Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Young, Shawn Young
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the Talas rlc. I noticed this morning that if I make the compression harder that my front end seemed to stand taller when I was riding. Is it possible that I had it set so soft that when I was riding it was already into some of its travel making it seem like the front end was lower than it should be. Seems silly but that was the impression that I got,

Shawn
 

·
www.derbyrims.com
Joined
·
6,766 Posts
Rebound too firm?

Redmon said:
I have the Talas rlc. I noticed this morning that if I make the compression harder that my front end seemed to stand taller when I was riding. Is it possible that I had it set so soft that when I was riding it was already into some of its travel making it seem like the front end was lower than it should be. Seems silly but that was the impression that I got,

Shawn
Maybe your rebound is so firm the fork doesn't return up to the static level of sag quick enough after repeated bumps, called "pack-down". Firmer compression damping doesn't allow it to compress as much from bump hits. And over-firm compression compared to rebound can cause the fork (or shock) to "pack-up" and rise to ride higher while riding.

Platform valued shocks and forks are designed to run with softer springs and deeper static sag, due to firmer compression "packing-up" effects while riding.

The RLC is not a platform fork and should be set up to ride at the same average level as a static sag. Static sag is the amount of sag with rider, held still on the bike by an assistant, at normal seated riding position (normally about 20 - 25% travel front and rear).

After setting up your static sag, set your damping by opening up compression and rebound to the softest setting. Then for a base line setting, first adjust your damping in (firmer) only enough to keep the fork from extending repeatedly more than twice upon rebounding from a single big bump (this is usually about midway in the adjustment range of quality shocks and forks such as Fox.). Then set your fork compression only firm enough to reduce overly rapid dive when suddenly braking hard.

Soft damping is more bump compliant and comfortable. Firm up damping to suit your confidence level, setting rebound first with compression at full soft, then set compression in the fork only for brake dive, in the rear only set compression firmer than the softest setting if the bike bob's while pedaling excessively.

For racing or harder riding sessions where your pedaling causes inefficient excessive bobbing or too much wallowing and bucking in bumps, slow your compression damping a click or two (or more depending on adjustment range) only enough to stabilize the handling or pedaling, rebound shouldn't change more than a click (very little) to avoid pack-down and over firm bump handling.

For jump sessions, firm up compression much more and firm up rebound a little more too.

:thumbsup:

- ray
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top