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Are coil shocks (even using a progressive frame) more prone to bottoming out since they're linear ? My clash came with the rock shox super deluxe coil, 450 lbs spring, 163 lbs geared up. I would say I bottom out once or twice on most of my local trails. There's only a lsc adjustment and it's about in the middle of the range. The sag is right, about 28%. So is bottoming out bad for the frame ?
 

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So is bottoming out bad for the frame ?

Depends how hard. Sounds like you need to bump up your spring rate. Not uncommon, owning a coil shock, to have to invest in multiple coils.
 

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Regardless of whether it's air or coil, if you're feeling harsh bottom-outs when you don't feel you should, then you should consider upping your spring rate (swap coils or add air pressure) and/or your compression damping (probably HSC but it depends on your setup). For an air shock you could also try adding tokens / volume spacers.
 

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Open up your LSC all the way, and wind off your preload to the bare minimum, and see if the spring feels too light/undersprung. No need for a ride, just a quick bounce down the street.

If its mushy, go up in spring weight. If its sort of firm, the bike might not be well suited for a coil.

Rear shocks are leveraged by the frame, so they sort of end up not actually having spring characteristics. I had a reign with a air shock stuffed full of volume spacers that would bottom out over any tiny drop. Some santa cruz frames are difficult to bottom out even with a coil shock though. If it was a fork, that would be backwards, but the frame linkages change everything.
 
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