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If you push laterally on the BB. It will help diagnose if it a suspension pivot. If it is. You can loose one at a time to see which one stopped the noise. The grease and torque all of them.
 

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If you upgrade to an SRAM GX AXS drivetrain, the creaking might go away.
 
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We've all been here before. It's been mentioned but definitely check the rear hub. I had one that was really tuff to nail down and turned out it was internal to the hub. This was a Stan's hub that looked like when I got in there, one of the pawls wasn't fully seated properly. Re-greased everything while I was there, got it all seated nicely and good to go.

Best of luck with it.
 

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Whoops - forgot to include that in the list of what I tried (removed, reigreased, and torqued). Initial post updated.
Pedals have bearings. Most common source of creaking when under load in our shop, especially when load is on one side or the other. ALWAYS the first thing we check.
 

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Murica Man
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Pedals have bearings. Most common source of creaking when under load in our shop, especially when load is on one side or the other. ALWAYS the first thing we check.
mine don't (rf chesters).... is there a way you can swap out bushings for bearings?
 

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mine don't (rf chesters).... is there a way you can swap out bushings for bearings?
Bushings/bearings, either way, they both can make noises like this. We keep a fresh set of pedals (known to not make noise) under the work bench. 80% of the time when we swap these on to the bike, the noise goes away. Also, Chesters have bearing/bushing.

in case you need to rebuild them

Answer to your last question, no.
 

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Pedals have bearings. Most common source of creaking when under load in our shop, especially when load is on one side or the other. ALWAYS the first thing we check.

Weird, the pedal itself is pretty much the very last thing I check when chasing down creaks. Bad pedal bearings can cause issues of course but I seriously can't remember the last creak I've fixed by swapping pedals. A long time ago for sure, and I chase down creaks almost daily. Maybe it's the dry environment I live in.
 

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Weird, the pedal itself is pretty much the very last thing I check when chasing down creaks. Bad pedal bearings can cause issues of course but I seriously can't remember the last creak I've fixed by swapping pedals. A long time ago for sure, and I chase down creaks almost daily. Maybe it's the dry environment I live in.
I guess I always try to troubleshoot starting with the easiest and work my way out from there. 30 years of chasing creaks every day and all.
 

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I guess I always try to troubleshoot starting with the easiest and work my way out from there. 30 years of chasing creaks every day and all.


Same here for sure. I do swap pedals sometimes when I've run out of other ideas but they have rarely been the issue. As mentioned previously I commonly solve creaks by tightening loose pedals though.

I'm not sure what the most common cause I run across is, there's so many. Seatpost is one for sure. Also bb, loose thru-axle, stem, headset, shock mounts, suspension pivots, etc. etc.
 

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And down the rabbit hole you have gone! I just spent the last month chasing a creak myself - when I read your OP I thought it was one I had written seeking advice! I did all of the searching, all the tasks, and got all the same responses.

I took a fast look at the 2014 Transition Bandit you have listed - and here is a weird question - can you 'feel the creak in your feet'?

I did all of the work - every bolt, every component - broke my entire bike down - even replaced the bottom bracket three times - no go. But mine happened mostly when I was IN the saddle and not really on the power.

My bike has a low pivot NEAR the cranks - when I disassembled the entire rear suspension, cleaned, lubed, re-assembled/torqued - the creak was disappeared. But your rear shock looks to be higher.
 

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If everything suggestion in this thread has been vetted, my recommendation is to take it to your LBS. I'm inclined to believe the creaking noise may be caused by internal cable routing.
 

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Lol.
It's your tires.

Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk
 
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You could just get a new bike. 😉
 

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HA - the knees are getting there, but if they made that kind of noise, I may have to consider a different activity.
That sounds almost like a "You know your getting old if. . ." your knees creek and your bike doesn't. In my case, I would suspect my knees first. I hope you find a solution though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
You could just get a new bike. 😉
Not a chance in this bike buying “climate”! Plus, I really like this bike.

I decided while I’m unable to ride for another month or two to tear the bike down and replace the pivot bearings, clean her up, regrease everything again and see if that helps. No seized bearings, but a few gritty ones. Pivots all seem good, but I’ll check for play upon re-assembly.

while checking the hub/cassette for creaks with a chain whip I bent a tooth on the 13t cog - grrrr! Anyone know if I can stick an xt 10-sp 13t cog in a sunrace cassette? The cassette is fairly new, so I’d hate to replace the whole thing just for one cog.
 
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