Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Pastafarian
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I currently ride a Trek 930 that has been thru many upgrades (has new shifters, really nice brakes, a few other things, all good components). The trails where I like to ride now have a lot of rough stuff...roots, rocks, 2-3' drops and things like that where I'm starting to want some suspension. Would I just be wasting money to have my bike converted to a threadless headset and suspension fork? I'm guessing I could buy a FS bike thats 5-6 years old for about what upgrading my current bike would cost. Would that be my best option?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,034 Posts
TavisB said:
Hi. I currently ride a Trek 930 that has been thru many upgrades (has new shifters, really nice brakes, a few other things, all good components). The trails where I like to ride now have a lot of rough stuff...roots, rocks, 2-3' drops and things like that where I'm starting to want some suspension. Would I just be wasting money to have my bike converted to a threadless headset and suspension fork? I'm guessing I could buy a FS bike thats 5-6 years old for about what upgrading my current bike would cost. Would that be my best option?
as R.Cunningham would say:
Here's how to upgrade the bike: take out the seatpost, and slide it into a new bike.

that's an old bike. you should consider gettin a new frame....easiest way to upgrade is to just get a new complete bike. shop around, winter is the best time to buy, shops are busy trying to dump their 2006 models.

and maybe you can sell the Trek to help pay for the new bike, or just donate it to someone who would love to have it...
 

·
fear this
Joined
·
355 Posts
I have mixed feelings about just selling and buying a new bike. I tend to really get attached to my frames and I'll dump whatever it takes into an old one to keep it chugging along. Of course, you've got to have a great frame to begin with. I have an old Gary Fisher Sugar+ that I love to ride. I've simply been upgrading it steadily as necessary and I find that it's only slightly cheaper to do this than to buy a brand new bike. New bikes also don't come with all the components you'd have hoped for. Case in point, my new Devinci Ollie came with a buttload of crap components on it (anything Daredevil) and I had to spend at least another $1000 to fix that problem (wheelset was the main cost). I'm looking at upgrading my Fisher's fork, converting the rear to disk, and replacing the drivetrain soon. In the end, my bike will outperform an equivalent new bike and will do it for less money. Not a whole lot less money, but still, a little less money than a new bike. AND, I've still got my old frame that I love so much.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top