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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm researching an article I'm writing on Bicyclists with One Good Eye

My general interests are in accessablity. I became interested in "One Eyed Cyclist" topic after a conversation with an adult who said that he could not ride a bike because he only has vision in one eye. The individual also drove me in his car - one of the safer drivers I have riden with. He has no observable balance problem when walking.

I prefer to hear from cyclists who have good vision in only one eye or persons who are knowlegable on the topic. In avionics technology there is Distance Measuring Equipment to help determine distance from objects. My thought is there may be someone using technology or adaptive skills to compensate for the lack of biocular vision and judging depth of field.

Please, respond before the end of August 2005.
 

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I realize I am not your target, but I wear contacts and on more than one occasion have lost one on a trail. I have a very hard time riding with both eyes open and wildly different visions, but have very few problems riding with the "bad" eye shut. for me it's not the loss of the second eye, it's the disorientation when I try to use them both and they have different focal points.
 

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Sheepherder/Cat Herder
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Two Good Eyes Are Over-rated

Swain -

Someone referred me to this thread. Seems you wanna know how it can be done. Well, speaking for myself, I am just plain stubborn.

Background: I lost my biocular vision about 3+ years ago. I suffer from thyroid related orbit disease which has left me with diplopia, aka double vision, and some eye protrusion. It was, and sometimes still is, a hellavu time....seeing two of everything. I solved the problem by patching on eye. I bought a pair of Oakley Eye Jacket 2.0 sunglasses because they fit on the outside of my orbit, and I fitted them with mirrored lenses. The mirrored lenses hide the patch in the left lens.

In doing all this, I lost all depth perception, not that I had any with diplopia. I rode though. I went slow at first as a learned how to ride without depth perception. I bought a Santa Cruz Blur (4 some inches of travel). Full suspension allowed a certain amount of forgiveness, and allowed for a higher factor of safety. It was also a reward for not going completely nuts

As far as using the excuse, and I do mean excuse, of not being able to ride a bike because you only have one eye...that is BS. Total BS. Length of shadows provide clues on depth. Proper position on your bike allows a rider to absorb trail features, as anyone who rails rock gardens knows how important positioning is. Proper center of gravity and good balance will allow anyone, biocular vision or not, to ride over nearly anything. There are so many ways to see......And most of all....you gotta have the nerve/bravado to ride. Ya gotta want it.

I've ridden some technical trails...The Portal and Amasa Back in Moab....all with one eye open. I even have a DH bike.....and love to practice riding whoops and wheelie drops....

Oh yeah, talk to they guys at Santa Cruz bikes. They sponsor a guy who is legally blind!!! They also ride with a guy who lost an eye. I hear he rails.

Swainwashdc said:
I'm researching an artical I'm writing on Bicyclists with One Good Eye

My general interests are in accessablity. I became interested in "One Eyed Cyclist" topic after a conversation with an adult who said that he could not ride a bike because he only has vision in one eye. The individual also drove me in his car - one of the safer drivers I have riden with. He has no observable balance problem when walking.

I prefer to hear from cyclists who have good vision in only one eye or persons who are knowlegable on the topic. In avionics technology there is Distance Measuring Equipment to help determine distance from objects. My thought is there may be someone using technology or adaptive skills to compensate for the lack of biocular vision and judging depth of field.

Please, respond before the end of August 2005.
 

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My father has had vision in only one eye since birth, and has ridden and raced motorcycles since he was four. You adapt.
 

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Yummy
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Search for all posts by Leel on this board and you'll see the kind of riding he's capable of.

One friendly note ... since you're trying to be a writer, the correct spelling of what you're trying to write is an "article". It'll really help your credibility in the editor's eyes ...

Kn.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for first hand information :) Justin

Visicypher said:
Swain -

Someone referred me to this thread. Seems you wanna know how it can be done. Well, speaking for myself, I am just plain stubborn.

Background: I lost my biocular vision about 3+ years ago. I suffer from thyroid related orbit disease which has left me with diplopia, aka double vision, and some eye protrusion. It was, and sometimes still is, a hellavu time....seeing two of everything. I solved the problem by patching on eye. I bought a pair of Oakley Eye Jacket 2.0 sunglasses because they fit on the outside of my orbit, and I fitted them with mirrored lenses. The mirrored lenses hide the patch in the left lens.

