Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I managed to score a decent deal on a new old-stock Intense Spider, which has cantilever brake braze-ons on the rear triangle. I won't be using them, and will want to remove them. The easy part would be to dremel off/remove just the pivot, and then apply plugs. Though for a smooth look (plus, I'll have the frame repainted), I'm tempted to dremel off the parts in their entirety. Outside of doing a clean job, are there any structural considerations in doing the latter? I do know that welding does affect the underlying tube's metallic microstructure and strength.

Thanks much, & Happy Holidays! :)
 

·
Randomhead
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
I'd really be curious what you think you might have to do?

There should be no problem just carefully grinding them off. What are you going to use for brakes?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes, the plan is to grind them off, first by dremelling off the bulk of the brake bosses, and then to burr down the stump.

The rear triangle also has disc brake tabs, and I'll just have those for the rear. ...Should be a nice ride when I'm all finished!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
As I said in a previous post about cutting frame tubing...
Hacksaw as much as you can off first.

Grinding the whole thing off is fine, but if you don't dip the area in water to cool it often, you have a risk of lowering the strength. Grinding is removing metal by abrasion. Abrasion = high friction = accumulated high heat = bad.

Two ways these could be attached:
1) brass brazed. When you get to the joint (under the paint) it will be yellow/gold. In this case, I would suggest cutting off the main canti post with a hacksaw and then filing with a #1 cut Swiss file 6" size. File it *carefully* down to try and not thin the stay itself.

2) Tig welded. The weld bead will be very hard. Harder than the rest of the stay/post. You may have trouble filing the bead. I would still probably try and file it. Grinding can remove more material than you intend. By hand, it is a tenuous task indeed on a pencil-diameter tube such as a stay. I would tend to think this might not be worth it.

Are they really that objectionable??

Lastly, if you just care mostly about the aesthetics (how could your request not?), you can file off just the smaller diameter of the post. File the portion left flat. Find someone to make you a little plug as you mention. When it gets repainted, have the painter also color the plug. Call it a "custom feature". (queue: everyone gets jealous ;) )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,459 Posts
I cut a set off one of my frames a few years ago. It is absolutely no big deal. Hacksaw, and then files. You could use a grinder too, but as was said, don't cook the metal.

Drew
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Ah, thanks for the heads up on controlling the temp. Ya, the last thing I'd like to do is to anneal the stays themselves, lol.

Indeed, I can just remove the pivots and call it a day. Though, I do plan on having the frame repainted, and getting the stays smooth seems ideal to me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Potentially, yes. In general though, resale values of used bikes tend to be horribly low, even in ideal circumstances. For example, this very frame I purchased new is old-stock from several years ago; I bought it for less than half of its original value, and I still think I may have been too generous in my offer!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ha, I finally took the plunge. To all the folks who recommended a hacksaw, great tip! I initially tried a dremel, but the tool that is oh-so-good with carbon handlebars is more noise than effect with this job. The hacksaw was slow but deliberate. There also was much less concern for falling off target and cutting an unintended area. Now I have the tabs as 1mm mounds on the seatstays. After a trip to the hardware store tomorrow, I hope to file down close to all the remainder. ...Thanks again!
 

·
Relax. I'm a pro.
Joined
·
1,464 Posts
I Dremeled two brake mounts and two cable guides off my new BMX frame yesterday. The Dremel is fine if you have it lying around. Now I'm filing those areas smooth before I get the frame powdercoated.

Just this little job puts into perspective the hours and hours of filing and cleanup that you pros do. I still want to build my own frames eventually, but I have zero desire to sell them to anybody. I just want to experiment with design and geometry. I'll keep my day job.





Edited for grammar & whatnot.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top