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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have one of these 12V pumps to check tire pressure for our cars. It is small, neat, quiet and was only $50. Instead of buying a hand pump is there a way to get an adapter for this so I could use this on the bike?
 

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Obsession? Its a Passion!
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A 99 cent Presta valve adaptor at your LBS should do the trick, assuming you are inquiring about presta valves. Those pumps work great, we use them all of the time during races and charity ride events...
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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You should really have a hand pump you can take with you on your rides, and a couple spare tubes. Flats are relatively common, and don't have to turn your ride into a disaster. Doesn't need to be anything fancy, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
AndrwSwitch said:
You should really have a hand pump you can take with you on your rides, and a couple spare tubes. Flats are relatively common, and don't have to turn your ride into a disaster. Doesn't need to be anything fancy, though.
Definitely. This was more about the floor pump. If I can use the car's portable why buy a floor pump? I have already ordered a mini pump. I still have to order some tubes. Btw I just picked up the adapter for a buck. Works great.
 

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Braille Riding Instructor
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No need to buy a floor pump if you already have an air pump with a reliable and accurate pressure gauge. AndrwSwitch is right about the hand pump, though--never leave home without it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Talking about this, what is a good tire pressure? Roughly.

My ride came with the Bontrager XR3 26x2.2 tires. I blew them up to 75psi for starters but they still seem a bit flat. I am 175lbs if that makes any difference.
 

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Braille Riding Instructor
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No, no, no, no. Dear god, no. 75 psi? Let some air out of those immediately. I don't even put that much air in mine when seating the beads.

Pressure depends on multiple factors, including: tire volume, your weight, types of trails that you ride and your riding style.

What's the minimum pressure recommended for your tires (this should be listed somewhere on the sidewalls)? I'd start with that. If you pinch, increase it. If you don't but feel you need more traction, decrease it. But 75 psi is waaaaaaaaay too high. That's almost enough for a road bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hdparrish said:
No, no, no, no. Dear god, no. 75 psi? Let some air out of those immediately. I don't even put that much air in mine when seating the beads.

Pressure depends on multiple factors, including: tire volume, your weight, types of trails that you ride and your riding style.

What's the minimum pressure recommended for your tires (this should be listed somewhere on the sidewalls)? I'd start with that. If you pinch, increase it. If you don't but feel you need more traction, decrease it. But 75 psi is waaaaaaaaay too high. That's almost enough for a road bike.
I thought I have read 60-100 psi but I can't find the page anymore. It had 50 in it from the shop but it looked super flat to me when I was sitting on it.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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That sounds more appropriate to road or hybrid tires.

I ride a 2.2" front and 2.1" rear tire at 25 and 30 respectively. Compared to road pressures, it is a very low pressure. The idea is to let the tire conform to the trail surface. Generally, lower is better until it isn't. :p My front tire pinch flatted on me when I was riding it at 20 psi, and my rear tire had slightly squirrelly handling at 25 psi. So that's how I set my pressures. Feel free to experiment, of course - tire pressure is very individual.

For the sake of comparison, on my skinniest-tired bike, with 23mm tires front and back, I have 80 and 95 psi. This is not too far above the pinch flat pressure, set based on where I felt like I got the best traction and most consistent handling.
 

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Braille Riding Instructor
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Thirty to 50 psi is more like it, Hun. Try inflating those tires to about 30 psi and then take your rig for a ride and see how it feels and handles. As AndrwSwitch said, tire pressure is very individual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will definitely do that. I used to be a road warrior a very long time ago. This is my first mtb ever. The thing just did not look right lol.
 

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psycho cyclo addict
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30 psi or so should be optimal; unless you want to wear a kidney belt on longer rides through rough terrain :D
 
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