. I’d service the suspension and keep riding it if it still fits you well and it’s still in pristine condition. You can’t get away from suspension service anyway - eventually you’ll have to do the new bike.
If the bike doesn’t fit you well, it’s best to sell it and invest in a new bike. Maybe you’ll ride more then.
 

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fix it. replacing the fork and shock shouldn't cost too much since you're looking at "old tech" and you should be able to find plenty of new take offs...
 

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I vote used bike. You can get a lot of bike for not much money if you are patient and only go after bikes that are priced using common sense. It might not be the same concern for you that it is for me, but I see the straight steerer fork as the big issue. I have a 2009 29er bike that can only run a straight steer fork, and it's very difficult to find anything that will work if it ever needs replacing; at least anything of quality. New purchases to me need the ability to run a tapered fork or I'm just inviting the same problems I worry about with the old bike.

Might as well spend a bit more and join the modern age and get longer serviceability out of it. Plus, getting a new bike is awesome.
 

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Rear shock will be harder to replace, I’d service if possible. For a fork, I would absolutely go with rockshox recon. Amazingly, Amazon seems to have it in stock and at a great price. I’m normally not a Fan of buying bike parts through Amazon, but if it’s the only option, and a good deal why not. (Listed price isn’t that much more than servicing an old fork) This fork is probably longer travel than oem and will change your bikes geo a bit but I also think I remember researching and finding travel/ ATC can be lowered. I just put one of these on an old 26er hardtail and it’s awesome for moderate off-roading, definitely up to anything your 2005 bike is cut out for. Plus it has rim brake posts and disc mount, very hard to find rim brake suspension forks these days. Good luck!

RockShox 30 Silver TK Fork: 26", 100mm, Coil, 9mm QR, Crown Adjustment, 1-1/8" Alum Steerer, Disc Brake and Rim Brake, Amazon.com : RockShox 30 Silver TK Fork: 26", 100mm, Coil, 9mm QR, Crown Adjustment, 1-1/8" Alum Steerer, Disc Brake and Rim Brake, : Clothing
 

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I should have specified either 'new' second hand forks or brand new as in unused. There's still plenty of 100mm 26 inch straight steerer forks around for a good price on ebay and pinkbike but might have to inquire about the condition further. Also can always use 27.5 forks with a straight steerer on 26 inch wheels. Finding brand new ones for a decent price will be more difficult but still a lot cheaper than a new bike! No idea about shock compatibility though. I agree with the last post would be worth going to a local bike shop to see if the old fork and shock are repairable.
And there is no guarantee the used fork wont need a service soon.
 

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And there is no guarantee the used fork wont need a service soon.
Agreed. All the more reason to buy a new “budget” fork. Also I should add I noticed that I posted a link to the coil version of the recon. There is also an air version available for about $80 more. Air will be a bit lighter (maybe a pound?) and more adjustable with air pressure instead of having to swap coil springs although coil usually has the benefit of longer service intervals. I have the air version and it’s working great so far. I run extra sag with less air pressure to somewhat offset the higher ATC. that is definitely not ideal for performance but it’s comfy and this is not a bike for charging hard anyway.
 

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New bike will be best choice, you can find within 2k decent f/s

upgrading old will not be thebest option, however you can use tapered fork with external bottom cup spacer, therea are plenty of shok’s also available;

however you are missing in general:
Dropper post
1x wide range drivertrain
Geometry
Short stem/ wide bar
Decent brakes
Etc
All of those upgrades will be in 1to 2 k range anyway.

so I would recommend budget next best bike in your life, while riding **** out of existing!

then donate existing to some kids in need, or sell for 200$
You can always keep it in garage for good memory and beer ride or so
 

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you can use tapered fork with external bottom cup spacer
You make some great points. I have never heard of this option though. I thought the tapered section of the steerer tube would be too long to work with a reducer cup, or if a reducer cup was made stack height would go through the roof. Do you have a link for such a headset/adapter to make a tapered steerer work on a 1 1/8 straight head tube? Or did I misinterpret that?
 
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