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saddlemeat
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We get several big Ponderosa pine blowdowns every year and since no one wanted to take the FS chainsaw course, we ordered this from an outfit in New Zealand that makes racing saws. We ordered a 48" work saw with two handles and it arrived yesterday. After a few strokes on a big 18" log it is apparent that this is one cuttin' saw. It is razor sharp so it will go to the local saddlemaker for a custom sheath that can be strapped to a bike frame.
 

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Nice Saw! Folks forget that this was state of the art wood cutting not that long ago.

People are frequently surprised at the size of many trees that are easier to take 10 minutes to cut by hand without lugging in a chainsaw and PPE.
 

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Terrain Sculptor
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Nice looking saw. I'm somewhat of a fan of old woodworking tools. These 3 were given to me by a nice lady who owns an antique shop. She's afraid of sharp things so she asked me to take them away.

View attachment 551950

She has also given me a brush hook, a froe, a draw knife, 2 broad axes, several machetes, sickles and a scythe. What a nice lady!
 

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I used to cut down trees with my dad using a two man saw then cut the wood up for fire wood, Nowadays it's the green thing to do cause the two man saw runs on a renewable fuel source.

I remember when chain saws first hit the retail market.

How much was that bad boy?

I still have my dad's old saws, maybe I'll get them sharpened...
 

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I need skills
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nice looking saw

this link has been posted before. The USFS has free dvds that demonstrate, among other things, how to use, sharpen and maintain hand tools, such as the saws above. The dvd is surprisingly interesting.

look for:
Trail Training DVD Series: DVD 1 Includes: "Handtools for Trail Work" and "An Ax to Grind." DVD

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/rectrails/trailpub.htm
 

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Machine Trail Builder
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Misery whips.... make sure the sheath is a good one. I've seen a nasty accident on just the hike into the backcountry involving a cross-cut saw, not sure how I feel about strapping one of them to a bike. Show us the sheath when its done if you can.
 

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saddlemeat
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's the SS way...

Fletcher-Love said:
Misery whips.... make sure the sheath is a good one. I've seen a nasty accident on just the hike into the backcountry involving a cross-cut saw, not sure how I feel about strapping one of them to a bike. Show us the sheath when its done if you can.
Don't know how much time you've spent running a chainsaw, repairing a chainsaw, buying chains, gas, oil, and protective gear for a chainsaw, smelling a chainsaw, listening to a chainsaw, but I have spent plenty of time and money doing that and no more thanks. This is a simpler, easier, and more aesthetically pleasing way of accomplishing the same thing.

We have an excellent local saddlemaker who has done some projects for me so I'm not too worried about safe transport, but you are right about safety, that saw is literally razor sharp. :eek: I will post a pic of the sheath, which I expect will be as elegant as the saw.

I'm also picking up a Fanno No. 30 Bull Saw for smaller stuff, unless someone knows of something better.

I resolved to only have one engine in my life and the position is currently being filled by a pickup truck. :D
 

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saddlemeat
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jim311 said:
I actually do pretty well with a small folding hand saw surprisingly.
Walks right through those 12"ers right? I already know about small folding saws... I was thinking more along these lines:

http://www.mendotatools.com/Timber-Saw-P159C32.aspx

I've got big trees to deal with, like up to 48". There are Ponderosas up to six feet in diameter around here but four feet is about the biggest I've seen near the trails, and one is fixing to fall any day now. That four foot Tuatahi saw in the pictures above IS a small hand trail saw in my neck of the woods. :D
 

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Masher
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We build alot of bridges out of PT lumber, we precut the decking into 24" pieces and hump them in, and carry 10-12' 4x4s for stringers full length and cut them on site. But I don't have the chainsaw certification to use in our state park - always relying on another guy that does have it, and hoping he shows up...
I was thinking of buying one of those 28" Timber Saws for trimming the stringers, I imagine it would slice thru a 4x4 pretty fast?
Love the old tools!!!
 

