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Evolutionsverlierer
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Really, most lockouts are meant only for smooth surfaces. Some bikes have "trail" modes that increase compression damping for less movement on the climb, but generally the rougher the climb is, the less you can use this kind of stuff, because you need traction to keep moving forward. Locked out shocks don't give traction.
This, the only time I lock out my fork is on longer gravel road climbs and even there mainly when I get out of the saddle for a bit.
 

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If someone invents something that reminds me to unlock my shocks prior to a downhill I'll be the first one in line to buy it.
 

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If someone invents something that reminds me to unlock my shocks prior to a downhill I'll be the first one in line to buy it.
It just needs to flip the lever from locked to unlocked after the first big hit. Seems pretty doable.
 

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GONE
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I only lock out my fork on smooth terrain climbs, such as road pedaling to the trailhead, or sustained XC ST climbs, or fire road climbs.

For technical climbs, I want some reaction from the suspension to minimized the beating from impacts to my old aching bones and joints.
 

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Never lock the forks. And rarely lock the rear shock. When I do, it's really just out of curiosity to see if it really makes a difference on a long steady climb.... which for, it really doesn't.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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I messed with lock outs periodically years ago and never liked them. Often forgot to unlock. Haven’t messed with them in years. If I rode where long fire road climbs were involved I may lock out the rear.
 

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I have a grip shift type lever to lockout both front and rear, so it's very easy to do. Almost never use it. Seat of the pants experimenting has shown that it's only beneficial on the smoothest of climbs...which we generally don't have in my area. It is kind of fun in those limited situations to stand and climb and put power down like a road bike.
 

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I lock it out in front if I am standing which i do fairly often I put rear in trail for traction. Fire roads asphalt climbs I am fully locked out

tech climbs I am seated and in wide open front and back

I run different ctd front and rear all the time looking for that perfect combo

I fiddle with mine all the time its not that hard do it and can be done on the fly

I think of it like changing gears using my dropper only i do far less frequently
 

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It just needs to flip the lever from locked to unlocked after the first big hit. Seems pretty doable.
Until you get to your 40s and your brain is full of other crap, so you lock it out, forget, then wonder the entire way down what is wrong with your bike. It is much easier to remember when you are twenty and have three thoughts,: sex, booze, lockout.
 

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Not sure if this is the right place but if not point me in the right direction.

I have a section of steep, technical, windy, rocky and rutted single track that I ride frequently. On my old bike, I was just not in great shape and my boat anchor coil sprung sun tour fork was pretty much useless for adjustments so it didnt really matter if I locked it out or I didnt. Now I have a new bike with a Rockshox Judy Silver, and its MUCH better than the previous fork, and when riding this technical section, I am not sure if I should lock the fork out to get more power down or if I should leave it open so it can absorb the ruts and bumps. Ideas? I have tried both ways and neither jumps out to me to be better...I am still getting my endurance up to climb this hellish section of trail, so I will take any bit of help I can get.
full open, all the time, everywhere. I will on occasion use lockouts when I know i have a long road slog, but in general, I don't ever bother with pedaling platforms / lockouts. The efficiency gained over a properly sagged and setup suspension is not worth it to me.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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My current fork doesn't even have a lockout (MRP Ribbon), so no.

Bike before that didn't have lockouts, either (FS bike). 3 mtbs ago, I had lockouts. I played with them briefly, encountered all the things that everybody else has mentioned (mostly didn't like them, only found them a little useful for smooth pavement, forgot to open up my suspension for the downhill, etc) and then didn't touch them for the rest of the 11yrs I owned that bike.
 

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When steep climbing, your front end is light/unweighted, and you won't get any measurable added efficiency by locking out, but the front end might bounce around a bit more, - the shock probably barely moves at all unlocked, and if it does it's because it needs to.
My fs xc race bike has the sram/rockshox dual lockout (one button for front and rear), I wish I could delete it, I never use it, it's just one more thing to bleed and maintain. I probably should practice using it in case I ever have a sprint finish on pavement, but other than that I won't use it. I pretty much always start races seated, and 'bob' is a non issue on the fs or the hardtail.
 

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I bought a lockout and goddamnit I'm gonna use it!

I must say, though....that I'm learning how to better use my lockout:

1) It's cool lifting the front wheel on uphill technical rock gardens and getting immediate response. No advanced planning.
2) It's even cooler on the same techy downhills to not deal with the handlebars doing the deep dive. Again, immediate, predictable and precise response.

Modern bikes are a technological marvel. You should learn to use that technology.
 

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Until you get to your 40s and your brain is full of other crap, so you lock it out, forget, then wonder the entire way down what is wrong with your bike. It is much easier to remember when you are twenty and have three thoughts,: sex, booze, lockout.
What I mean is, the suspension companies should design a fork or shock where if you hit a big enough bump with the shock locked out, the shock flips itself into the unlocked position. It doesn't seem like it would be that technically difficult to implement.
 
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