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I would appreciate if anyone can help me with this:

1) Will Copper Anti-Seize harm carbon fibre if it comes into contact with it? (I am not using it on cf, but contamination can happen).

2) Is it safe to use it on stainless steel bolts? (XT brake levers and crank arm have stainless steel bolts)

I am being told conflicting stuff on both questions!
 

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won't harm carbon
safe on any bolt...in fact copper is recommended for stainless steel
I believe there is conflicting information about which is best for which material. I follow Henkel/Loctitte's recommendations which are:

Stainless Steel Substrates
Stainless steel substrates pose numerous challenges when it comes to seizure and galling. Using anti-seize lubricants for stainless steel can help minimize many of these issues and facilitate assembly and disassembly a for maintenance and repair.
However, it is important to remember that while many compounds exist for stainless steel, copper anti-seize on stainless steel will create inter-crystalline corrosion which can cause parts to crack or break when under heavy loads.

Titanium Substrates
Anti-seize for titanium is commonly used in the most demanding aerospace applications and other areas where extremely lightweight fasteners and connectors are used. Anti-seize for titanium bolts prevents galling and corrosion, and nickel-based compounds are usually exceptionally effective in these areas.


Far more common of a issue on bikes (and really a non issue given the low relative loads and conditions most bikes are exposed to) is improperly using grease where anti-seize should be used. Anti-seize should be used on all bolts that are not loctited and threaded bottom brackets. For press in bottom brackets, some manufactures recommend anti-seize, some grease, some Loctite. The general rule is you use grease where there is metal to metal contact that should move (i.e. bearings) and anti-seize for metal to metal contact where there should not be movement, except for during installation and removal.

And just to delve really down the rabbit hole, when torqueing bolts, it should always be specified whether the torque is a dry bolt or lubricated (i.e. wet). Unfortunately few manufactures specific this, but generally I assume the torque spec provided is a wet spec.
 
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^That's been my understanding with copper anti-seize and stainless in the high-end fixture world... no bueno.

In my opinion stainless makes a poor fastener for a mountain bike anyway. I do use titanium though and thus far blue loctite has prevented any galvanic corrosion or seizing.

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unless you do an assay on the stainless to prove some defect will occur just use copper it'll be fine...ime

but yeah, why anti-seize and why stainless anyway ? grease should be good for most things...polylube or marine grease...stainless is kinda rubbish as a fastener...what specific bike part is using it ? I've only worried about anti-seize on titanium
 

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I use copper anti-seize sparingly on most bolts. Bike, Cars, or an anything I want to come apart easily. Grease is also good, both in moderation.
 

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I'm a fan of the marine grade stuff-metal free so you really don't have to worry about galvanic interactions.

I find it's outstanding for SRAM DUB crankset extractor bolts.

I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who's thinking led them to the marine grade, metal free stuff. I went the all-natural route with Lanocote (sheep grease) myself.
 

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Probably won't harm it if you just wiped it off; most finished CF surfaces isn't bare CF anyways.

I work in aviation, including a handful of CF planes(HondaJet, 787, and A350 parts) and I'd say only substance I've ever used on anything that touched CF was sealant. The copper anti-seize is usually for high temp; when I worked on submarines they had both and I was told to use the grey stuff on hardware(both mild and SS).
 

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I use nothing but Ti fasteners along with anti-seize but have always wondered why there isn't an AS for Ti to Ti or SS to SS medical fasteners that are torqued to spec. I rarely see a problem when doing a removal of hardware. Like almost never after years of implantation.
 

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I use nothing but Ti fasteners along with anti-seize but have always wondered why there isn't an AS for Ti to Ti or SS to SS medical fasteners that are torqued to spec. I rarely see a problem when doing a removal of hardware. Like almost never after years of implantation.
Both materials are corrosion resistant by themselves; I'd guess there's no chance of galvanic corrosion since they're going into the same material.
 
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