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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Colorado Trail Race
3pm on Thursday, July 19, 2007
Start: Waterton Canyon Trailhead - Denver
Finish: Junction Creek Trailhead - Durango​

The CTR: 500 miles and 60,000' of elevation gain winding through the Colorado Rocky Mountains from Denver to Durango. Approximately 300 miles of singletrack at elevations ranging from 5500' to a gasping-for-breath 12,600'. The CTR is a monster! If the monster is in a good mood, you may experience Colorado's beautiful sunny blue skies and wildflowers blooming as far as you can see! But, be warned - the CTR's mood can change on a whim, and you may just as likely find yourself getting besieged by massive hailstones and lightning bolts. In short, don't come to this race unprepared - no one will be there to rescue you.

The CTR is similar to The Arizona Trail 300, The Grand Loop, and The Great Divide Race. There is no entry fee, no support, no registration, and no prize money. It is an individual time trial: all that is provided is a route description, a suggested start time, and a list of results.

And if you're not already on the edge of your seat, or your heart rate hasn't increased 10 bpm yet, maybe this Official Race Announcement will do the trick!
 

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First off, I have no idea what I am talking about.
Secondly, I have no idea why this race is stimulating me so much since I swore I wouldn't do this kinda thing for years BUT
I'll try to describe this as best as possible.
Why not make a tarp tent using the bike. Use an aluminum axle with a stake welded to it (wheel removed/fork on the ground). The tarp would be staked once at the end opposite the bike and at the ends coming down from the bars. The door would be the slit that the bike frame sits in. Could be made cheap, no floor, lightweight...what am I missing? Using a big enough tarp to begin with it could be done seamless to reduce bulk.
 

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pisspoor drawing

something like this
stakes are yellow
My Bachelor's degree is in art education. How 'bout that?
The scale is off, but you get thepoint.
Too much?
Too big?
Too bulky?
Solving a problem that doesn't exist?
 

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the toninator said:
team td - Tarps are way to heavy if youre looking to save weight. Great design try TYVEK!
Hadn't thought of that. Durable enough for a journey of, oh say a week or so??
BTW: I don't mean to hijack the thread. This is the first self supported stupid thing I have seen that piqued my interests. I am trying to think through the logistics and $$$$'s required to pull it off. One of the reasons I have avoided this type of racing is I don't have much (if any) of the kind of gear required to pull it off.
 

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teamdicky said:
Hadn't thought of that. Durable enough for a journey of, oh say a week or so??
BTW: I don't mean to hijack the thread. This is the first self supported stupid thing I have seen that piqued my interests. I am trying to think through the logistics and $$$$'s required to pull it off. One of the reasons I have avoided this type of racing is I don't have much (if any) of the kind of gear required to pull it off.
Me neithor, pm with anyother questions. Or hit up one of the other threads. Cbarons is probably a good one.

http://www.monmouth.com/~johno/Tyvek.htm

http://www.ultralightbackpacker.com/tyvek.html
 

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Just go ride!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
teamdicky said:
One of the reasons I have avoided this type of racing is I don't have much (if any) of the kind of gear required to pull it off.
Next time you're thinking about entering a 24 hour solo event, think about how nice of a sleeping bag, or bivy sack, or ??? you could buy with that $300 entry fee! :)
 

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Time to go farther
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Gear

Gear doesn't have to be expensive guys.

Right now for less than $250 you can get the big 3 (pack, sleeping bag, bivy) and be very light weight.
For example:
REI Flash UL pack - 9oz ($25)
Montbell UL Bivy - 6oz ($110)
Montbell Alpine #7 ~45deg down - 16oz ($120 on sale at the MB store in Boulder. Old style no zipper. They've got a few that I can buy and ship for anyone interested)

Look around for bargins and good used gear. This stuff is all new but used is even a better deal.
 

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Student of the Bike
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Pivvay said:
Montbell Alpine #7 ~45deg down -
Another question...

I know this is subjective to individual comfort levels but what temp rating bag would be reccomended? Or how about...what is the range of nigh time temps we will be dealing with?

The highest I've camped (summer in CO) has been about 8900ft and it was getting down to lower 40's. How low will (can) it get? I've got a 40* down bag but I'm unsure if I may need a wamer bag, or even a synthetic.
 

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sleeping bag

CBaron said:
Another question...
I know this is subjective to individual comfort levels but what temp rating bag would be reccomended? Or how about...what is the range of nigh time temps we will be dealing with?
The highest I've camped (summer in CO) has been about 8900ft and it was getting down to lower 40's. How low will (can) it get? I've got a 40* down bag but I'm unsure if I may need a wamer bag, or even a synthetic.
Really subjective depending on the individual and even their state. When you're tired you won't be pumping out heat like when you're fresh. I won't be bringing the MB bag but another more custom setup I'm sewing with a similar fill weight of down. I am personally planning to be reasonably comfortable at freezing wearing all my clothes and using my bag/bivy. I'd bet you could get away with less but I'm figuring on a worse case of sleeping up high and being exhausted. Your sleeping bag (and any insulated clothing) is your safety gear in case of trouble. Bivy sacks can be prone to condensation as well so you need to know how to manage your temperature and sweat production which isn't hard but takes a little practice. I've slept totally dry the last two trips in mine in both rainy and dry conditions.

