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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometime in the not too distant future I'm going to change the bar height on my Trance X3 to see what difference it makes to climbing.

It has a tendency to wheelie fairly easily at inconvenient times .... like stepping over roots, rocks, etc..... sometimes even on smoother but steep dirt hills.

It has 3 spacers under the bar totalling about 18-20mm at present.

If I start by removing 1 x 5mm spacer (spacers are 2 @ 5mm & 1 @ 10mm) at a time and progress from there will it help the front wheel stay on the ground on rocky ascents.

If it does make a difference on the uphills what will it do on downhills?
I've gone close to head over heels on some downhill steps at times. Will it be much worse with the bar lower?
 

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If you are nearly

going over the bars on descents now, a lowed bar will ensure you will go over.

Lower your seat for descents, that should fix this issue.

Experiment to get the right height for the bars, or get your LBS involved for fit help and maybe a new/better rise/length of stem. Only you will know when you get it right. I still remember years back another experienced rider helping me rotate the riser bars forward just a tiny bit, and the big improvement it made. Keep experimenting, Jim
 

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Before changing the hand position

make sure of your seat position. Next, you may be forgoing certain riding techniques concerning changing your position on the saddle as you ride and weight to the hands. Keep this in mind before you go and spend money and make changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
JimC. said:
going over the bars on descents now, a lowed bar will ensure you will go over.

Lower your seat for descents, that should fix this issue.

Experiment to get the right height for the bars, or get your LBS involved for fit help and maybe a new/better rise/length of stem. Only you will know when you get it right. I still remember years back another experienced rider helping me rotate the riser bars forward just a tiny bit, and the big improvement it made. Keep experimenting, Jim
My LBS has been involved for a fit-up; it's part of the reason that I'm now requiring changes to be made.... Thanks in part to their help I'm riding better and quicker and now need to alter some things to fine tune the handling.

What did rotating the bars do to the handling of your bike?

PHP:
 make sure of your seat position. Next, you may be forgoing certain riding techniques concerning changing your position on the saddle as you ride and weight to the hands. Keep this in mind before you go and spend money and make changes.
Do you mean I may e.g. shift my weight forward because the bar is lower (or something similar) and then think something else is the cause?
 

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First off...

make no permanent alterations until you are sure of what you want to do. Move spacers around rather than cutting the steerer tube until you are absolutely sure. It's a simple task to pull the stem and move a spacer from under it to over it and reassemble. And it lets you try the new position for a while. Also get some smaller spacers to replace the two 5mm spacers. A stack of 4 2.5mm spacers in place of the 5s will let you try different heights in small increments. Another thing to try, if you can without cost, is a slightly longer stem, or a stem with less rise. Often times extending your hand position further forward without lowering it can help considerably while minimizing negative effects. As little as a 10mm difference in bar length or a 5 degree difference in rise can make a big difference.

But before you start down this road I would suggest that you take a close look at your ridinging technique. Make sure that for steep climbs that you are scooching as far forward as possible on the saddle and weighting the front end by leaning toward the bar to keep the front down. On steep decents get your butt back behind the saddle to shift weight to the rear and unweight the front end. If you've got this down pat, and still have the problems then fiddling with hand position could help.

Just keep in mind that moving your hand position down or forward will move your weight forward on the bike. This will make it tougher to descend and require you to get back further behind the saddle.

To me it sounds like you're pretty much already in the middle of the bike from your description. Sometimes the front end gets light on ascents, and sometimes you feel like you're gonna do an OTB on the descents. Pretty much normal for just about any bike. I'd try a little more body english to start with and go from there.

Good Dirt
 

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rotating bars...

What did rotating the bars do to the handling of your bike?

I loosened the stem bolts and "rolled/rotated" the bar a bit forward, so a clockwise (when seated) "rotation" of the bar just a bit. This slight change of only a few mm or so seemed to give me more control and raised the bar height ever so slightly too. I'm not suggesting this will work for you; my point is that some very small changes I've made have resulted in a better fit and better riding technique.

Good luck, Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good info there fellas.

I'll hang off for the next ride or two with bar height changes.

Body English sounds good to me.... I think I've got a little lazier with that a few months ago. I don't know why. I' ve noticed it more now that I'm riding the duallie and have done something about it.

My bars can be rotated and will give the same gains also (i.e. higher, further forward); I'll look at it as well.

When the rain disappears and I ride the hills again (2 days I hope) I'll pay more attention now that I know what to look for.

Cheers
 

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JimC. said:
What did rotating the bars do to the handling of your bike?

I loosened the stem bolts and "rolled/rotated" the bar a bit forward, so a clockwise (when seated) "rotation" of the bar just a bit. This slight change of only a few mm or so seemed to give me more control and raised the bar height ever so slightly too. I'm not suggesting this will work for you; my point is that some very small changes I've made have resulted in a better fit and better riding technique.

Good luck, Jim
+1 this is good, moving your weight forward. Just make sure that it doesn't "upset" your wrist/hand:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Since I last wrote on this subject I've changed to clipless pedals and didn't alter the bike for the last 3 weeks so I could get used to the change.

Yesterday I dropped the stem height 10mm and rode the same steep climbs and downhills I've been doing for the last 3 wks.

In short.... the bike isn't as twitchy while climbing.
Before the steering was everywhere. I usually got to where I wanted but covered twice the distance to do it.

Now it's still a little flighty but much, much better to climb with.

Shortly I'll try removing the remaining 10mm spacer as well.

For the downhills yesterday I dropped the seat.....I haven't done it before on this bike.

I didn't need to get behind the saddle so much as it's mostly got my weight low enough. That is only 1 ride though; more to come yet.

I had the best ride yesterday I've ever had and actually cleaned a 2.0 km technical rocky climb I've not even come close to getting before.

The steering just made it that bit easier to control through the hard stuff.
 
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