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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I have a Revell 250R dirt jumper frame and I was wondering if it is possible(and functional) to turn it into a trials/urban bike? Has anyone done this before or is it generally not done? Like get smaller tires, stiff fork etc.

Thanks.

P.S. Basically make it able to do some of the things in the Danny Macaskill videos.:thumbsup:
 

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You can do that on a DJ bike. Good brakes and a rigid fork and you are set. Lowering the tire pressure a tad wouldn't hurt either. The things Danny Macaskill does are ridiculous and I'm convinced he is not human. Don't try to be superman and think you can do the same right off the bat.

Have fun and be careful!

Also, if you are really looking to get into trials, it's MUCH easier to start on a trials specific frame.
 

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Not sure how advanced of a rider you are but the best way to learn control IMO is to practice your manuals and rollbacks. If you want to get into trials (and just advance as a rider in general) balance is key.

A REALLY good way to get better is to ride skinnies, curbs work great for this. Ride around on the curbs for as long as you can without having to ride off. Once you are comfortable with that, practice hopping on and off the curbs.
 

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I forgot his name, but a pro trials rider actually uses a Giant STP instead of a trials specific bike

I've done something similar. My street bike just morphed over time into a more trialsy bike.
Like others said, real good front and back brake. Also you want bigger tires. Typically trials riders run 2.5 rears and slightly smaller fronts (the opposite of everyone else in this regard).

Also imporant is microdrive.Use 25 tooth or smaller sprocket. Bash guard is a major plus.
Also trials riders run really low gear ratios but that's preference.

Rigid fork for sure.

The down sides with converting is weight-trials bikes are almost always lighter aluminum and bottom bracket height. For trials you want real high, but DJ bikes tend to be lower.



observedtrials.net has a great beginners forum that addresses this more.
 

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If you want to ride trials on a dj bike, the biggest aid you can give yourself is to run a lower gear that makes pedal kicking easier. Once you've mastered the pedal kick trials riding opens up for you to start playing with in earnest.

If all you are doing is riding urban/street... you need to change nothing on your bike and just go ride it. Should be fun!
 

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One thing that I would strongly suggest, if you have the capability, is to run rim brakes on the rear. If you look, many trials bikes have rim brakes on the rear and the reason for that is if you are running a disc back there and your tire slips off something, you run the chance of bending that disc to the point where your wheel won't even spin. Also, you will most likely damage your caliper, you will need a new rotor, maybe more. Disc brakes are great, but if you can, use rim brakes on the rear. Especially since you are starting out. No offense OP, but you will have a few spills trying to balance on the rear wheel, and the last thing you want is that disc to bend and your wheel to lock up while you're trying to save it.
 

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jmmorath said:
I forgot his name, but a pro trials rider actually uses a Giant STP instead of a trials specific bike
Jeff Lenosky! He's the reason I bought my STP.

A few things I did to make my bike more trials friendly:

Industry Nine Rear Hub (engagement is a must!)
32t Chainring with 11-28 cassette (trials use 22t chainring, and 19t cog. So 1.15:1 gear ratio, same as using 32t and 28t cog)
50mm stem, 30mm rise bars

And here's Jeff on his STP:

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow! Thanks a lot for the help everyone, 'specially the tip on U-brakes in the rear.

Could someone direct me to a good website for some wheels, a fork, and a new bar. Don't know much about the middle price-ranged companies.

Thanks again.
 

