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Harshing my mellow, man..
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just received my Contour HD camera today, and I had some questions about mounting. It came with the mount for a flat surface and then a goggle mount also. But my helmet sure doesn't have many flat spots on it. Does anyone have any ideas that make my camera able to mount either on the handlebars somewhere, or maybe a chest mount? I know that the chest mount would be basically putting me at risk of being hurt in my chest if/when I crash, but I think that the quality of filming would be worth it...maybe. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Harshing my mellow, man..
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
herothedog said:
I've just been using the goggle mount and a velcro strap and put it on the right side of my helmet. It is very snug, no issues with it moving around.

http://vimeo.com/herothedog/videos
Where are you connecting the velcro strap? Are you making it fit just like the goggle strap would? Also, how did you get the little clip piece out of the flat surface mount and into the goggle mount? I can't seem to find how I'm supposed to get that rail out...
 

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locobaylor said:
Also, how did you get the little clip piece out of the flat surface mount and into the goggle mount? I can't seem to find how I'm supposed to get that rail out...
Insert the camera on the rails in the flat surface mount, hold the camera and lever the clip piece out. Also IMHO forget about the handle bar mount - too much vibration to be useful.
 

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Here is a pic of how I have mine. It may not work with all helmets, mine just happens to have slots in the right spots.



Picture is kind of dark... strap just goes through the middle from top to bottom.
 

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Same way here

I used a 2" piece of heavy duty velcro* (and cut down the width just a bit) to the size needed to thread through the goggle strap mount. However, there was still a little play in the mount between to two matting pieces and the velcro; I cut a piece of inner tube (diameter of internal goggle mount) and sandwiched it between the two matting parts.
This took all the play out and it feels quite rigid. I like the side mount above and will give that a try...

*Note - I got the velcro from my battery pack mount of my light and motion lamp (I never used the mount) and preferred to stuff the battery in my hydration pack.

 

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I did the same as MarkHL. It makes an extremely versatile mount - I was able to strap the camera to the side of my Lefty for a nice low angle that shows just a tad of the front tire. I was aslo able to easily strap it to a friends seat tube facing rearward. The possibilities are nearly limitless if you use a long enough piece of Velcro.

I had purchased the vented helmet mount when I bought my camera, and it does serve it's purpose well. Just like herothedog, I mount mine on the side of my helmet - this gets the lens closer to eye level. I've found the camera angle mounted from the top of the helmet is too high and looks unnatural - the side mount is much closer to how your eyes see the action.

You can see these mounts in action here.

-Pete
 

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Harshing my mellow, man..
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ukbloke said:
Insert the camera on the rails in the flat surface mount, hold the camera and lever the clip piece out. Also IMHO forget about the handle bar mount - too much vibration to be useful.
do the rails just pry off? should i just try to force it? I don't want to break it and be out of luck until a new mount comes in, but i want the rail section off of the flat-surface adhesive part.
 

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locobaylor said:
do the rails just pry off? should i just try to force it? I don't want to break it and be out of luck until a new mount comes in, but i want the rail section off of the flat-surface adhesive part.
Yes. Heavy-duty Velcro is holding the piece with the rails to the piece that has the tape for adhering to a flat surface. Just as ukbloke suggested, if you just slide the camera onto the rails you should be able to pull on the camera to separate the two pieces of the mount.

Also, don't be too surprised if the adhesive lets go and leaves the Velcro behind inside the other part of the mount. While I don't know how often this happens to people, it happened to me. I'm sure VholdR would have taken care of me if I had called them, but I happened to have heavy-duty weatherproof double-sided tape on hand, so I just used that to re-affix the Velcro. I have yet to use the flat surface mount, however; I've only been using the rail piece with the versatile goggle mount.

-Pete
 

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locobaylor said:
do the rails just pry off? should i just try to force it? I don't want to break it and be out of luck until a new mount comes in, but i want the rail section off of the flat-surface adhesive part.
Yes, it pries off but in a specific way. Let me try to describe it again. There are 3 pieces - the mount, the camera and then the "insert". The insert clips into the mount, and the camera slides on rails into the insert. The insert has a dial around the outside with a serrated edge that meshes into the mount to allow you to pick an angle of rotation. Look at MarkHL's picture in this thread. There is a tab on the bottom of the mount - nearer the front of the helmet. The other end of the mount has a lip. You need to mount the camera on the insert, and then apply leverage to snap it out of the mount. The side nearer the tab comes out first. You might want to apply opposite pressure to the tab on the mount. There is velcro between the mount and the insert to hold it still. You need to apply enough force to break the force between the velcro and snap it out. It takes a bit more force than you might think is reasonable. It gets easier over time. Frankly I think they should have included two inserts with the camera rather than one. Good luck!
 

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I've been using a simple-strap in combination with the goggle mount. The simple-strap is a little thick and a bit narrow, and it takes a little effort to get it coupled with the mount. On the plus side the velcro is very strong, and the strap folds back through a plastic loop so that you can cinch it down real tight. The plastic loop can get in the way though depending on what you are doing. The strap has a rubber backing which helps to minimize rotation of the strap. I think I'll probably get the vented helmet mount too. As others have mentioned I think side mounted on a helmet is a good compromise between point of view and vibration management. My primary use for the camera is actually road biking, not MTB, and road vibration is a real killer for mounting it on the bike.
 

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Pedalphile said:
I did the same as MarkHL. It makes an extremely versatile mount - I was able to strap the camera to the side of my Lefty for a nice low angle that shows just a tad of the front tire. I was aslo able to easily strap it to a friends seat tube facing rearward. The possibilities are nearly limitless if you use a long enough piece of Velcro.

