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bonkin' clyde
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831 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was curious as to whether it would be a good idea to have a coil shock in the back since I seem to be really moving through the 3.75" of travel in back despite the 260 psi in the Fox AVA R I have. I was wondering if there was some way to get soemthing a little stiffer...if not another stiffer air shock, then a coil shock. BTW, I weight 210 lbs in full riding gear.
 

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Banned
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7,131 Posts
260psi seems WAY too high, also if you are having "too much movement", you might need to ditch the AVA and get an air shock with a smaller air chamber, that will make it more progressive, which will mean less movement. If you don't want to do that, consider a manitou swinger-air 4-way, with the progressiveness adjustment, that may also be the ticket to make it more progressive.

The NRS will not work well with a coil spring, unless you get a stiff enough coil that does NOT sag when you sit on it, the NRS is designed to be ridden with NO sag because pedaling forces cause the suspension to extend, hence when ridden with sag it bobs horribly. When it is ran without sag like the manual states, the shock can't "extend" and it pedals well, except that the ride is harsher than other FS bikes and it requires more air pressure than other bikes.

The NRS might not be the best bike for you at this point.
 

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Derailleurless
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9,122 Posts
Latching on to Jm.'s comments, you're facing some issues.

I was pushing 240 pounds when I owned my NRS a few years back, and my AD12 shock was pushing it's red line at around 250 psi. This suspension is tough on shocks, because despite its modest suspension compression ratio, the shock doesn't get the benefit of any sag -- meaning it needs at least 33% more air pressure than a typical single pivot or 4-bar bike.

Coil is a bad idea for two reasons. The suspension needs a rising spring rate, which an air chamber provides as the air is compressed. Any properly sprung coil you install on the NRS is going to be worse than what you're experiencing now. In addition, the spring needs to be *perfectly* tailored to your weight, to hold you just on the cusp of sag. Too much spring, you'll be esentially riding a hardtail until a big enough bump force comes along to displace things, and too little and you're suddenly in bob city.

Make sure your AVA chamber is set all the way to the minimum. Failing that, I believe you can retrofit your AVA chamber with a standard Float chamber, which will be somewhere in the neighborhood of two-thirds your AVA's smallest volume, and will provide you with the rising spring rate you're looking for to solve your trouble.

I quickly realized my NRS was not the bike for me -- great for it's hardtail-like racer qualities, but definitely not a compliant trailbike. Re-evaluate your needs. I ended up switching to a dw-link bike and actually felt more efficient on it. And there are a lot of less severe NRS alternatives out there if you can't get this ride dialed.
 
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