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Hi there fellow cyclists! I have decided to take the plunge picking out parts, DIY assembling and repairing my 1st bike and i feel 100% this is what all cyclists ought to do as the knowledge gained is priceless :thumbsup:

Anyway my virgin self assembled steed is what i call a "frankenpack" as i assembled it to be a 24/7 commuter and an occasional bike pack/tour rig ^^ Basically its a alloy HT frame, rigid cromo fork and a mixture of mtb/road parts haha My question here is about cog replacement/repair. Suppose i have a 8 speed cassette 11-40T wide range? My "cruising" cog is the 7th i.e 13T one. Its a 1x8 drive bike :p A few days back i noticed a stiff link in chain and was experiencing bad chain slips and rough shifting all across the cogs so naturally i got a new chain. Once installed the difference was huge as shifting and noise were brilliant but on the 7th cog in particular the chain still slips so upon closer inspection i saw the teeth on that cog crooked! So what i am thinking is

#1 Since cogs #8 and #7 are not bolted to spider i.e free i would simply replace the 13T cog with an idling 13T cog off a 9 speed cassette - would this work?

#2 Take out the crooked 13T 8 speed cog and hammer it flat and see if chain slip issue is resolved?

Which of these 2 options (other than buying a new cassette) would be a wiser choice?
 

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#1 would probably mess up the shifting on everything larger than #7 since 9sp cogs are slightly narrower than 8sp, so everything past it is going to be closer than the shifter wants it to be. It may work since it's only 2 gears but I imagine that the larger gears are going to get progressively worse and grindy if you don't start skipping.

#2 would probably work provided you don't break teeth off and it's bent teeth and not ones overworn by the chain. You may also not need a hammer, just a flat adjustable wrench and a vice with some wood block to hold the main body of the gear. I've seen shops do this with chainrings several times, I think it would work fine on a cassette gear.
 

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The cog teeth are likely crooked by design, most are. A new cassette would be the best repair, especially since you just installed a new chain. You and your bike deserve it..
 
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