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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who have larger wheel sizes or full suspension bikes, this is an issue that has little importance to you, at least fom a noticeable standpoint. For those of us on 26" hardtails, finding a more comfortable seatpost gets more appealing with every ride. I'm interested in knowing if there's anyone with a 26" hardtail, that has made an upgrade to a comfy seatpost and can say it's made a positive difference. If so, what seatpost did you get? Through looking on the net, it appears carbon, in general, will offer a little more comfort. And setback seatpost will offer more comfort than straight ones. I'm currently considering a Syntace Hiflex p6 carbon, FSA K-Force setback carbon and a Storck. Anyone have any thoughts on these or recommendations for other comfy seatposts? Thanks.
 

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Stand up more. It's not a raod bike, get out of the saddle.
This user is correct. Once the trail starts to get rough you have to stand up. You need to use your arms and knees for suspension. If not you're going to be uncomfortable on ahardtail and that's true about any wheel size. If you're looking for a bike where you can sit and pedal through the rough then get a full suspension.
 

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EAT MORE GRIME
(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻
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I have a 26" hardtail (two) and a hardtail 29'er

USE shokposts work great

CaneCreek Thudbuster ST (short travel) also work great


Though some say you shouldn't sit down so hard on the saddle,
these make a big difference zorbing the inevitable million hits yer taint will get
 

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I would say finding a comfortable saddle is more important than the seat post. I realize this is the Beginners forum, but, you really have to give your rear end time to "toughen up". I think there isn't a huge market for flexing or suspension seat posts simply because its an expense and weight that provides minimal benefit. Thus, grossing very little profit to produce. I believe setback seat posts aren't to provide comfort from dampening, but, to dial in the cockpit by adding options to get your "knee over pedal" position and reach lengthened if needed. This is all coming from a newb who rode a rigid SS for the past year. Oh yeah... stand up more. lol.

That said, Ergon has a newish seat post that does seem to provide a bit of flex to dampen trail chatter while seated. Its the Ergon CF3.
 
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I've got a Fisher Paragon (HT) and a Salsa Fargo (Rigid) both running the same 29er tire size (2.2") but with slightly different tires. The Paragon ride benefits from front suspension motion and some of this is preceptable in the seat. The Fargo ride benefits from a Thudbuster Seatpost, none of which is preceptable in the handlebars. I have swapped saddles and ridden the same terrain with both to say that for long rides (like long commutes or enduro) the thudbuster is pretty good but a good seat fit is more important. Together they work really well, but you add weight to the bike. The Ergon saddle offers a little of both, it comes in various sizes (they have a sizing kit) and it has a limited motion elastomer suspension of sorts. On anything rougher than moderate hardpack you're gonna need to stand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies.

I think i need to add a little as i don't think gave enough info.

Your all right about the saddle, that is probably more important. I am currently on the lookout for a saddle, seatpost and wheelset. I'm looking at losing a little weight and adding a little comfort. I know the improvements to comfort will be small, but that's better than nothing.

As for staying out of saddle, let me explain. It's not trails were i get discomfort. I would always stand through those sections regardless of what bike i was on. It's when im on roads or canal paths and i'm just doing a little fitness or a leisure ride. Were i'll be in the saddle for 2-6 hours. I can't stand for that long, lol. It's after 2-3 hours when i start to feel the discomfort, when small bumps start to feel like big bumps. By finding a more forgiving seatpost with a little flex, as well as changes to saddle and wheelset, i'm sure i can make some positive difference.

My backside is already broken in, lol.. And i use 2.25" tires. I'm not sure how much larger i could go with the tires. I have a xc bike and there doesn't seem like theres room for much bigger. I don't want to reduce the pressure untill i go tubeless because of the added risk of pinch flats.

Thanks again for any advice/suggestions.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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What do you weigh? What tire pressure are you using?

I've done 6-hour endurance races with a 26" hardtail, with tubed tires. I'm not saying this to rattle my saber. I did everything I thought would help to make it easier for myself. I left my seatpost alone and my favorite saddle is a firm and skinny racer shell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm under 12 stone. I don't know what pressure i'm at as i don't have a gauge as yet. I'm doing old school at the moment. I certainly won't release any more air out until i go tubeless due the risk of pinch flats.

I'd just like to add that i don't want to use a dropper post or a suspension post. I'm really only looking for suggestions on seatposts that have a bit forgiveness/ comfort to them, based on users experience. I have looked at some reviews for a couple of seatposts, but would rather have the opinion of users.

Has anyone used a Syntace Hiflex P6 Carbon, FSA K-Force or a Storck seatposts? Based solely on reviews, these seem to be leading the way at the moment, so any shared user experience would be helpfull, thanks.
 

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Part of it depends on what diameter your current seatpost is, and how much is protruding from the seat tube. If you have a 31.6 seatpost, and it's only got four to six inches showing, if all else is equal, it will still be generally less compliant than a 27.2 with ten inches showing.

A well designed carbon or titanium seatpost can have a noticeably more compliant nature than some of the aluminum posts I have used.

To take this a bit further, if you would prefer a more economical solution, and you have a 31.6 seatpost (or any relatively large diameter seatpost), you could get a 27.2 seatpost, and then use a shim. I prefer the longest shim I can find (usually a good four inches in length), and would want it to go past the junction of the top tube/seat tube. The bigger the difference in size, the more noticeable the difference will be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think i do have 31.6? I think what your trying to say is that the thinner and longer the post, the more comfort it will give? I have no idea what a shimmy is, but i'll certainly take the rest in to consideration, cheers!

My current seatpost is an Easton EA30. It's as solid and harsh as you can get. Like changing your car seat for one made of rock! So any post that's more forgiving that people can vouch for is what i'm keen to hear about. Thanks all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I will, lol... I'm going to be getting all that stuff when i get my new tubeless wheelset, which i'm currently on the lookout for. On tubes, i can tell by touch if it's too low or too high.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I don't own a pressure gauge. My floor pump has one built in and it's, at least, repeatable. Changing a flat hasn't killed me yet, though it comes up pretty rarely.

At 12 stone (168 lb?) in 2.25" tires, I was fine with 22.5 psi front/25 rear. Using tubes.
 
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