Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a stock 2009 Kona Kula, with a Rock Shox Recon SL fork.

The fork seems incredibly stiff for the type of trail I ride (loose limestone rocky, packed soil). I've put up with it for over a year, but I'm wondering whether the ride can be adjusted smoother without necessarily replacing the spring.

I've read through some of the Rock Shox manuals, but am not convinced that if I adjust air pressure in a suspension fork that it will make the ride any more "squishy". Don't even know if that's possible with the Recon SL.

I just don't want to be beaten to death on the trails anymore. Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,293 Posts
elcocopeli said:
I've read through some of the Rock Shox manuals, but am not convinced that if I adjust air pressure in a suspension fork that it will make the ride any more "squishy". Don't even know if that's possible with the Recon SL.
Why not?
That is the very basis of air-fork performance. More air=stiffer, less air=squishier.

Now, when looking at the specs, it appears to me that the SL is a "solo air" version of the fork, and therefor, there is no spring in it to replace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You make a good point.

Shortly after posting this question, I went out into the garage and fussed with the air pressure and rebound settings on the shock.

Surprise! I got the ride I wanted.

One thing I did learn, though, was that a standard tire inflation chuck won't fit over the shock's air valve. I used a 16 gram CO2 I had laying around and a quick inflator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,293 Posts
elcocopeli said:
You make a good point.

Shortly after posting this question, I went out into the garage and fussed with the air pressure and rebound settings on the shock.

Surprise! I got the ride I wanted.

One thing I did learn, though, was that a standard tire inflation chuck won't fit over the shock's air valve. I used a 16 gram CO2 I had laying around and a quick inflator.
Yeah, I would suggest picking up a shock pump for fine-tuneage. I had a dual air RS and ran it at about 55% of body weight for a plush ride...more for stiffer.

Now, glad it worked out for you - what amount of travel were you using before out of the 100mm on the front?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
A floor pump or a CO2 inflator are the wrong tools for adjusting your fork. A high pressure shock pump is the ticket. Ask the guys at the bike shop. Get the pump, find the manual for your fork online and start your pressures at those recommended by Rock Shox and see how you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
CharacterZero:

I'd say about 50mm? The shock was incredibly stiff as set by the dealer. I was too stupid to make any adjustments for a long time.

GrantB:

I didn't know that. I'm taking a trip to some of the local shops today and will see what I can find. Still trying to figure out the whole "negative air chamber" thing...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,837 Posts
If fork is Solo Air equipped, as Mr. CharacterZero suggest, then the negative air chamber is self regulating, and you don't need to worry about it. Also, as has been mentioned, buy a proper shock pump for it. Finally, one of the big benefits of a air spring, aside from it's weight, is the fact you can adjust it exactly for your weight.
 

·
Its got what plants crave
Joined
·
5,933 Posts
Be seriously careful about using a CO2 inflator to adjust pressure. It contains a ton of pressure and is difficult to regulate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was able to set the fork to about 100m travel after procuring a fork pump. The subsequent 25 mile ride was ridiculously different than the year past. Very comfortable, and I can even understand now why folks like their full suspension bikes!

Live and learn, I suppose...

On to the next project.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top