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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an ironhorse warrior 4.0 and I am wondering if this bike could handle a 4-6 foot drop to flat or some slight DHing... it seems like when I catch about 1 foot of air the chain hits pretty hard on the frame and it is sort of allarming and the sound somehow makes the landing feel not smoothe. if that noise did not happen it would feel more smooth for some reason when doing jumps. Someone told me to put some tape there where it hits and i should be fine. Are there any other things that could cure this chain bang on the frame that you know of?

also, do you have to lift the handle bars any more when doing a 2-3 foot drop compared to like a 5-6 if you lift handle bars enough to land on two wheels at te same time if you get enough speed? I see some people like wheelie off the drops to keep the nose high.

Thanks
 

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What year is it?

I know the 09's have the Marzochi MZ Comp. I wouldn't feel very confident dropping 5-6 feet on that fork. If you do, I don't think it will last long at all.

Yes, you should definitely get a chainstay protector. There are various ones out there. Lizard skin makes a nice neoprene one that you just velcro on. Other companies make kelvar or carbon fiber stick-on protectors that you can place where you need them.

Chain slap is an unfortunate byproduct of riding. This happens due to the various componetry and riding style. One big cause (of course, not the ONLY cause) is having a long-cage rear derailleur. This just allows the chain to move much more on jumps or more extreme terrain. But this can also happen due to the quality of the componetry. If I remember correctly, your 4.0 has an Acera rear derailleur, correct? That's pretty low-end from Shimano's product line. The quality just isn't the same as XT or XTR stuff. This too plays a part. But again, chain slap can be caused by a variety of things. Derailleurs, chains (old stretched chains), cranks, frame geometry all can factor into why your chain is slapping around.

If you are planning to do DH or anything involving 5-6 foot jumps, you might want to consider a new bike or at least upgrade some components. Maybe go to a short or medium cage rear derailleur. Maybe upgrade your crankset to a 2 chainring/bashguard setup with a chain tensioner (which will also help reduce chain slap). But a setup such as listed above will make for a bit of a worse XC type setup. Each of these components has it's pro's and con's. Do you think you're getting into DH for the majority of your riding? If not, it might not be worth it to upgrade.

But again, this all depends on your budget and what your primary riding is.
 

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the chain slap is because you have an inexpensive bike- get a better RD and it will have a stronger spring and less chain slap. the tape will help too.

as far as the drops go, if they had a good transition, you might be able to handle four feet if you have perfect technique (which you probably don't.)

pulling up on the bars helps, yeah.
 

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I think we should go back
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok thanks for the replies. I want to do mostly DH and of course some trail riding but I really dont care if it sucks on the trail. i am sorry and I am sick of saying this but I am only a kid and I am not going to be able to buy a one thousand dollar bike. I am just not rich. I will try just some duct tape where the chain is slapping and if it is still loud I will try the chain stay protector you mentioned. occasionaly the gears feel like they shift after a landing even though the chain stays on the same sprocket (one of the gears in the casset right?) and chain ring. the chain falls off rarely though. I am new to this and here is the link to the bike: http://www.rscycle.com/2009-Iron-Horse-Warrior-4-0 I honestly do not know why but my bike came with the Marzzochi Bomber MZ Comp. I am almost certain the rear suspension is up to the task with just a few turns of the preload collar so it does not bottom out. The rear coil Fox vanilla shock is made for DH, AM, FR, and XC...pretty much an all around shock. I see some people like leaning there buts back over the rear tire when doing a big drop and if you landed hard and your but catches on the tire your ballz get chewed up...Uggh hurts to think about it. I suspect i won't have to do that on a smaller drop though. Just simply getting speed and pulling up on the handle bars a couple inches I guess right?

One more question. What would you say the first upgrade that would make the most difference to make my Stock (with the bomber fork for some reason) warrior 4.0 to make it a more DH worthy bike? What upgrade would make the most difference and be very noticable and better? I am saying what would component upgrade would make this thing the most steps possible closer to being able to handle that 5 foot drop and be DH worthy.

I know I have asked a lot about biking and I do go out and practice every day but I want to be well educated at what I like to do...
 

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Truth be told, you can't make that bike handle 5 foot drops. It's not a DH bike. There is no one component that will transform it for you. It doesn't matter what shock is on it and how burly it is - you'll break the frame eventually.

Technique for drops: When you hit one, get your weight back over the rear tire. This way you don't really need to pull up with the front. Your weight is heavily rearward which counteracts the natural motion of the bike to nosedive. As you fall, you stand up and move forward again. You don't keep your weight down over the rear tire or you'll eat sh!t on the landing. By moving your weight you can adjust how the bike lands and get both wheels to hit at the same time.
 

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drain bamage said:
Well is there a bike out there under 800 dollars that could handle a 5 foot drop with out going used?
Hmm, that's a good question, w/ FS, I doubt it but there are some good dirt-jump hardtails that are pretty stout. I'm not sure you'd want to drop a five-footer onto flat ground w/ a HT, though, might be pretty rough.

For example, the Gary Fisher Biggn's hardtails are built around a great frame but they're meant more for dirt-jumping than huge drops.

They problem w/ going big on a bike not designed to go big is that it may last for a little while but then it'll break when you least want it to and you could end up w/ big hospital bills when you could've used that same money for a better bike...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok I guess I will rock this thing and work up to the five foot drop or so and when I finally reach it I will already have saved up enough money to buy an Ok Dh bike. Your last paragraph is very convincing. ;) I can totally see what you are saying. I guess if you buy quality in the first place and spend that little extra money over the cheap one the quality is cheaper in the end.


Thanks you for all the advice

I kind of have the want to upgrade my bike...What upgrade would make the most difference and be very noticable and better when I am doing like some DH. I just put some duct tape where the chain is slapping and it went away for the most part.
 

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drain bamage said:
I kind of have the want to upgrade my bike...What upgrade would make the most difference and be very noticable and better when I am doing like some DH. I just put some duct tape where the chain is slapping and it went away for the most part.
I think for DH suspension is probably your best best although good suspension is expensive. Second, probably stronger wheels. In the end, however, i'd just ride it and upgrade as needed if it's worth it but it sounds like you're going to be saving up for a new bike so I wouldn't worry about upgrades.
 
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