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FeeRideRules
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sasquatch rides a SS said:
One thing that I would strongly suggest, if you have the capability, is to run rim brakes on the rear. If you look, many trials bikes have rim brakes on the rear and the reason for that is if you are running a disc back there and your tire slips off something, you run the chance of bending that disc to the point where your wheel won't even spin. Also, you will most likely damage your caliper, you will need a new rotor, maybe more. Disc brakes are great, but if you can, use rim brakes on the rear. Especially since you are starting out. No offense OP, but you will have a few spills trying to balance on the rear wheel, and the last thing you want is that disc to bend and your wheel to lock up while you're trying to save it.
good point, but most mod(20" wheeled) trials bike riders run F&R disc brakes
rim brakes are usually only found on stock(26" wheeled) trials bikes

to the OP
make your bike as light as possible and remove your seat(grind the seat clamp tube off) as it will only get in the way, if you don't want to get ride of the seat just slam the post all the way down & run a much smaller, slimmer seat. you can either leave your suspension fork on & make it as firm as you can or swap out to a rigid fork. also get a different stem & handle bars(preferably proper trials type) but keep your current ones for street riding
proper trials stem & handle bars will help you balance more on your rear wheel.
also throw on some light weight down hill tyres & run low pressure(18-25 psi) these will grip onto any obstacle you try to ride.
 

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The best way to make your dirt jumper into a trials rig is to start riding trials with it. Seriously- find a skinny curb and balance on it. Find some rocks and ride over them. Learn to hop in place on 2 wheels. Watch Ryan Leech's 'Mastering the art of Trials' video until your eyes bleed, then go practice what you watched.

Bike setup is the LEAST important part of trials for a beginner. As long as your brakes (front AND back, no discussion) work well, you have all you need to get started. Slam your seat and ride that b*tch.

If you really want to spend some money, get a trials stem and handlebar- for a very long time a standard trials bike was a small XC bike with the seat slammed and a long, hi-rise stem. As you progress you will want an easier gear but that can wait.
 

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rmargoli said:
Hi

I may do the same thing for my son's Norco Havoc. Where did you buy the fork? What did you choose? Do you know of places to buy used?
What about weels? Should i stay with 26" or move to 24"?
pinkbike.com is the largest classified for these types of bikes/parts in the US. There are a lot of rigid forks options but it's important to consider the axle size the bike has now, and the suspension size as you will want a suspension corrected fork. Don't put 24's on a 26" bike unless the bike is designd to take either (some are-most aren't) Keep the wheels the same if you have them. 26" and 20" are the more common wheel sizes anyway. 24 is less common
 

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Just bought an '09 STP zero 3 months ago for the exact same reason as the OP. I'd like to echo the comments about balance and time on the bike. I do a little bit every day (different things) to try to improve different aspects of riding. Time on the bike matters; little bunnyhops every chance I get, trackstands all the time, hopping on rear wheel, etc. So many of the moves you see on videos simply cannot be done with out balance; and that takes time. After you get the balance, then you can get strong enough to pull a move off, once strong enough, then you can work on the timing so you can actually do the move you wanted to do in the first place.

I've given Leech, Lenosky and MacAskill hundreds of views each on youtube.

Another good site: http://www.trashzen.com/
 

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meow, meow.
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This is a good topic. I can second everything Herger said.
I find a full-on trials bike too constrained, no fun on DJ/pump track, very poor in getting to scattered riding spots, too much work to bunny hop well, etc.

mtbmxstreet said:
i saw some video trial that using road bike
It's very likely that rider was Chris Akrigg. He can rip on dirt on a fixie, too.
 

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One thing that I would strongly suggest, if you have the capability, is to run rim brakes on the rear. If you look, many trials bikes have rim brakes on the rear and the reason for that is if you are running a disc back there and your tire slips off something, you run the chance of bending that disc to the point where your wheel won't even spin. Also, you will most likely damage your caliper, you will need a new rotor, maybe more. Disc brakes are great, but if you can, use rim brakes on the rear. Especially since you are starting out. No offense OP, but you will have a few spills trying to balance on the rear wheel, and the last thing you want is that disc to bend and your wheel to lock up while you're trying to save it.
good advice, but the main reason most stock trials riders run (more like ran) rim brakes on the rear (usually magura hydraulic rim brakes) is bc of frame breakage. The huge forces generated by hoping around on the rear wheel with the brake locked up tended to break the rear triangle on the brake side. Most decent trials specific frames these days are built to handle it.

If you are pulling off lots of big rear wheel moves on a DJ frame, something to consider.
 
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