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We’re starting to vaccinate the Tier Two folks, >70yo, I volunteered for a shot clinic this weekend, 1200 shots available.

I got my second shot today, feeling great, two weeks from now I’ll be unleashing my super powers!

ie we’re going to eat inside a restaurant 😆
 

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That's great news . We completed our second round of vaccines on my units for the veterans on January 12.

This photo of Mr B a veteran on my unit, just 2 weeks shy of his 108th birthday (January 26) , he is receiving his second Covid vaccination. I am very proud of our team providing exemplary care for Mr B and our unit veterans (who all received their second dose). The average age of veterans on my 2 units is 97 and they all consented to receive the vaccine.

1912595


I can't outshine a 108 year old veteran from getting his second Covid-19 vaccination... but I got my second dose of vaccine on January 13. I did not have any side effects (except a sore arm) although a couple of my staff reported headache and malaise which subsided in 24 hours. I'm feeling good and hopefully contributing to protecting others who are vulnerable. Science prevails
 

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I got my second shot today, feeling great, two weeks from now I’ll be unleashing my super powers!

ie we’re going to eat inside a restaurant 😆
From what I've read, the vaccine will not keep you from catching the virus, nor will it prevent you from spreading it. It will only reduce your chances of getting severely ill. Therefore, until a minimum of 70% of the population have been given the vaccine, you should not go eat inside at a restaurant. You should still wear your mask and socially distance, even if you've had the vaccine.

If this is incorrect, please direct me to a good scientific source that supports the contrary. Since there is still very little understanding of sars-cov-2 and the efficacy of vaccines, and much of the reporting is contradictory, it's difficult to know what to believe. However, if the vaccine does not stop transmission, it is very very important people know that. I'm surprised there has not been more effort to disseminate that fact.
 

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My ex wife got it today:

"I got it yesterday morning. My arm has been killing Me worse and worse all day. By about midday my joints started to hurt. Now I have chills and feel like I have a fever despite the thermometer saying 98.6"
 

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I'm in Colorado, and we began vaccinating 70+ several weeks ago. I work for a healthcare system so I've had both my shots as well. Pretty sore arm both shots (Pfizer). I had a slight headache first shot, but not sure if that was related or not. Some have had a pretty rough go with the second shot, about 1 in 5 from what I've heard.
 

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I'm in Colorado, and we began vaccinating 70+ several weeks ago. I work for a healthcare system so I've had both my shots as well. Pretty sore arm both shots (Pfizer). I had a slight headache first shot, but not sure if that was related or not. Some have had a pretty rough go with the second shot, about 1 in 5 from what I've heard.
I only had a sore deltoid muscle for 24 hr after my second dose

Out of the 400+ veterans over age 89 that were vaccinated (with Pfizer) at my hospital only 3 had any side effects (joint pain and fever) More staff c/o reaction (average age 40-50)
 

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From what I've read, the vaccine will not keep you from catching the virus, nor will it prevent you from spreading it. It will only reduce your chances of getting severely ill. Therefore, until a minimum of 70% of the population have been given the vaccine, you should not go eat inside at a restaurant. You should still wear your mask and socially distance, even if you've had the vaccine.

If this is incorrect, please direct me to a good scientific source that supports the contrary. Since there is still very little understanding of sars-cov-2 and the efficacy of vaccines, and much of the reporting is contradictory, it's difficult to know what to believe. However, if the vaccine does not stop transmission, it is very very important people know that. I'm surprised there has not been more effort to disseminate that fact.
Despite being vaccinated, all front line staff at our facility are require to continue to have a weekly covid test. A negative test will lead to 2 weeks being quarantined (vaccinated or not) We wear full PPE and will continue this practice indefinitely.

Our province (Ontario ) is still in lockdown ... since December 26. We are mandated to wear masks in any building/workplace that remains open , practice social distancing. Things appear to be improving. We are seeing a gradual decrease in province wide cases. The regions hardest hit are the most densely populated and places of work. Our hospital continues to have a dozen or more cases in ICU and a full infirmary unit with active cases

The lockdown is working and the place of greatest transmission is workplaces
 

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Wife and I are scheduled for our first vaccine on Monday. We will see if the expected shipment of the vaccine actually arrived.

On a side note, it took me 23 days of skiing so far to finally figure out how to wear my mask, glasses and goggles while skiing and not have them fog up. Little things like that are a big accomplishment this season.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
From what I've read, the vaccine will not keep you from catching the virus, nor will it prevent you from spreading it. It will only reduce your chances of getting severely ill. Therefore, until a minimum of 70% of the population have been given the vaccine, you should not go eat inside at a restaurant. You should still wear your mask and socially distance, even if you've had the vaccine.

If this is incorrect, please direct me to a good scientific source that supports the contrary. Since there is still very little understanding of sars-cov-2 and the efficacy of vaccines, and much of the reporting is contradictory, it's difficult to know what to believe. However, if the vaccine does not stop transmission, it is very very important people know that. I'm surprised there has not been more effort to disseminate that fact.
It’s the same with most vaccinations, so if you previously stayed inside, took the flu vaccine, and wore a mask during flu season, sure, that makes sense.

