Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Birdman aka JMJ
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning on converting my wife's Soma Groove hardtail to SS using a cassette cog & spacers. Anyone have experience with the Gussett kit? I remember there used to be someone selling their own brand of cog & spacer kits through the MTBR classified, I forget who though - anyone remember?

BTW - I'm also planning to use a retired rear derailleur as a tensioner until she decides if she likes it or not before converting to an ENO hub or Soulcraft tensioner.

Thanks - JMJ
 

·
thats Mr.Dirtbag to you
Joined
·
23 Posts
flashpoint

There is a guy on ebay that sells a cog and spacer kit under the brand name flashpoint. I've been running one since I saw the singlespeed light this spring. It's nothing fancy, but it's cheap(approximately $10) and it works fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
kit? don need no stinkin' kit

every worn out freehub cog set that uses individual cogs -- which is every 6 and 7-sp. shitmano cluster in existance, as well as low-end 8 sp. ones -- has perfectly good spacers in between the cogs that are just waiting for you to mine them. Most every LBS has discards in a box under bench. Most any rear wheel on most any bike you find in the trash, dump, garage sale, or gathering dust behind someone's garage has what you need.
Standard ramped cogs seem to work ok, I've been using them without problems. Even better/cooler are old uniglide "twist tooth" cogs, which have no ramps. Harris Cyclery has them, as well as shitmano BMX rampless cassette cogs. ThirdHand, or LooseScrews, same place, forget which name they're going with this year, also stock them, at least they used to before they pared down their inventory.
As for normal "thin" cogs eating thru the splines of a freehub body, yeah, that can happen is you're using a ti or aluminum body. Not with a steel body, which is most of them. If individual "thin" cogs worked ok for 6 and 7-sp. clusters, they'll work just as well with spacers replacing all but one of the cogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I would spend...

I would spend the extra $9 and get the gussett kit. First off it comes with two cogs a 16t and a 18t, and it comes with the lockring. The flashpoint kit has no lockring. I've used both and the gussett kit is much more refined and accuratly "machined" than the flashpoint (cut PVC spacers). I think jenson has the gussett for $19 bucks right now. Worth it.
 

·
Rollin' a fatty
Joined
·
5,863 Posts
I'm purchased a Flashpoint kit when started, it's a series of PVC spacers and a Shimano BMX cog.

Then I started to cut my own spacers with Sch40 PVC tubes and used Novatech cogs (9sp chain compatible).

Now I still use the PVC spacers but use Boone or King cogs, this way I'm trying to prevent damage to the hub spline that can be created by using thin cogs.

FWIW, FastFreddy was the seller on the Novatech cogs, he used to sell a 16,18,20t combo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
bulC said:
every worn out freehub cog set that uses individual cogs -- which is every 6 and 7-sp. shitmano cluster in existance, as well as low-end 8 sp. ones -- has perfectly good spacers in between the cogs that are just waiting for you to mine them. Most every LBS has discards in a box under bench. Most any rear wheel on most any bike you find in the trash, dump, garage sale, or gathering dust behind someone's garage has what you need.
Standard ramped cogs seem to work ok, I've been using them without problems. Even better/cooler are old uniglide "twist tooth" cogs, which have no ramps. Harris Cyclery has them, as well as shitmano BMX rampless cassette cogs. ThirdHand, or LooseScrews, same place, forget which name they're going with this year, also stock them, at least they used to before they pared down their inventory.
As for normal "thin" cogs eating thru the splines of a freehub body, yeah, that can happen is you're using a ti or aluminum body. Not with a steel body, which is most of them. If individual "thin" cogs worked ok for 6 and 7-sp. clusters, they'll work just as well with spacers replacing all but one of the cogs.
i agree with everything except the use of a ramped cog. it works great 99% of the time but that 1% of the time it will fail is when you are really torking on it and it will send your knees pummeling into the handlebars and probably throw you on to the ground as well. shimano DX cog's are cheap and foolproof....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
another advantage with spacers from a cassette.....

you can pin them together with a cog from a cassette to create a sandwich. I have a drive cog, two cut down cogs as steel spacers and 4 plastic spacers pinned together as one unit. I used split pins or roll pins from the local big box hardware place. They look like a hollow tube cut down their length, so they act like a little spring. There is a size that will compress enough to be easily tapped into the 3 holes that originally held your cassette together. The extra steel spacers will spread the load on the cassette to prevent the drive cog cutting into the cassette. If you are worried about a ramped cog dropping your chain you could use two large cogs as chain guides, maybe grind the teeth off for a sano look. To line up the cogs and spacers I just slipped 2 nails through 2 of the 3 holes and tapped them into a board, then put in the first pin, then removed a nail and put in the second pin etc. Personally I have had more trouble with ramped and pinned rings dropping the chain.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top