In doing all this, I lost all depth perception, not that I had any with diplopia. I rode though. I went slow at first as a learned how to ride without depth perception. I bought a Santa Cruz Blur (4 some inches of travel). Full suspension allowed a certain amount of forgiveness, and allowed for a higher factor of safety. It was also a reward for not going completely nuts

As far as using the excuse, and I do mean excuse, of not being able to ride a bike because you only have one eye...that is BS. Total BS. Length of shadows provide clues on depth. Proper position on your bike allows a rider to absorb trail features, as anyone who rails rock gardens knows how important positioning is. Proper center of gravity and good balance will allow anyone, biocular vision or not, to ride over nearly anything. There are so many ways to see......And most of all....you gotta have the nerve/bravado to ride. Ya gotta want it.

I've ridden some technical trails...The Portal and Amasa Back in Moab....all with one eye open. I even have a DH bike.....and love to practice riding whoops and wheelie drops....

Oh yeah, talk to they guys at Santa Cruz bikes. They sponsor a guy who is legally blind!!! They also ride with a guy who lost an eye. I hear he rails.
:) Great detail. I agree vision in only one eye doesn't mean one can not operate a vehicle. Thanks for the first person information. - Swain
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for spelling assist - well taken

K'Endo said:
Search for all posts by Leel on this board and you'll see the kind of riding he's capable of.

One friendly note ... since you're trying to be a writer, the correct spelling of what you're trying to write is an "article". It'll really help your credibility in the editor's eyes ...

Kn.
:) Point well made. I like that this site allows editing of work posted by its originator. I need to run all my work through spelling checker before posting or distributing work. Swain
 

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curds and gravy fool
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A Bicyclopscyclist?

sorry, I have nothing useful to add, just some cheap wordplay.
 

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Limits?

Can't remember where I read this, but binocular vision only provides depth perception for a limited distance. Off the top of my head, it's something like 10 ft or so.

The reason is that the amount of difference between the images provided by eyes separated by 3-4" drops to nothing over distances much greater than that separation. Sorry I can't provide a link.

Walt
 

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Swainwashdc said:
I'm researching an article I'm writing on Bicyclists with One Good Eye

My general interests are in accessablity. I became interested in "One Eyed Cyclist" topic after a conversation with an adult who said that he could not ride a bike because he only has vision in one eye. The individual also drove me in his car - one of the safer drivers I have riden with. He has no observable balance problem when walking.

I prefer to hear from cyclists who have good vision in only one eye or persons who are knowlegable on the topic. In avionics technology there is Distance Measuring Equipment to help determine distance from objects. My thought is there may be someone using technology or adaptive skills to compensate for the lack of biocular vision and judging depth of field.

Please, respond before the end of August 2005.

Get yourself an eye patch. Put it on and go ride your bike. Then write your article after you have first hand experience.



Zen

:)
 

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It's about showing up.
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An "older" rider,

a parent of one of our High School Racers started riding with us. He is blind in one eye. He was great to have along. In the spirit of our racing he put his tire on the starting line a couple of times the first year. In the second year he found himself challenged by an abrupt transition from shadow to bright sun and into washboard, went down, and took a bar end in the blind eye.
What we had here was a 57 year old man with limited racing experience working at his limits confronting a challenging light situation and the bizarre cadence induced by washboard. He doesn't race anymore. He has chosen to lead a group of older riders on the pavement.
 

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Depth Perception is Overrated

I will give you my experience. I am legally blind in my left eye, been this way since birth due to something called Peter's Anamoly (essentially scar tissue on the retina). According to eye doctors I have no depth perception, yet I don't struggle riding or racing.


I am a sport class racer, with higher aspirations of course, and rarely have a problem because of obstacles, terrain reading etc Maybe it helps that I have never been able to see out of both eyes properly and I have adapted I don't know. It is not my eyesight that causes me to not win races, that's for sure.

The only time that I ever experience any problems is on group road rides if I am on the left side, I get a bit leary when I pull off the front, I manage but its a bit scary. Riding pacelines on the road or being in a pack doesn't scare me or cause me too much grief, I ride with the local fast group weekly and its not my eyesight that ever causes me any problems.

