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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys and Girls!

I've just taken delivery of my first proper MTB, a Kona Caldera 06. It comes as standard with clipless pedals. Up until now, I've always hired at my local trails - normally either a Giant XTC or a Kona Cynder Cone. At the hire place, they come with ordinary pedals with those little spikes of metal to provide grip and of course pain when you come off!

Anyway, I've been reading the threads on how to use clipless, but the simple question I have is; "Is it worth it?". A few of my mates insist once you go clipless, you'll never go back, but they are all road riders and have few occasions where a quick "dab" is required.

I was thinking of the trails I normally ride (mainly red routes) and I tend to "dab" a fair wee bit. Is it really worth persevering with the clipless or are "normal" pedals just as good?

Basically, I have to either buy new shoes or new pedals! I'm really interested to hear everyones opinions.

Cheers,

Dunks
 

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I think they're worth it, but I've known people who used them for years then went back to platforms--seems like platforms are "in" these days. If you get them, I highly recommend spending half an hour riding around just clipping in and out to get used to them. You'll still probably forget you're clipped in at some point on your first ride and take a tumble, but usually only happens once.

With a little practice you can get out them very quickly, I can do a quick dab no problem. I feel more attached to the bike when I'm clipped in, more in control.
 

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clipless are better in every situation except for difficult freeriding (stunts and stuff), or DH unless you are a serious expert. for "normal" trailriding clipless rocks.
 

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clipless all the way.It makes yo a much stronger riders and faster. I have platforms on my freeride bike only in case i have to bail in a really big hurry or grab the nearest tree and just let the bike go...dont need it hanging on..lol but for all my commuting and trail riding I would never give up the clipless....but really spend some time getting used to them before you take on a trail. Oh and on the DH's I find the I never have to worry about my foot sliding off it I hit a big bump..it is just more stable for the downhills. Have fun Kona.
 

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I had a tough transition to clipless. I didn't know the pedals were adjustable, and they were at the stiffest setting, so I thought it was my own fault I was unable to clip out and kept crashing. We're talking six weeks of two or three crashes per ride and I ride a lot. Finally I did some adjusting and the cleats are worn in, and I have to say my climbing is so much better I feel like a different rider altogether. It takes some getting used to, but do it.
 

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I've switched back to normal flat pedals just because it's easier than having to change shoes (yes, I'm that lazy). But they do have benefits and for regular trail riding and especially climbing their nice.

As for dabbing. Once you get use to them you can clip out without ever thinking about it. After years of riding and crashing I never forgot or had trouble clipping out after the first few rides.

Definitely try them out and if you don't like them you can sell them on ebay and get some nice flats.

Jim
 

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konahottie_311 said:
Oh and on the DH's I find the I never have to worry about my foot sliding off it I hit a big bump..
Um... depends on your definition of DH. Clipless are awesome for most all trail riding, but keep a set of platforms handy if you get into situations where you might need to throw the bike*.

BTW, try on a bunch of shoes before you commit to 'em. I've got some Specialized BG Tahoes, but find something that's comfy for you - you'll be spending many happy hours wearing them!

*ow, my wrist is hurting again from that crash... ;)
 

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I'm a total noob in using the clipless , even after many falls with bruises :D I would not go back to flat as clipless gives me more confident and climbing power. Yes it does take some getting used to ( falling off with the bike still attach to your legs is a part of the deal :) ) and right clipless for the condition of the trails that you ride but once you go clipless you wont look back . Good luck
 

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I just recently got my first set of clipless pedals i will never go back they are great so much more power climbing.I went with the Crank Brothers mallet c pedals they are a platform and a clipless so you get the best of both worlds.And if you get in a sticky situation just clip out and use them as platforms or if you come up on some hills just clip in and enjoy the climbing power.Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all your views folks. Have decided to stick with the clipless for now, they are Shimano PD-M505's btw. Already been out and got myself a pair of Specialized Sport MTB. I'll head out tomorrow to some "soft" areas to try them out, armed with my allan key to adjust as necessary.

Thanks again,

Dunks
 

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No I'm Spartacus said:
Um... depends on your definition of DH. Clipless are awesome for most all trail riding, but keep a set of platforms handy if you get into situations where you might need to throw the bike*.

BTW, try on a bunch of shoes before you commit to 'em. I've got some Specialized BG Tahoes, but find something that's comfy for you - you'll be spending many happy hours wearing them!

*ow, my wrist is hurting again from that crash... ;)
ahhh crashes....still recovering from mine from Aug....but I know what you mean.I just ment the dh's most xc trails I ride aren't so bad that I worry about unclipping in a hurry but when I am riding fernie or whistler the platforms all the way...
 

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dnisbet said:
Thanks for all your views folks. Have decided to stick with the clipless for now, they are Shimano PD-M505's btw. Already been out and got myself a pair of Specialized Sport MTB. I'll head out tomorrow to some "soft" areas to try them out, armed with my allan key to adjust as necessary.

Thanks again,

Dunks
Before your first ride put your bike in a trainer and practice clipping in and out. Or if you don't have a trainer just lean up against a wall to practice the first couple times.

You will get it very quickly but the first few tries are weird so it's better to not try them during regular riding.

Jim
 

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dnisbet said:
Thanks for all your views folks. Have decided to stick with the clipless for now, they are Shimano PD-M505's btw. Already been out and got myself a pair of Specialized Sport MTB. I'll head out tomorrow to some "soft" areas to try them out, armed with my allan key to adjust as necessary.

Thanks again,

Dunks
Another thing to remember is to set them up properly. Clipless pedals can cause knee injuries over time if your feet aren't lined up properly. The Shimanos have very little play, which makes it even more essential to properly set them up.
 

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Go clipless, they are completely worth it. I have a set on every bike I own and they've been that way for six years now. I even raced bmx with them. You will learn, some learn fast and some don't. Eventually you will not even remember that you are clipped in and it will become second nature. Figure out how to adjust the tension, do some easy rides around the block practicing unclipping and then hit your favortie trails.
 

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Go clipless. I didn't like them until I tried some eggbeaters cause I can unclip real easy with those and have more float to move around on. They feel strange at first cause they feel like you're standing on tiny pegs and easy to slip right out, but it's not. Whatever you do just ride them on easy situations an practice getting out quick.
 

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Clip In!!!!!!!

Clipless will always be a great advantage for XC or trail riding. I cannot speak for DH riding. You will climb better and you can pedal in 360's!! Standard pedals have zero advantages over clipless once you advance past the learning curve. Don't go for the spd crap. Go with Time or go with nothing!!!!!!!
 

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Definately Clipless

Hey man, i was recently in your situation. I got a brand new Giant NRS 3. Anyways. I got it on saturday went for a spin didn't fall...unfortunately, the next day our team had our local race. Anyways i fell several times but even with the falls and bending a rim brake under the rim...i did close to 4 minutes better between the new pedals which ruled...Moral of the story is:go clipless
 
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