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Not a role model
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Competing designs:

Motion France

Bicycle tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Tire Bicycle wheel rim


Structure SCW1

Bicycle tire Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel Bicycle fork


Wheel Bicycle tire Tire Bicycle wheel rim Mode of transport


I personally am looking forward to when linkage forks take over. I like Structure's design philosophy and holistic take on it, balancing out the suspension feel and preserving geometry.
 

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As someone who's quietly been hoping for linkage forks to make a realistic return to MTB, this is a real disappointment.
I knew it was coming, but nothing about it and my distain has led me to post on here in probably the first time in 15 years!

To me, this is an Apple iPhone X of a product - huge, largely unwarranted talk of revolutionary technology and redefining performance at a price tag that ensures most actual customers will be some of the most clueless types ever to throw a leg over an MTB.

Perhaps that's why the team felt justified in constructing this otherwise promising fork out of a fashionable material, rather than one which suits the environment the fork should be used in, safe in the knowledge that it's unlikely to see any hard use.

The proliferation of Carbon Fibre in cycling is alarming to anyone with even a cursory understanding of how it's made and the realities of dealing with it at end of life, but for such a decorated engineer to use it so liberally in an area of the bike that is exposed to heavy impact is inexcusable & demonstrates a lack of leadership (even if one of the team founded ENVE).
 

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Maybe I'm missing something, but doesn't preservation of trail (and preservation of head angle under compression) via the fork mean that a dual suspension bike will effectively slacken quite significantly under compression affecting both the front and rear suspension? I'm sure some people will say otherwise, but that sounds terrible to me...I don't want my front wheel effectively moving away from me as I load up front and rear suspension in a corner.
 

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I have less than zero interest in a linkage fork. IMO the best thing about a telescopic fork is the amount of stoke you have to work with when getting them tuned in. A 120mm travel fork has 120mm of stroke to play around with. When you start using linkages your 120mm of travel now may only have 1.75" or 2" of stroke at the shock.

So when you start playing around with settings to try and get a certain feel early in the stroke or in the mid-stroke instead of having, say 30mm early and 60mm mid-stroke you now have like 10mm and 25mm. Everything has to happen on a tighter scale.
 

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At that price, they should have painted it yellow...

Honestly, although it might offer a slightly different and maybe even improved ride, it will be a very hard sell. I mean, the current crop of telescoping forks are very good and I don't see people rushing to try something new.
 

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I've ridden some linkage forks (Amp, Girvin, 20 years ago) but don't remember what I thought of them all that well at this point. All suspension basically sucked then, really. I've ridden a couple of BMWs with telelever or whatever they call it and disliked them but I am too incompetent of a moto person on pavement for that to mean anything.

I was thinking about this yesterday during my ride, though, and I sort of question whether anti-dive and constant trail are even desirable on a mountain bike.

If I'm braking hard into a corner, I actually *want* a lower trail number and more weight on the front wheel (since I'm going to be going slower and turning), so the front end dive is, within reason, a positive feature. And if I'm riding on more open terrain where I'm not braking much/experiencing dive, the more open turns will work well with the higher trail number.

If I was building a bike for a trail with nothing but tight turns, I'd want lower steering trail, after all. So in a way the brake dive is giving me that bike - but only when I need it. On the faster/straighter stuff where I'm not on the brakes, I can enjoy higher trail and more stability.

Don't get me wrong, I'd love to try this and I'm sure the team they put together didn't make something that sucks - but I'm also not sure what they're touting as the main benefit is actually something I want.

I'd never buy a $2700 fork even if it was noticeably better than my Fox 34, but I'd love to try one and see what it's actually like.

-Walt
 

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As someone who's quietly been hoping for linkage forks to make a realistic return to MTB, this is a real disappointment.
I knew it was coming, but nothing about it and my distain has led me to post on here in probably the first time in 15 years!

To me, this is an Apple iPhone X of a product - huge, largely unwarranted talk of revolutionary technology and redefining performance at a price tag that ensures most actual customers will be some of the most clueless types ever to throw a leg over an MTB.

Perhaps that's why the team felt justified in constructing this otherwise promising fork out of a fashionable material, rather than one which suits the environment the fork should be used in, safe in the knowledge that it's unlikely to see any hard use.

The proliferation of Carbon Fibre in cycling is alarming to anyone with even a cursory understanding of how it's made and the realities of dealing with it at end of life, but for such a decorated engineer to use it so liberally in an area of the bike that is exposed to heavy impact is inexcusable & demonstrates a lack of leadership (even if one of the team founded ENVE).
Are we still talking about carbon fiber components being weak? You can take whatever dig you'd like at the fork, but the one that will hold the least amount of water is saying carbon isn't strong enough for a fork. I've been hammering a rigid carbon for for years no issues.