My opinion of it is that I have figured out how to tell distances (i.e. perceive depth) without actually being able to do so but I have done it in a non-convential way. I am very happy with my eyesight the way it is, and would be highly reluctant to have it corrected even if someone came along and told me it could be corrected with minimal risk.

Let me know if you want any more feedback. Happy to lend an opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
ZenRider said:
Get yourself an eye patch. Put it on and go ride your bike. Then write your article after you have first hand experience.



Zen

:)
Swain: An eye patch would simulate having vision only in one eye - I wish to have the observations and coping strategies of someone who lives their life and bicycles with only one good eye.

I associate with many whose ability to hear is very limited - they use a variety of ways to communicate based on physiological build, cultural patterns within their peer groups, wealth and use of appropriate technology or surgery.

Please provide citations or specific references to verifiable sources when possible - that is most helpful. ;-) Swain
 

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Swainwashdc said:
Please provide citations or specific references to verifiable sources when possible - that is most helpful. ;-) Swain
Isn't that your job if you are writing the article? More than happy to help, but you gotta step up here too.
 

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Wizard of the Trail
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When I was born, I had two good eyes. However, I then got a problem called hemangeoma. I doubt it is spelled right. It covered the upper left side of my face and my left eye, which pretty much ruined it. I had to go for radiation treatments and an eye operation to stop the growth and expose the eye. After that, the radiation stunted my growth and had to get growth hormones to get taller. I had a tough childhood you might say.
Back to your question, I have one good(right)eye and one eye I can see out of, but I cannot focus and considered legally blind in that eye. I have no problems riding a bike anywhere, but I hate riding on the road because I have a hard time looking behind me.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Helmet or glasses frame mounted mirror used?

Helmet or glasses frame mounted mirror used? When I bike I use a mirror mounted on either my helmet or spatula of my glasses frame. I move my head to allow for a scan of activity to the rear and find it useful. Have you used either or both of these devices? If you have what influenced you to use or not to use same?
 

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Wizard of the Trail
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I only tried a mirror mounted on the left hood of my road bike. I didn't like it because of the vibration the mirror moved too much for my taste.
 

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Swainwashdc said:
I'm researching an article I'm writing on Bicyclists with One Good Eye

My general interests are in accessablity. I became interested in "One Eyed Cyclist" topic after a conversation with an adult who said that he could not ride a bike because he only has vision in one eye. The individual also drove me in his car - one of the safer drivers I have riden with. He has no observable balance problem when walking.

I prefer to hear from cyclists who have good vision in only one eye or persons who are knowlegable on the topic. In avionics technology there is Distance Measuring Equipment to help determine distance from objects. My thought is there may be someone using technology or adaptive skills to compensate for the lack of biocular vision and judging depth of field.

Please, respond before the end of August 2005.
A friend of mine in Austin lost an eye to illness, and he still rides. You can find him on the Austin VooDoo page of bikemojo.com. His screen name is dburatti. I sent him a PM with an Xpost to this thread.
 

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Only for close ups

Walt Dizzy said:
Can't remember where I read this, but binocular vision only provides depth perception for a limited distance. Off the top of my head, it's something like 10 ft or so.

The reason is that the amount of difference between the images provided by eyes separated by 3-4" drops to nothing over distances much greater than that separation. Sorry I can't provide a link.

Walt
I like that point.

There is a way to simulate binocular vision, move your head 3-4" left-to-right. The way objects change in relation to each other is the effect of binocular vision. With one eye you have to be more conscious of the effect.

That leads to my main point. When biking you are in constant motion so the relationship of objects is constantly changing, near objects move so you can see behind them. Objects off your axis of travel change their axis-angle faster the closer they are. This happens whether you have one or two eyes. I guess it's an open question how much of this becomes an automatic process or conscious effort.

It's sort of a problem that when a person with one eye stops to consider a difficult section he has less information than when he is moving! Otherwise a one-eyed rider should be able to equal a binocular rider.

I've ridden by moonlight, you can't focus on details in the trail (thus no binocular vision) but you can still ride. So the brain is coping. (Actually that kind of riding has taught me that details are distracting)
 
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