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I love to read in my spare time and often read about sports in which I have an interest. I have not read much in the way of cycling books, however, and would be interested to know what classics are out there that people would recommend. The problem I have is that when you go to a Barnes and Noble or Books-A-Million here in the U.S., you are going to find that the majority of books are about Lance Armstrong and are written by those associated with him in some way. Now that isn't necessarily a bad thing, and I have read a couple, but I don't want to read the same story from a slightly different perspective a dozen times.

So what cycling books are considered classics or would anyone suggest?

(Some of the books I've read so far regarding cycling are The Cyclists Training Bible and The Mountain Bikers Training Bible by Friehl, Mountain Bike Like A Champion by Ned Overend, and a book Lance Armstrong co-wrote with someone).
 

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I was going to suggest Mountain Bikers Training Bible :). I also own Mastering Mountain Bike Skills by Lee McCormack and Brian Lopes; if you're into that kind of stuff (lots about how to navigate things correctly) / want to be better at riding (or, like me, read about how one could theoretically be better at riding) then it's a nice read.

That's all I got.
 

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Slightly different angle, but I read a book by "the Steel Cowboy" (I forgot his real name, but googling that should find it). He has a few books that are just journals of his tourning all around the world. Stories from riding with locals in Mexico, to drinking with locals in Ireland, to roughing it in the Australian desert, to etc... Light read, entertaining.


Also, I can't remember anything about the name of the book or guy, but I read one about a guy who rode accross america in the early 1900's. The pneumatic wheel was just invented, fully rigid bike/fixie, 'cause that's all there was. Biggest challenge was finding suitable roads, and finding a place to rest his head. The book was written by his grand daughter who found his memos and did a bunch of research. I think there is something about "yellow fellow" in the title, or that was the bike he rode, or both.
~Another light, but interesting read.

I found the second one in our public library, and checked it out for Sh!ts and giggles, but liked it....
 

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bmateo said:
Slightly different angle, but I read a book by "the Steel Cowboy" (I forgot his real name, but googling that should find it). He has a few books that are just journals of his tourning all around the world. Stories from riding with locals in Mexico, to drinking with locals in Ireland, to roughing it in the Australian desert, to etc... Light read, entertaining.
You're thinking of "Metal Cowboy", who contributed to Bicycling Magazine some years back; Name's Joe Kurmanskie, and he writes a good short story; makes a scene come alive for you. I believe he has three books out now. I have he first, "Tales From The Road Less Pedaled", and plan to ge the others as soon as I can.

Less vivid of a writer, but still passionate about the ride, is a man named Stan Purdum -- editor of a midwest periodical, ordained minister (he doesn't preach when he rides or writes about riding). He has, I believe, two books out.

Michael Keefe is a humorist who wrote an absurdly funny little tome called "The Ten Speed Commandments"; it's good bathroom reading, some of his outlandish ticklers will make you sh** yourself.

I 2nd Bob Roll's books, as well. Bobke is a timeless character.
 
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