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saddlemeat
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
fishbum said:
We build alot of bridges out of PT lumber, we precut the decking into 24" pieces and hump them in, and carry 10-12' 4x4s for stringers full length and cut them on site. But I don't have the chainsaw certification to use in our state park - always relying on another guy that does have it, and hoping he shows up...
I was thinking of buying one of those 28" Timber Saws for trimming the stringers, I imagine it would slice thru a 4x4 pretty fast?
Love the old tools!!!
Cutting pressure treated lumber can be hard on steel blades (same for chainsaw), but other than that it will work fine. WD40 could be your friend. I'm sure you will find hand sawing is less work and stress over all. :thumbsup:
 

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Machine Trail Builder
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I actually like the smell of chainsaws.... but your right, a well sharpened misery whip does the job and it is pretty satisfying hearing every pop and crack as you cut through a large log. Back when I worked for the Forest Service we spent a lot of time in the backcountry logging out trails in the with crosscuts. We used old fire hose to cover the sharpened end of the saws and would carry them on our shoulders on the straps of our backpacks. One of our crew members tripped and the cover had dislodged a bit and cut him square across the back of the neck.... one nasty cut! Speaking of sharp, do you have a professional around to sharpen that beauty? There don't seem to be very many of them around anymore and I've heard there is a real technique to sharpening them correctly.
 

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Big Gulps, Alright!
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Our club bought a 36" bowsaw from ForestrySuppliers.com. In part to cut out deadfall, but also to build structures like bridges and ramps and things - stuff where repeated use of a smaller saw would tire you out pretty quick. Works well. We do need to get a sheath for it - the one it came with sucks. As is we just carry it out to wherever we need to use it.
 

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bsieb said:
We get several big Ponderosa pine blowdowns every year and since no one wanted to take the FS chainsaw course, we ordered this from an outfit in New Zealand that makes racing saws. We ordered a 48" work saw with two handles and it arrived yesterday. After a few strokes on a big 18" log it is apparent that this is one cuttin' saw. It is razor sharp so it will go to the local saddlemaker for a custom sheath that can be strapped to a bike frame.
That is a beautiful saw. Checking out their site that company makes some nice stuff.
 

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Off the back...
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One of our guys picked up a Silky Katanaboy, and it's damn near perfect for the deadfall we get around here. We rarely see anything bigger than 24", but one tree will bring several smaller ones down with it. The Silky just zips through it all with ease.
 

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saddlemeat
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Fletcher-Love said:
I actually like the smell of chainsaws.... but your right, a well sharpened misery whip does the job and it is pretty satisfying hearing every pop and crack as you cut through a large log. Back when I worked for the Forest Service we spent a lot of time in the backcountry logging out trails in the with crosscuts. We used old fire hose to cover the sharpened end of the saws and would carry them on our shoulders on the straps of our backpacks. One of our crew members tripped and the cover had dislodged a bit and cut him square across the back of the neck.... one nasty cut! Speaking of sharp, do you have a professional around to sharpen that beauty? There don't seem to be very many of them around anymore and I've heard there is a real technique to sharpening them correctly.
That's a good point; sharpening and related maintenance. Jo (Tuatahi) asked if I planned to sharpen it myself or have it done by a professional and I told him I would sharpen it myself. I am a retired carpenter/builder and have done a lot of timber framing, log framing, and joint carving and I know how to sharpen tools and file saws. But my real plan is to see how often we use it, how often it needs resharpening, then either get Tuatahi's sharpening jig (costs as much as the saw) or just send it to a pro, probably a pro that sharpens Tuatahi's. I don't know how many cuts I can get from a sharpening yet. Could be a once every five year thing or an annual thing. I figure if I get a smaller saw and use this one only when neccessary it will be awhile before I have to deal with that. Especially if it has a good case and is kept oiled with t90. Then again, we might start racing it, there has been talk of saw races at our 3 day annual party. :D
 

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Terrain Sculptor
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Berkley said:
Our club bought a 36" bowsaw from ForestrySuppliers.com. In part to cut out deadfall, but also to build structures like bridges and ramps and things - stuff where repeated use of a smaller saw would tire you out pretty quick. Works well. We do need to get a sheath for it - the one it came with sucks. As is we just carry it out to wherever we need to use it.
Garden hose works for bow saws. A couple of pieces of velcro will hold it in place.
 
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