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Hey all, new member here.

I bought a Trek 4300 last summer and have finally been able to take it out on some more "intense" trail rides. The last couple I went on were very muddy and my rear brake pads got chewed up pretty quick.

What would be some good reccomendations for v-brake pad replacements? I was looking at kool-stop thinline. Other suggestions?

Lastly, what are the most important things to remember maintenance wise after a long muddy ride? Other than rinsing off/greasing chain...

cheers!
 

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usually after riding in mud its just best to let the mud dry then use a stiff brush to get most of the mud off, dont use a stiff brush on the frame though that will scratch the paint. keep mud out of the derailleurs, gears, and brakes. you can hose your bike off but use low pressure and avoid directly spraying the hubs, pedals, or anywhere else where you have bearings. make sure you lube (not grease) your chain with the correct type of lube. use a dry lube for dry conditions and a wet lube for muddy/wet conditions.
 

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I always used red Cool-Stop/Ritchey pads on my older V-brake equiped bike. It had XT Vs with the cartridge pad holders on it so there was no adjusting when swapping out pads. I always felt the red compound offered good dry and wet braking (for a rim brake) and they were sort of squishy which helped brake modulation too.

Now that that bike is my all season commuter (rain, ice, snow) I use a red pad in the back and an olive green "extreme condition" pad in front. The green pads stop even better when wet and also do an ok job when there is ice on my rims/brakes. But I think it's too abrasive to use on a trail bike because of extra wear on the rim. And it makes an annoying scraping sound.

As for mud, keep an eye on your rims. Over time, all the mud etc will get worked into your brake pads, increasing abrasion, and will wear your rim sidewalls away. When you notice your rim walls getting a deep concave shape to them it's time to replace. I've had friends who's rims broke apart on rides because of this.

I don't agree with the "let the mud dry and brush it off" idea. I just think it's way easier to hose off the mud while it's still kind of wet - before it "sets".

If you're going to be riding lots of muddy terrain invest in a crank puller and BB tool. Eventually the grime will work its way into your bottom bracket shell and cause squeaks and creaks. You'll want to pull that stuff apart, clean, regrease, and reinstall. It's easy with the right tools and will save you money in the long run.
 

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thinlines are for the front

seif10mes said:
I was looking at kool-stop thinline. ?
I think the thinlines are designed mainly for use in the front when you have clearance problems removing the front wheel with the normal v-brake pads. If that's not a problem, I would go with the regular sized pads.
I just put a new set of the dual compound pads (black and salmon) on one of my bikes but haven't really used them yet. I've used the black koolstop pads for years though and have been very happy with them.
 
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