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Respect the mustache
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking for a website displaying spoke tension recommendations for mavic rims. I was just at their website and it didn't have much info for building wheels. ANY HELP?
 

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Which rims and spokes and nipples are you using? Spoke tension depends more on the spoke/nipples than the rims. Any Mavic rims *should* be able to take whatever your spokes and nipples can.
 

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Hardtails Are Better said:
Which rims and spokes and nipples are you using? Spoke tension depends more on the spoke/nipples than the rims. Any Mavic rims *should* be able to take whatever your spokes and nipples can.
Not really, The rim does have a lot to do with it. Some of the lighter mavic rims will start to crack around the eyelets from to high of tension. even though you can tension a Dt competition to 185kgf there really is not much of a reason to. 135 to 140kgf is more then enough unless you are using superlight spokes then 120 to 125kgf is a good high number.
 

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You're right, I didn't say that very well. Is hould have said that with a good, strong, eyeleted rim, the spokes are more of a limiting factor than the rim. At least that holds true from my experience. I've had Mavic 517's, 717's and 220's all at about 150kgf, no issues. That's using Ritchey Logic (DT really) 2.0/1.6/2.0 spokes. Aluminum nipples. Acually, I did crack a 717 once, but that was from an impact with a square edged rock, where the tube completely deflated instantly, and the rim hit the rock hard. I was going, oh, maybe 30-35. Don't think I can blame that on the build. The crack wasn't at an eyelet either.
 

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Hardtails Are Better said:
You're right, I didn't say that very well. Is hould have said that with a good, strong, eyeleted rim, the spokes are more of a limiting factor than the rim. At least that holds true from my experience. I've had Mavic 517's, 717's and 220's all at about 150kgf, no issues. That's using Ritchey Logic (DT really) 2.0/1.6/2.0 spokes. Aluminum nipples. Acually, I did crack a 717 once, but that was from an impact with a square edged rock, where the tube completely deflated instantly, and the rim hit the rock hard. I was going, oh, maybe 30-35. Don't think I can blame that on the build. The crack wasn't at an eyelet either.
The 517 was actually notorious for crackly prematurely around the eyelets.
 

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Respect the mustache
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
wheel build

I just built up my first rear wheel with a mavic 517, xt non disc hub, dt 2.0 spokes, and dt brass nipples. I'm curious to see if I used the correct tension: drive side on my park tension meter is 23 and non drive is 18. Do you think this will work, I weigh about 185 if that is part of the equation.
 

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featherweight clydesdale
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DOUBLEJ said:
I just built up my first rear wheel with a mavic 517, xt non disc hub, dt 2.0 spokes, and dt brass nipples. I'm curious to see if I used the correct tension: drive side on my park tension meter is 23 and non drive is 18. Do you think this will work, I weigh about 185 if that is part of the equation.
You'll need to check the Park conversion table supplied with your tensionmeter to get a number that means something to non Park users. The 23 = 95 kfg and 18 = 56 kfg for a 2.0mm spoke.

Ride your wheels as they are for a while. If they start loosing tension, I'd try to raising the drive side first to about 100-105 and then put a partial turn on the non drive side to get your dish correct. I'm guessing you'll end up around 110 kfg and the non drive will be what ever it wants to be. As mentioned, 517's are notorious for spliting early. I certainly wouldn't go past 120 kfg.
 

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Carpe Noctem
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I'd try to get the drive side to 110-120 kgf, the non drive side should be uniform but don't worry about the actual non drive tension.

Don't focus only on lateral, dish or round but try to work all three at the same time when the tension is around 80 kgf, then work the tension up while maintaining the true.

Be patient, if you get frustrated go do something else for a while and come back fresh, don't try to force anything.
 

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My Mavic 519's are built to 123Kg drive, 95Kg non-drive

... using DT 14/15 DB spokes and brass nips. These are fairly high tensions I am told, but I was trying to keep them stiff and from loosening up. The 519's are a beefier rim than the 517/717, so this may be too much tension for you.
 
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