It’s your comfort level that matters most to you, so do what you feel is right.

if a vaccinated person were to acquire the virus, they woul not get sick or they would have reduced symptoms, which means reduced viral load.

Kerp in mind that even with 80% immunity (that’s the current level needed to remove all precautions), this virus is here to stay.

At work we’re gonna wearing masks for a while longer ....

As medical providers, our exposure is quite high, not unlike any community acquired illness. I’m honestly surprised that I haven’t gotten sick; I have been pretty careful 👍

PS: let’s keep this thread non confrontational so it doesn’t get closed by admin.

My suggestion is to only make one response to a post you disagree with, then let it go.

There are many ways to slice an apple ...
 

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From what I've read, the vaccine will not keep you from catching the virus, nor will it prevent you from spreading it. It will only reduce your chances of getting severely ill. Therefore, until a minimum of 70% of the population have been given the vaccine, you should not go eat inside at a restaurant. You should still wear your mask and socially distance, even if you've had the vaccine.

If this is incorrect, please direct me to a good scientific source that supports the contrary. Since there is still very little understanding of sars-cov-2 and the efficacy of vaccines, and much of the reporting is contradictory, it's difficult to know what to believe. However, if the vaccine does not stop transmission, it is very very important people know that. I'm surprised there has not been more effort to disseminate that fact.
Keeping my eye on the news coming out of Israel. They bought a lot of vaccine up front and already have 19% of their population vaccinated. This is greater than any other country to my knowledge? Here in Oregon they're proposing stretching out the second dose as this would allow more people to receive the first round of vaccination. The prevailing wisdom being that the first dose still provides something like 80 to 90% efficacy. Yet, in Israel, they're in part explaining the continued infection rate among the vaccinated to not having received their second dose. There's a lot of competing information out there.

Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
 

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I'm an essential employee and in the current round here in New Mexico. I can't wait for the day when I can get mine. My girlfriend is a health care worker and obviously I was very concerned she would bring the virus home. Since I can't telework, I can only hope they get to my group as soon as possible (there are subgroups within a phase).
 

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My ex wife got it today:

"I got it yesterday morning. My arm has been killing Me worse and worse all day. By about midday my joints started to hurt. Now I have chills and feel like I have a fever despite the thermometer saying 98.6"
Update this morning:

"Well, at least it was short lived. I feel totally normal this morning. My arm still hurts but not like it did."
 

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From what I've read, the vaccine will not keep you from catching the virus, nor will it prevent you from spreading it. It will only reduce your chances of getting severely ill. Therefore, until a minimum of 70% of the population have been given the vaccine, you should not go eat inside at a restaurant. You should still wear your mask and socially distance, even if you've had the vaccine.

If this is incorrect, please direct me to a good scientific source that supports the contrary. Since there is still very little understanding of sars-cov-2 and the efficacy of vaccines, and much of the reporting is contradictory, it's difficult to know what to believe. However, if the vaccine does not stop transmission, it is very very important people know that. I'm surprised there has not been more effort to disseminate that fact.

Not exactly accurate. The studies were run with A endpoint evaluation of symptomatic / severe cases. We don't have the data yet (or at-least access to the data as gen pop) to say if it keeps you from getting/spreading it. So we're instructed to continue with the precautions in places until more is known. Hopefully we'll have more data by summer to understand the risk of asymptomatic disease after vaccination.

good op-ed read: Op-Ed: Throw Away Your Mask After COVID Vaccination?
and counter point: Op-Ed: Now Is Not the Time to Relax COVID Restrictions

FYI, i'm front line ED based NP, 2 weeks out after 2nd pfizer. 7 hours after 2nd shot I had notable body aches and difficulty sleeping, but was fine enough by morning the 2nd day. Both shots had me with a sore arm...same as with Tdap or flu shot. I continue to utilize my PAPR with all patients I see in the ED and will likely continue to do so for the foreseeable future.
 

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My coworker got his last Friday with no side effects. I have zero interest in getting mine in the near future, but maybe sometime in the summer at the earliest.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Keeping my eye on the news coming out of Israel. They bought a lot of vaccine up front and already have 19% of their population vaccinated. This is greater than any other country to my knowledge? Here in Oregon they're proposing stretching out the second dose as this would allow more people to receive the first round of vaccination. The prevailing wisdom being that the first dose still provides something like 80 to 90% efficacy. Yet, in Israel, they're in part explaining the continued infection rate among the vaccinated to not having received their second dose. There's a lot of competing information out there.

Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
One dose of the two dose vaccine provides about 50% response rate, but that’s really not an accurate way to look at the vaccine, it’s is not like applying a patch to a leak.

The vaccine provokes an immune response without causing the illness, so one shot might not provoke a substantial response, hence the second dose.

for example:

~ 50% of the folks who receive the first dose of a two part vaccine will have an adequate immune response.

~95% of the folks who receive two doses of a two part vaccine will have an adequate immune response.

