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Why is there normally not very many if any, options for different colors or color schemes on bikes? I've seen many bikes that I like but I just can't get over the color choice they have. Is this due to overhead pricing or what? It would seem that there wouldn't be much difference in making lets say...3-5 different options for each frame set. For instance the polygon bikes (we will use the T7 and the T8). They are the same frames but you can only get one color choice for each. Is there more to it and I just don't know? 🤷‍♂️
 

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Bikes are mass produced in factories, changing paint out of spray equipment take about 20-30 minutes. Thats a lot of down time for each color change.
If done individually I could see it maybe being a time issue but if they did large quantities as a whole and THEN changed equipment...I mean 20-30 minutes that nets you hundreds or thousands more units sold??!! I don't know, I just feel like for the thousands of dollars people spend on a bike you should be able to choose some different color options or something.
 

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If done individually I could see it maybe being a time issue but if they did large quantities as a whole and THEN changed equipment...I mean 20-30 minutes that nets you hundreds or thousands more units sold??!! I don't know, I just feel like for the thousands of dollars people spend on a bike you should be able to choose some different color options or something.
Lets say they can produce 30 frames an hour on a line. Now, shut down the production of that line for 30 minutes, you now can finish only half the bikes in a hour. No say you offer 4 colors of a said frame, now your line is shut down for 2 hours a day changing paint out. Your still paying all the overhead of the factory for those two hours, and you've only finished 75% of the bike you would have that day.

I'd be willing to bet a lot of marketing time was spent figuring out what colours actually sell.
Color Forecasting Defined
Color forecasting is the practice of predicting what consumers will want to purchase in the near future. There are organizations such as the Color Marketing Group (CMG), the Color Association of the United States (CAUS), the International Colour Association (AIC) and the International Color Alliance (ICA) focused on this task. These groups inform companies on color trends for packaging, signage, and product design. There are even trade shows, such as the ChromaZone®, Conference and International Summit, where color professionals from around the world gather to share their collective knowledge.

Copied from the web, but yes huge amounts of money are spent on color forecasting. As I work for a paint manufacture, we are heavily involved in staying up on trends. Rose Gold was one color that was predicted to take off a few years back, and now look at it.
 

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Go with Orbea or Trek and get the custom color option. It'll cost you, but this way you get to choose from tons of options and combinations:
Otherwise accept that limiting paint colors helps save cost. Paint is labor intensive and costly. Dont look at a budget bike brand (Polygon) and wonder why there aren't a ton of options.
 

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For a production manufacture, every additional option (whether color, different linkages for wheel size, or different rear triangle sizes) adds time, cost, the need for additional inventory, and the greater chance of being stuck with a product that doesn’t appeal to the market. If it were profitable to offer more color choices, they would do so. It is not. For those that need a specific color, some manufactures offer custom colors for an up charge, or you can have your frame resprayed or powder coated (depends on the material and original finish). Mass production lowers prices, customization increases them.
 

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Lets say they can produce 30 frames an hour on a line. Now, shut down the production of that line for 30 minutes, you now can finish only half the bikes in a hour. No say you offer 4 colors of a said frame, now your line is shut down for 2 hours a day changing paint out. Your still paying all the overhead of the factory for those two hours, and you've only finished 75% of the bike you would have that day.
And don't forget up to five frame sizes for each color.
 

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They already have to make multiple sizes.

Add in extra colors and it obviously is going to affect overall cost.

You can always repaint if it bothers you that much.

Or buy a black or raw bike and add colored parts.

Or just go ride and not worry about it. Now if you are talking road bike, you absolutely need to worry about it, as it needs to match the outfit.

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Interesting. That probably explains all of the bright green ski jackets I saw during recent years and the transition to blue that I noticed last season.
The thing I like, is "last year's colors" that aren't cool anymore, are usually discounted heavily the following year. I'm not cool enough or a good enough skier to worry about having the popular color haha

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Color is so subjective. I generally hate all black, but then there are people that loves it. Santa cruz used to let you choose from multiple colors, and mix and match as you like. Some results were disasters.

If trek and orbea looks ok to you, use their custom program to get what you want.

Burn orange bmw looks awesome to me, but many will find it ugly. To each their own.
 

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I think the bottom line is that you could never make enough colors to satisfy everyone, so why cut into your profit to give more options?
I can think of two reasons:

1) I don't think it's so much about truly satisfying anyone, but about giving people an option to rationalize around whatever specific "deal breaker" single color they might be dead-set against.

2) Individuality. I don't know how big of a market this situation might represent... but I suppose it could be something. My and my significant other were acquiring Specialized Turbo Levos late last year. We were glad that instead of being offered in (questionably) gender-specific versions, they were instead being offered in 3 colorways. We were okay with all 3 colorways, but had our preferences... but above all we preferred a colorway that was different from the other person in the household. So we could have some individuality despite acquiring identical bikes.*

* Acquiring identical bikes makes my life easier as the quartermaster/mechanic. Also, it eliminates the "I can't do that because you have better equipment" whine/just-below-the-surface resentment.
 
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