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enjoys skidding
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Hey all,

I have just invested in a 2004 Kona Coiler, which comes with Shimano PD-M505 clipless pedals..

Up until now I have been 100% hardtail rider, but I have taken the plunge (and now have the funds available :D ) to get a dually.

Now, your suggestions please! ;)

Would you suggest putting some bmx style platforms on it until I learn the whole dually thing, and then go with the clipless pedals, or just try and learn the lot at once?

Also, how hard is it to "un clip" (yea i know theyre "clipless").. like with downhilling and jumping and stuff, if i need to bail, is it easy? or am i gonna get badly hurt? haha

Finally, what shoes would you guys recommend.. I want something that doesnt look like a bike riding shoe, but more like the bush walking style of shoes.. I know Shimano do these but I'm not sure how good they are.. Do any of them actually have the cleat set back into the shoe? I am hoping to get a shoe that I can ride to work in, and then wear all day.

Sorry bout the long post!! (And please dont tell me the Coiler is crap lol.. the mtbr reviews said it is good!! it feels nice to ride.. I guess I will find out for sure soon enough)
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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it is all about preferance....If you like platforms then get them


Platforms you can get away from your bike faster though
 

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Personally, I would not downhill or jump with clipless (if you are freeriding). Some guys do and like it. But you'll find that majority do not. For xc riding clipless is ideal. As long as you adjust the pedal clip-in tightness to your liking, I think you will do ok. Practice clipping in an out in a grassy area, so if you go down at least it would be semi soft.
 

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alexair said:
Personally, I would not downhill or jump with clipless (if you are freeriding). Some guys do and like it. But you'll find that majority do not. For xc riding clipless is ideal. As long as you adjust the pedal clip-in tightness to your liking, I think you will do ok. Practice clipping in an out in a grassy area, so if you go down at least it would be semi soft.
i would ride road/xc clipless and mabye dh, but not freeride (i would bail alot more and would not need the torque b/c i wouldn't be racing)

but go clipless for all i care, tell me how it works out :D
 

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jasevr4 said:
I have just invested in a 2004 Kona Coiler, which comes with Shimano PD-M505 clipless pedals..

Also, how hard is it to "un clip" (yea i know theyre "clipless").. like with downhilling and jumping and stuff, if i need to bail, is it easy? or am i gonna get badly hurt? haha

Finally, what shoes would you guys recommend..
Congrats on your new bike. :)

1, Shimano clips are good because you can tighten or loosen them with the turn of the screws. Loosen them till you are falling out of them, then tighten it a click. This will be good to start.

You can choose single-release or multi-release cleats for the shoes. FWIW, I prefer single-release.

2, Till you are comfortable with the clips, ride on fireroads or the street in front of your house and practice clipping and unclipping. Come to a complete stop over and over again. Eventually you'll trackstand.
If commuting and coming to a traffic light or stop sign, always clip out on both sides. Take if from a recovering roadie, there is nothing more humiliating than coming alongside a car and crashing to the pavement with your foot still attached to the pedal. If this happens and there are cute chicks present, you can roll onto your back and ride the bike upside-down for fun. You meant to do that. ;)

I clip in for DH unless it's really muddy or I think I'll need to dab a lot. I feel safer going airborne knowing that my feet will not come off the pedals, and my clips are really loose so I can unclip without thinking about it. But I am on flats for 4X or when I'm at the BMX track.

3. Shimano has some good looking shoes that are lace-up SPD compatible shoes. My suggestion though, is that you keep a pair of shoes at work and use mtn bike shoes for riding. Mostly for the sweat/comfort factor.

Hope this helps and is not too long-winded. I get to use more words though, 'cause I'm a girl and we do that. ;)
 

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I like bikes
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clipless

Most freeriders use platforms, a lot of pro DH racers use clipless.

If you want to try them, set the tension screw all the way out and practice around town, somewhere where you concentrate on the pedals, not avoiding a tree. When you get more comfortable, you can tighten them down. I would really recommend a pair of clipless platform Shimano's for a downhilling clipless newbie.

After 6 months or more and you are totally comfortable with clipless, try out the Time or Crank Brothers platform pedals. They are not as good for clipless newbies because they don't have adjustable tension, but they are WAY better in the mud and just general performance. I use the Crank Brothers Mallet M pedals on my demo 9. only 400g for platform clipless.

I also use the Specialized Sawpit shoe. Good protection, traction, and a flexible toe for hike a bikes. And named after my favorite trail here in Cali.
 

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enjoys skidding
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks for the replies everyone.. not long winded at all. i am at work at the moment and i need some way to pass the time!

considering i havent stacked it hard for a couple of years now (maybe i'm just not riding hard enough), i think i should be right with the clipless, but i think the best option is to do some very easy slow riding and learn how to clip out before going too hard..
 

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Try sh-55 cleats

I assume you are using the SH-51 single release cleats, if so try the SH-55 multi-release cleats. The beauty of the SH-55 is you can yank out of the pedal when you are bailing, no ankle turn required. They take some getting used to; you have to be smooth or you'll yank out of them too easily. Once you are used to them, you can set the release pretty much as low as you would for the single release.

The pedals you have are OK, but the one to get for this is the 636 / 646 / 647. 636 is all metal and a bit wider than the 646, the 646 is still good and has sealed bearings (I'm told). Neither of these pedals are made anymore, but there are plenty of used ones around in good shape.

The 647 has a high-tech plastic cage to save weight, I'm leery of them but I personally haven't heard any bad reports.

You should learn to ride with platforms, however: clipless can be a crutch that holds you back from developing good bike handling skills
 

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I ride clipless for everything except for dirt jumping. For a while I switched back and forth for DH, but the last couple of seasons I only ride clips for DH unless there is wet snow (not very common at races). Some people say clips are cheating because you can hop your bike easier, and that is true. However, when riding flats you can be sloppier in the corners because it is easier to dab if you make a mistake. So, it goes both ways as far as skills.

As for clips for your bike I'd recommend the Shimano 545. It has an extra platform around the clip area, but is not huge like the 647 DH pedal. I like the 545 on my HD trail bike and the 647 on my DH bike.
 

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enjoys skidding
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
hmm maybe i should give those SH-55 multi-release cleats a shot

i'm gonna pop down to my local and try on some shoes on the weekend

thanks for the suggestions ;)
 
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