Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Underskilled
Joined
·
4,807 Posts
simen said:
My 2-step Lyrik seems quite affected by low temperatures. Reba on my 29er not. It has to be 29er: 26er thing.:)
Are you sure it is the air pressure?

The temp change will affect the oil/rubber bits more.
Not forgetting that the air will heat rapidly when you start riding
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
BadPirate said:
Do you all adjust air pressure +/- as the temp drops?
I will respectfully disagree with most here. Sure it depends on how cold you ride. Given the small chamber size of a fork or shock it will be highly dependant on tempurature fluctuations. On the flip side the oil gets thicker and seals will shrink making it harder to move a suspension part so it partially evens out. Just check your sag when the bike has sat outside for your proper sag measurement.

I also hope that what little I am working my fork or shock will create enough heat to make it warm enough to expand the air inside. Last I checked there was still snow and ice on both after my ride today : )

Rob
 

·
Hybrid Leftys aren't real
Joined
·
16,470 Posts
Dunno, I have a fork that I was out riding at about 10 F, and it softened up significantly. Perhaps I hadn't checked the pressure in a while, but the ride a week before, at a warmer temp, it had been fine, as it had been, un-checked, all Fall. Put my pump on, and it was well below my normal setting. Not saying it's an exact science, but with shrinkage of dissimilar materials etc, I can see it having an effect, but how much is probably a moving target based on the large number of variables....

I'd say just get it to where it feels good again, and keep an eye on it. If it's normal once you re-pressurize, just run with it. Mines been fine since.
 

·
mnt bike laws of physics
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
onlycrimson said:
I would assume the air in our forks still adheres to the rules of air and temperature.
No need to assume. The ideal gas law is so simple most anyone can use it.
Pressure is directly related to absolute temperature, so if your summer riding is about 55 degrees F higher than your winter riding, there will be a 15% drop in air pressure inside the air chamber in the winter. If you didn't add more air to your shock, then it will have more sag in the winter. The argumant that your shock will heat up in the winter is invalid since under the same riding conditions, the air in the shock will always be 55 degrees cooler when it is 55 degrees cooler outside.
With this said, doesn't it make sense that you should check your sag when the shock/fork is up to operating temps?

Altitude has an effect as well on air shocks. The higher you are, the less sag you will have because the relative pressure within the air chamber will increase. This effect is so minimal, it is barely worth mentioning since the difference between sea level and 8000' elevation is about 4psi, so if you have 100psi in your shock it would be like it increased to 104psi if you go from seal level to 8000'. Most would barely notice this small change.

Air and oil have completely different duties within a shock. You cannot compensate one for the other. Air is simply the spring while the oil is for motion control. When it is very cold, an oil shock will feel more harsh, but with more sag if you didn't change a thing since summer. All more sag will do is give you more negative travel and make it ramp up a little less at the end of travel in an air shock.
 

·
never ender
Joined
·
1,314 Posts
In my limited experience, how you store the bike matters a lot to how the suspension performs in cold weather. I lived in the northeast for a year and kept my bike outside even after winter hit. After a few weeks of below-freezing temps, I started having all kinds of stiction-like problems, and eventually the seals failed in the middle of a ride. Not fun. I rebuilt the fork with lighter oil and new seals and started keeping the bike indoors. After that, no more problems. Live and learn.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top