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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to get a new frame/bike for my wife. Her medium Salsa, while she likes it, is indeed too big for her and it limits her riding because she worries (rightly so) about being able to dismount/remount in some situations. It is problematic and I want to remedy it.

I am aware, and still strongly considering some of the open mold Chiner frames; she would appreciate the reduction in weight too. But I wanted some input on nice aluminum frames as well as there are some occasional tip overs. Nothing that I honestly think would damage a decent carbon frame, but it is a concern. Also, the bike tends to be handled less skillfully when I'm not the one moving around, so superficial scratches are common too.

Suggestions? I'd put her on a small in most manufacturers; but want to maximize standover as much as possible.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Giant Liv, really, most modern aluminum frames from the big manufacturers have generous stand-over these days. There's only so much you can do though when you keep increasing the travel, so more travel still lifts the bike up some. If the bike is too big, that compounds the issue though. I take it you are referring to "Chinese" frames with that term "chiner"? Beware, these generally do not have the considering for bearings and product support that some of the mainstream bikes do. While I'd trust them for a hardtail, like one of my fatbikes, I wouldn't with suspension, there's too much to screw up with leverage rate and curve, damping tune, lateral flex, bearing designs, and so on.

This is also likely a skill/practice issue. Really, around a certain range, the issue is more about how you step to the side. Going back to the above, in some conditions, you simply won't have much stand-over, like uphill in rough terrain when the bike is on a crowned or rocky portion and your feet happen to be lower. It's unavoidable, it will happen. You must learn to step to the side. Another thing that can help is a dropper post, to push it down before swinging your leg back on the bike, especially in these situations. When you are tired, swinging your leg over a bike in rough terrain can be a lot harder than it sounds and become quite the balancing act in rough terrain. You can also lower it before getting off, making that function much easier too. I like the bikeyoke revive for it's ultra-smooth action and ease of being able to push it down with my hand.

Guerrilla Gravity makes some nice frames, they recently switched the front triangle to carbon, but they have a reputation for durability, so that might be worth checking out, more on the trail/abuse side of things, which seems where you are going.

Pay no attention to my signature, that's just one of the many crazy things that TE has said over the years that make no sense.
 
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