Practice with your setup in as many different conditions as you can. I'll be testing mine in the backyard at varying temperature levels and training states all winter. That way I can bail into the house if needed before having an "oh s*&^" moment on the trail.

Edit: I slept overnight on the CT this summer with just a bivy and synthetic jacket, no sleeping bag. It got down to the high 40s. I slept restfully for 4 hours and on and off for another 4. You can bring a 15deg bag along but it's probably a lot more than you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
CBaron said:
Or how about...what is the range of nigh time temps we will be dealing with?
From my 2006 trip report here:

K.) Temperature Extremes

82F on Segment 3 near Buffalo Creek
40F on Segment 21 at night on Snow Mesa​

However, it was unusually warm during the week I was on the trail. Typically though, I would say no colder than 20F above treeline, and rarely colder than 30F below treeline during mid-July. A bigger worry are thunderstorms and rain. Think about spending the night soaking wet when it is 30-40F. On the last day of my trip (section I of the A-Z), it rained non-stop. I was never really cold, but if I had to bivy that night, it would have been absolutely miserable!

You can glean some other good details if you read that write-up.
 

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Stefan_G said:
From my 2006 trip report
Typically though, I would say no colder than 20F above treeline, and rarely colder than 30F below treeline during mid-July.
Thanks for the info. It sure seemed like you delt with more milder conditions than I would have predicted. We spent a week camping inear Durango (Bolam Pass area) early this July and it rained every day we were there. It rained the enitre last 3 days.

Stefan_G said:
A bigger worry are thunderstorms and rain.
OK, next question then...
Whats the best way to be safe in these types of situations? When we're in CO we usually get up early and are done with our ride before the storms roll in. However, my CT race plan is to be riding most of the day...thus thru the storm period (and at altitude). This makes me very very concerned.

Stefan_G said:
You can glean some other good details if you read that write-up.
Already done...about 3x's now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
CBaron said:
Thanks for the info. It sure seemed like you delt with more milder conditions than I would have predicted. We spent a week camping inear Durango (Bolam Pass area) early this July and it rained every day we were there. It rained the enitre last 3 days.
Yup, I got pretty lucky. A few afternoon/evening rainshowers, and only 1 of 8 days of full-on rain.

CBaron said:
OK, next question then...
Whats the best way to be safe in these types of situations? When we're in CO we usually get up early and are done with our ride before the storms roll in. However, my CT race plan is to be riding most of the day...thus thru the storm period (and at altitude). This makes me very very concerned.
Yeah, this is a toughy. Dangerous thunderstorms (i.e. lightning) are typically in the afternoon that time of year, and the danger is, as you know, significantly higher above treeline. Georgia Pass, Searle/Kokomo Pass, Monarch Crest, and Indian Trail Ridge would not be good places to be during an electrical storm. This was one of the reasons we chose to drop the Coney Summit Segments.

There truly is no completely safe place during a lightning storm. Here's a website on lightning in Colorado.

Fortunately, there's the old saying, "If you don't like the weather in Colorado, wait 20 minutes." I've been in the Colorado high country a countless number of times when the thunder and lighting comes crashing down hard, and then is gone as quick as it came. So, my advice - If the thunder rolls, get back down below treeline as fast as possible and sit tight. It will probably pass.
 

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Last Detour

We never get to TH #22, correct? We continue directly from the 2nd half of the La Garita Wilderness Detour to where it connects to the Coney Summit / Weminuche Wilderness Detour?
 

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This place needs an enema
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Stefan_G said:
Next time you're thinking about entering a 24 hour solo event, think about how nice of a sleeping bag, or bivy sack, or ??? you could buy with that $300 entry fee! :)
Even figuring in tax, that's over 200 pounds of Twizzlers...

Wow.

MC
 

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CBaron said:
Another question...

I know this is subjective to individual comfort levels but what temp rating bag would be reccomended? Or how about...what is the range of nigh time temps we will be dealing with?

The highest I've camped (summer in CO) has been about 8900ft and it was getting down to lower 40's. How low will (can) it get? I've got a 40* down bag but I'm unsure if I may need a wamer bag, or even a synthetic.
It's unlikely that you'll see colder than 20, but it's possible that it'll get that low on at least one night. If you're already wet and tired going into that night, better hope that you've got clothes/bag/gear to get you through it.

I'm not typically an advocate for carrying everything and the kitchen sink, but having spent a few sleepless nights out over the years, shivering when I coulda been sleeping, I always err on the warm side now. Doesn't mean you need a zero degree bag, but figuring out what you need to stay semi-comfy at 20 degrees will serve you well on this trip.

Don't forget about the flip-side too--what if when you go to set up your bivy it's 60 degrees and buggy?

MC
 
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