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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a chilihead. I love making and eating good chili, both green and red. For me, there is not a better post ride meal than a nice bowl of chili and a cold (or a few) frosty. I like making my own chili powders/sauces and mess around with receipes and what not.

Anybody else addicted to chili?
 

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My mommy has a really good chili recipie. After it is made, it does not usually last too long before it is all gone.
 

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migeorgeco said:
I am a chilihead. I love making and eating good chili, both green and red. For me, there is not a better post ride meal than a nice bowl of chili and a cold (or a few) frosty. I like making my own chili powders/sauces and mess around with receipes and what not.

Anybody else addicted to chili?
Seems like I never make it the same way twice. The basics stay the same but the proportions are whatever seems right at the time.

One thing I do like to be careful with however, the Dave's Ultimate Insanity and the... Two things I like to be careful with however, the Dave's Ultimate Insanity and the home grown and dried habeneros my brother gave me.

Got me going now. Gonna have to mix up a batch this weekend.
 

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I'm not a huge fan of chili, probably 'cause my wife has no idea what she's doing when she makes it. If I made it, nobody else in the house would be able to eat it (that may be a good thing).

I do like to eat peppers, though. One of my favorite meals is to grill up a big fat hamburger, with sliced jalapenos under melted cheddar on top. Another good treat is jalapenos stuffed wtih cheddar, then wrapped with bacon and broiled. Dark chocolate with peppers, Mmmmm.
 

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This year in my garden

I'm growing

Habaneros
Cayennes
Jalapenos
Pablanos
Med Bananas
Mild Bananas
Bells

In past years I also grew the Thai Destroyers, which might be my favorite. I like to grow them, and then dry them, mixed with the other hot varieties (habs, Jals, and Seranos), I'll let them fully dry on the plant, then put them in a coffee grinder (I have one dedicated to spices, so as to not mess up my coffee...) and I make a hot spice blend, which in turn is good on just about everything.

I also love chili, and as an above poster stated so well, the basics often remain the same, but I never duplicate exactly. Try a small amount of unsweet chocolate, and a little bit of old/strong coffee in your chili. I promise it's good. And the blend of many peppers adds layers to the heat, and allows for flavor (as opposed to "just heat").

MMMMmmmmm, you got me all worked up now.:madmax:
 

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bmateo said:
And the blend of many peppers adds layers to the heat, and allows for flavor (as opposed to "just heat").
You obviously know what you're talking about. I made aboiut two gallons of chili yesterday. In it were five varieties of fresh peppers, jalapeno, serano, poblano, long hot ( whatever that is ), and a red bell. Also three varieties of dried peppers, ancho, chipotle, and passila. The dried peppers just go into a blender with a beer to make a slurry. Of course there's freshly ground black pepper and freshly toasted and pulverized cummin seeds to add the the complexity too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bikehigh said:
You obviously know what you're talking about. I made aboiut two gallons of chili yesterday. In it were five varieties of fresh peppers, jalapeno, serano, poblano, long hot ( whatever that is ), and a red bell. Also three varieties of dried peppers, ancho, chipotle, and passila. The dried peppers just go into a blender with a beer to make a slurry. Of course there's freshly ground black pepper and freshly toasted and pulverized cummin seeds to add the the complexity too.
I also make a slurry or basic red sauce consisting of dried New Mexican red, Pasilla and Ancho chilis steeped in hot water and then blended. This is then added to cubed beef, onion, garlic and toasted cumin, corriandor seed and oregano (crushed and blended with a mortis and pestal). This basic receipe is usually elaborated on based on what I feel like or have on hand. Like one of the other posters indicated, layering of chilis and spices makes for a complex well rounded chili. I also look forward to the Hatch chili harvest in the fall. My freezer gets packed with fresh roasted green chilis to last me until the next harvest.
 

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migeorgeco said:
I also make a slurry or basic red sauce consisting of dried New Mexican red, Pasilla and Ancho chilis steeped in hot water and then blended. This is then added to cubed beef, onion, garlic and toasted cumin, corriandor seed and oregano (crushed and blended with a mortis and pestal). This basic receipe is usually elaborated on based on what I feel like or have on hand. Like one of the other posters indicated, layering of chilis and spices makes for a complex well rounded chili. I also look forward to the Hatch chili harvest in the fall. My freezer gets packed with fresh roasted green chilis to last me until the next harvest.
Dammit, I knew I shouldn't have checked back here.

Your red sauce slurry sounds awesome. A few years ago, I made one like that, but I took the dried peppers (Ancho, Jualillo [sp?], and one other) and opened them up and seeded them, then roasted in a dry iron skillet to bring out the flavor. Used Apple Cider Vinegar for the liquid, ground to a slurry with the spices you mentioned, and marinated, then basted on slow-cooked (Mesquite and Hickory) smoked Pork Ribs. To die for I tell ya, to die for.

Biking, Food (and of course my wife and daughter) are my only real passions. Everything else, I just "like". Mexican/Southwestern, Oriental, and Pork in general are at the top of my food list.

[edit] throw in some toasted seeds, a "biscuit", some unsweet chocolate and you damn near have a mole :)
 
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