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Farva's #1
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I'm considering moving to Boise this coming spring. I'm coming from the Front Range/Winter Park, CO.

I have no idea what riding is like out there. XC/freeride/resort riding/BMX? Difficult/easy trails? What type of bike would be best? Light hardtail? 6" trail bike?

Any input would be great. I love all types of riding.
 

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There is some really nice singletrack in the foothills like Jungle said. We also have a velodrome in the progress though there is a lot to offer. It has skills parks, 4x course, dual salom, jumps lines, and a pump track. In the summer there is Tamarack which serves lift service mountain biking.

Here is a overall video of the velodrome and for more pictures on it visit this thread
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=469145&highlight=Boise+park

 

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I think you'll find a lot more "open" trails in Boise compared to the front range. The riding is good, and there is plenty of it.

From town trails are easily accessible. Boise is one of the few cities of it's size where you can ride from downtown and be on dirt trails in just a few minutes. Close to town the majority of the trails are non-technical, and tend to get sandy in the summer time. There are a few technical trails that have been developed recently that are also easily reached from town. For the majority of this riding a light XC bike is plenty. There is as much climbing as you like.

A bit further from town (15-20 miles and 4000 ft of vertical) there is a ski resort that has slightly more technical riding. These trails are really nice, there is a lot to explore, and new trails are being built all the time. You can ride a XC bike, or trail bike and be comfortable. There's also a freeride area being developed, but I'm not srue what the current status is.

Also a new velopark has recently opened in Eagle (one town to the west). There's places to take a BMX or dual slalom bike. A velodrome is also in the works. There's also a dirt jump park in the Boise area. And if you race, there are two local MTB series and a lot of road racing.

If you like road biking, there are a few longed paved climbs near town, but nothing like Colorado. There are plenty of flat roads to log miles though.

Outside of Boise, the Sun Valley, Stanley, and McCall areas have excellent riding. The seasons are short due to snow, but the trails are as good as you'll find anywhere. I visited Crested Butte a few summers ago, and I think that the rides around Stanley are better. These trails can be ridden with a XC, trail or light freeride bike - it depends on what you prefer.

And the rest of the state is mostly empty of people, and few trails are closed to bikes. If you like to explore and don't mind doing hike-a-bikes the possibilities are endless.

Around town bike commuters are common, and in downtown and close to it, you see a steady stream of bikes on most roads. If you stop by a bar for a beer in the summer, it's not uncommon to see 10, 20 or more bikes sitting out front (downtown or the north end only). Overall it's an easy town to navigate on two wheels.

The only thing that we're really missing is the big hit BC style trails. But for XC and trail riding we have as much as you'd like.
 

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Look out!
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Nothing at all, in fact there is an outbreak of swine flu, avian flu, Hong Kong flu, and mad cow disease as well. Not to mention that bikers get run over by a doper and the perp gets 6 month house arrest. http://www.idahostatesman.com/235/story/429979.html The riding here is terrible. Do not believe anything anyone says about Boise. It doesn't really exist. It is a dank dark depressing place that makes Detroit look like paradise. It is way too crowded already. You would be much happier anywhere else, honest. Would I lie? :aureola:
 

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laffeaux said:
I think you'll find a lot more "open" trails in Boise compared to the front range. The riding is good, and there is plenty of it.

From town trails are easily accessible. Boise is one of the few cities of it's size where you can ride from downtown and be on dirt trails in just a few minutes. Close to town the majority of the trails are non-technical, and tend to get sandy in the summer time. There are a few technical trails that have been developed recently that are also easily reached from town. For the majority of this riding a light XC bike is plenty. There is as much climbing as you like.

A bit further from town (15-20 miles and 4000 ft of vertical) there is a ski resort that has slightly more technical riding. These trails are really nice, there is a lot to explore, and new trails are being built all the time. You can ride a XC bike, or trail bike and be comfortable. There's also a freeride area being developed, but I'm not srue what the current status is.

Also a new velopark has recently opened in Eagle (one town to the west). There's places to take a BMX or dual slalom bike. A velodrome is also in the works. There's also a dirt jump park in the Boise area. And if you race, there are two local MTB series and a lot of road racing.

If you like road biking, there are a few longed paved climbs near town, but nothing like Colorado. There are plenty of flat roads to log miles though.

Outside of Boise, the Sun Valley, Stanley, and McCall areas have excellent riding. The seasons are short due to snow, but the trails are as good as you'll find anywhere. I visited Crested Butte a few summers ago, and I think that the rides around Stanley are better. These trails can be ridden with a XC, trail or light freeride bike - it depends on what you prefer.

And the rest of the state is mostly empty of people, and few trails are closed to bikes. If you like to explore and don't mind doing hike-a-bikes the possibilities are endless.

Around town bike commuters are common, and in downtown and close to it, you see a steady stream of bikes on most roads. If you stop by a bar for a beer in the summer, it's not uncommon to see 10, 20 or more bikes sitting out front (downtown or the north end only). Overall it's an easy town to navigate on two wheels.

The only thing that we're really missing is the big hit BC style trails. But for XC and trail riding we have as much as you'd like.
Laffeaux's post pretty much sums it up. The local trails are also perfect if you ride SS... Plus it's a city where you can get a real job and housing is not too outrageously priced.
 

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Back of the pack fat guy
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I love Boise because there are good transvestite lip synch shows, crazy cat ladies, Mormon furniture stores, them internets, manpris in every closet, a Fuddruckers, toe fungus clinics, crunchy kitty litter outlets, drunken cowboys, beer can shootin, Eckanar, the Pleasure Boutique, and roving gangs of destructive elves hopped up on cough syrup and Java lattes.

Oh, and salad bars. Can't forget the salad bars.
 

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TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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Earthpig said:
Let's not forget that Boise is also renowned as the "Midget P0rn Capitol of the World."
Darn. They told me at the door that they were wrestlers.

Stamped the back of my hand so I could get back in without having to pay again.




 

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just a man
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EP - I am a little disappointed. That is NOT the Idaho Pizza Company salad bar is it...?

To the OP: The Boise area is like everywhere else - it is for the most part what you make of it. It's got it's good and bad points. I've experienced more "good" than "bad" in the the 4 years I've been here. The mtb community is pretty cool on the whole.
 

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dont waste ur time

yeah all there is here is buffed out highways overloaded with dogs, kids, and old people. there is no effort being put foreward to expand anything. if fact we are loosing trail every year. bogus is just that and you have to drive for days to find an over grown trail head if you manage to get past the never out of amo ******** the guard thier claim on all of idaho.
 

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Fashion questions for Twisted

TwistedCrank said:
Lest we forget the local cottage industry that was spawned by the acne epidemic of 1997. Chins, chests and chalupas.
Augh back to Merkins. This brings up a question that has been plaguing me. It's now that time of year when the Legislature comes back to town (you know those mental midgets). Since we all want to look our best before the mental midgets, let's ask Twisted for his fashion sense. So the fashion question is, if you are wearing a natural merkin must you stick with a wooden kotekas and like wise if you go synthenic with the merkin is a plastic ornamental kotekas appropriate?

I know just stick with the salad, it's what I know best.
 

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A little crowded close to town BUT

If you take of the blinders and look around you can find some technical and epic riding. If you live in the North End you can ride from your house on endless buffed out trail. You have to go on 2 plus hour rides to get to the fun stuff or drive there.
 
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