I had purchased the vented helmet mount when I bought my camera, and it does serve it's purpose well. Just like herothedog, I mount mine on the side of my helmet - this gets the lens closer to eye level. I've found the camera angle mounted from the top of the helmet is too high and looks unnatural - the side mount is much closer to how your eyes see the action.

You can see these mounts in action here.

-Pete
I never rode with it mounted on top and moved it to the side after viewing the post above me. Yeah, my mount did a separation between the mounting piece and backing tape (opposed to between the velcro as designed) before I even got a chance to use it :-{
I heated up the adhesive with a hair dryer and used some super-glue on the 4 mounting lugs and put it back together. Seems to be working, I've separated it several times since, and it's coming apart at the velcro as designed.

Bottom line is: your mount has to be stable. Smack you helmet a few times; if you can see your camera vibrating your video quality will suffer. You have to remove all "play" from your mounting system.

I suspect you could mount the camera upside down on the rails and get it even closer to eye level and then use your video software to flip the picture (i.e., the lense will rotate but not 180 degrees).

I rode with it for about 90 minutes today and didn't have any problems with this orientation. I had it aimed a bit low (enhanced fisheye affect) and have since rotated it up two notches as pictured.

That Fort Rock video is awesome...

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Alright everyone, update time. I got the railing piece off and attached to the goggle mount. I got some heavy duty velcro from a store, and mounted it on the top of my helmet, estimating where i should put it. filmed fine until my bike broke. next question is this, and make fun of me if you want, as i most likely deserve it: i mounted the camera and it was upside down. the video is upside down now. anybody have any tips on how to edit the video to make it right side up? it didn't look like quicktime had a simple button to push to rotate the video...
 

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locobaylor said:
i mounted the camera and it was upside down. the video is upside down now. anybody have any tips on how to edit the video to make it right side up? it didn't look like quicktime had a simple button to push to rotate the video...
Flip your monitor!:lol:

You just need some editing software that's better than the pos I use (VideoPad - I shouldn't call it names, though, since I'm using the scaled-down free version).

Based on reviews here, I'm leaning towards buying Sony Vegas, although I have no idea if it will flip video or not. I would like this capability as it will allow me to mount the camera upside down as MarkHL suggested.

-Pete
 

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Pedalphile said:
Flip your monitor!:lol:

You just need some editing software that's better than the pos I use (VideoPad - I shouldn't call it names, though, since I'm using the scaled-down free version).

Based on reviews here, I'm leaning towards buying Sony Vegas, although I have no idea if it will flip video or not. I would like this capability as it will allow me to mount the camera upside down as MarkHL suggested.

-Pete
Windows Live Movie Maker (free) will flip it... http://download.live.com/moviemaker (Vista or Windows 7 required).
The legacy version of Windows Movie Maker (XP and Vista) will flip it also... Under effects choose "Mirror Vertical".

However first download a free copy of "Any Video Converter" and convert your *.mov file format to an AVI (WMV2 codec) so it can be read by Windows software: http://www.any-video-converter.com/products/for_video_free/ The AVI will play much smoother in Windows Media Player than the *.mov file will play in QuickTime Pro unless you have a very fast computer. The movie looks like it's strobing in QuickTime (to me). If you look at the Movie Inspector it's only playing about 15 FPS (instead of 30).

... should have quoted locobaylor
 

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MarkHL said:
The movie looks like it's strobing in QuickTime (to me). If you look at the Movie Inspector it's only playing about 15 FPS (instead of 30).
Something's not right. I have the free Quicktime player (v7.6.5), and it plays the .mov files off my ContourHD as smoothly as WMP plays a converted .avi, and they play in QT @30 or 60fps depending on recording mode.

-Pete
 

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MarkHL said:
Windows Live Movie Maker (free) will flip it... http://download.live.com/moviemaker (Vista or Windows 7 required).
The legacy version of Windows Movie Maker (XP and Vista) will flip it also... Under effects choose "Mirror Vertical".

However first download a free copy of "Any Video Converter" and convert your *.mov file format to an AVI (WMV2 codec) so it can be read by Windows software: http://www.any-video-converter.com/products/for_video_free/ The AVI will play much smoother in Windows Media Player than the *.mov file will play in QuickTime Pro unless you have a very fast computer. The movie looks like it's strobing in QuickTime (to me). If you look at the Movie Inspector it's only playing about 15 FPS (instead of 30).

... should have quoted locobaylor
thanks for posting this i was wondering how to covert it
 

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Pedalphile said:
Something's not right. -Pete
Refering to my comment QuickTime Pro was only playing my FPS at 1/2 the rate and looked like it was "strobing"

Wow, I'm glad you made that comment -> you were right!

My problem was sort of buried in a layer of obscure menu options in QuickTime. I was not playing the video in "high quality". To fix:

1) Select menu option "Window"<WINDOW>
2) Select menu option "Show Movie Properties"<SHOW Properties Movie>
3) Select from the list "Video Track"
4) Select the Tab "Visual Settings"<VISUAL Settings>
5) On lower right hand side of form check the box "High Quality"

Now my video will play at the correct FPS (before it was only playing at 1/3 to 1/2 and it looked like there was a subtle flash in the presentation)

There's also a "Flip, Rotate" located there that will rotate the video in 90 degree increments that should fix locobaylor's problem.

Thanks for the heads up... >Mark
 
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