$2700 for a fork, that's crazy. A fork made of carbon fiber, very sane.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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I have less than zero interest in a linkage fork. IMO the best thing about a telescopic fork is the amount of stoke you have to work with when getting them tuned in. A 120mm travel fork has 120mm of stroke to play around with. When you start using linkages your 120mm of travel now may only have 1.75" or 2" of stroke at the shock.

So when you start playing around with settings to try and get a certain feel early in the stroke or in the mid-stroke instead of having, say 30mm early and 60mm mid-stroke you now have like 10mm and 25mm. Everything has to happen on a tighter scale.
Like rear suspension? Seems to work ok....
 

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I rode the Lawill Leader back in 1996, was by far the best performing fork at the time. Even better than the Z1. It was the same idea as this one. But it never took off due to lack of funding, and industry support.

This go around is not going to be the same. The Trust team is genius.

--Make 2500 of them before announcing. Means they have financial backing
--Make it at the very very high end of the market. Means that most will covet it, particularly after some glowing reviews.
--Spend 2 years or so at this price point to work out any kinks. Then come out with a $1200 version that everyone will buy like crazy
--Assemble a team of industry veterans that people trust. Mert Lawill was a motocross guy, not a bike guy with huge wins already.

I'd bet on it, this is the real deal. 5 years from now, if you are buying a $6k bike it will have something like this. This is one of the last areas of high end MTB's that is ready for a revolution.
 

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1,155 Posts
As someone who's quietly been hoping for linkage forks to make a realistic return to MTB, this is a real disappointment.
I knew it was coming, but nothing about it and my distain has led me to post on here in probably the first time in 15 years!

To me, this is an Apple iPhone X of a product - huge, largely unwarranted talk of revolutionary technology and redefining performance at a price tag that ensures most actual customers will be some of the most clueless types ever to throw a leg over an MTB.

Perhaps that's why the team felt justified in constructing this otherwise promising fork out of a fashionable material, rather than one which suits the environment the fork should be used in, safe in the knowledge that it's unlikely to see any hard use.

The proliferation of Carbon Fibre in cycling is alarming to anyone with even a cursory understanding of how it's made and the realities of dealing with it at end of life, but for such a decorated engineer to use it so liberally in an area of the bike that is exposed to heavy impact is inexcusable & demonstrates a lack of leadership (even if one of the team founded ENVE).
Jiminy Xmas - you got to be kidding?
 

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397 Posts
I rode the Lawill Leader back in 1996, was by far the best performing fork at the time. Even better than the Z1. It was the same idea as this one. But it never took off due to lack of funding, and industry support.

This go around is not going to be the same. The Trust team is genius.

--Make 2500 of them before announcing. Means they have financial backing
--Make it at the very very high end of the market. Means that most will covet it, particularly after some glowing reviews.
--Spend 2 years or so at this price point to work out any kinks. Then come out with a $1200 version that everyone will buy like crazy
--Assemble a team of industry veterans that people trust. Mert Lawill was a motocross guy, not a bike guy with huge wins already.

I'd bet on it, this is the real deal. 5 years from now, if you are buying a $6k bike it will have something like this. This is one of the last areas of high end MTB's that is ready for a revolution.
yes, yes, yes, you have seen the future !
 

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Not a role model
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1,312 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If I'm braking hard into a corner, I actually *want* a lower trail number and more weight on the front wheel (since I'm going to be going slower and turning), so the front end dive is, within reason, a positive feature. And if I'm riding on more open terrain where I'm not braking much/experiencing dive, the more open turns will work well with the higher trail number.

If I was building a bike for a trail with nothing but tight turns, I'd want lower steering trail, after all. So in a way the brake dive is giving me that bike - but only when I need it. On the faster/straighter stuff where I'm not on the brakes, I can enjoy higher trail and more stability.
Fork compression shortening the front end and steepening the HTA sure does load the front with more weight, but I see that as a bad thing as a short rider on a bike that's already nose-heavy. Too much weight on the front pushes the front tire out, especially at the apex when/where the front is loaded most, forcing me to compensate by actually shifting weight back. If a linkage fork keeps things so consistent that I don't have to do that weight shift, it'd make cornering a helluva lot simpler.

Lower trail means that steering's much more sensitive. If you get that through offset, then the front wheel is more inboard too when turned. I tried both, and I like needing to recruit more of my body to turn. It jives with my style of controlling the bike from my core.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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40,403 Posts
It better have some absolutely out-of-this-world fantastic damping at that price, given it's not lighter than a Pike, let alone it's about a pound heavier than 34SC. In fact, I'd rather have fantastic damping in a telescopic fork first, even if this does work well. Crappy factory tunes are all over the place these days. Fox's Grip2 is a good step in the right direction. Adjustable high/low rebound and compression that truly works and doesn't just make it harsh. That's where you start, then worry about chassis, etc. Supposedly they have some "good stuff", but I haven't seen any real info on it yet...
 
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