Having an adequate” response means your body will not allow the virus to spread as quickly or as broadly because your immune system already knows the virus and is prepared to respond.

Vaccination does not prevent illness, it reduces the degree of illness and reduces the risk of serious illness,

Some vaccines have a longer life, Tetanus lasts ~ ten years, MMR lasts for life, but the flu vaccine lasts ~ six months. Titers can be used to measure immune response, which is how MMR revaccination is determined.

There is a single dose vaccine in trials that may be available in March. Keep in mind that many vaccines are given in multiple doses, so one shot is not always better, though it is easier 🙄
 

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From what I've read, the vaccine will not keep you from catching the virus, nor will it prevent you from spreading it. It will only reduce your chances of getting severely ill. Therefore, until a minimum of 70% of the population have been given the vaccine, you should not go eat inside at a restaurant. You should still wear your mask and socially distance, even if you've had the vaccine.

If this is incorrect, please direct me to a good scientific source that supports the contrary. Since there is still very little understanding of sars-cov-2 and the efficacy of vaccines, and much of the reporting is contradictory, it's difficult to know what to believe. However, if the vaccine does not stop transmission, it is very very important people know that. I'm surprised there has not been more effort to disseminate that fact.
This is not correct.

The vaccine prevents the vast majority of people from the infection caused by the virus. Interpret that however you must. The Pfizer vaccine was 100% effective at preventing severe COVID-19 infection in its clinical trial, but that is just one statistic, not the only preventative effect the vaccine has. Both have been highly effective at completely preventing the infection.

Even after 70% of the public has the vaccine, we still may need to wear masks and social distance; the reason for that is in the next paragraph. It's not like herd immunity is some magic threshold. The hope is that the vaccine will bend the curve down substantially and protect our hospital resources. Herd immunity is not a black or white thing that is automatically achieved at 70% vaccination. I am hoping we have substantial effects from herd immunity far below that. There's also no guarantee, given the nonsense propaganda going around, that 70% of our population will ever be vaccinated.

The distinction you're talking about is called "immunity" versus "sterilizing immunity." Studies show that the vaccines confer "immunity," in that the overwhelming majority of those vaccinated do not contract the infection. It remains unstudied and unknown as to whether the immunity is so-called "sterilizing immunity," which would also prevent vaccinated people from infecting people who were not vaccinated by being asymptomatic carriers of the virus. I have read many perspectives on this, and many experts believe there is a strong reason to believe that these vaccines DO confer sterilizing immunity. The reason you are seeing such strong words of caution is that nobody really knows for sure because the studies are yet incomplete and contact tracing is hard. So we don't know for sure, but if the vaccines do confer sterilizing immunity, and we can be sure of that, the experts will tell us that we can let our guard down completely and go back to normal. The sources you're reading saying that the vaccine does not "stop transmission" are based on the same lack of knowledge. Nobody knows for sure. I wish they'd be more hopeful, but I understand why they think telling us to still take caution is the best decision. The reality is that no person who is vaccinated worries about giving measles or polio or tetanus to anyone else. There's a strong reason to believe these vaccines are the same way, from a theoretical perspective. But until someone has clinical data, they are unwilling to say that. The reason there hasn't been "more effort" is because until they have the data, even if they have a theoretical basis for telling us this, they're not going to say anything other than be careful until they know.

If you re-read whatever sources of information you've been reading, this will all make sense.
 

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Nurse Ben, thanks for the statistics, I like hearing from the frontline healthcare workers. John, thanks for those links, they are interesting reads. My takeaway was that while the vaccine will not eliminate the possibility of acquiring and subsequently transmitting the virus, since the immune response is hastened you'd be transmissible for less time. Further, the vaccine will reduce the total viral load, which would also reduce the potential for transmission. Therefore the one MD who is arguing for reduced masking after being vaccinated was referring to situations that already have minimal risk, like having a meal at home with a small group of other vaccinated people. Which I agree, the risk would be very small in that case.

My concern allies with the other MD who argued for keeping the masking protocol after vaccination. Which is that in public, you'd have no way of knowing if someone without a mask is vaccinated or just an anti-masker. It would just cause additional confrontation, and the careless folks would have an alibi for being careless. Even if you, being vaccinated, are not likely to develop severe symptoms, the unvaccinated people you come in contact with could. And right now that is 80 to 90% of the population is still vulnerable. So it comes down to what I believe has been the point all along, are you concerned just about your own health, or also the health of others, and the population at large? Once the CDC or other authority can confidently say a large majority of the general population has been vaccinated, those concerns would be mitigated.

I'm being long winded, but my point is that I've already seen many people assuming that once they are vaccinated they will be able to go to bars, concerts, grocery store, etc maskless and have complete immunity. I'm dismayed that the effort to dispel such misinformation isn't more aggressive.
 

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I'm being long winded, but my point is that I've already seen many people assuming that once they are vaccinated they will be able to go to bars, concerts, grocery store, etc maskless and have complete immunity. I'm dismayed that the effort to dispel such misinformation isn't more aggressive.
Because they might be right. And don't you hope they are?
 
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