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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
right im looking into buying a new chain as my old one has had it, i am slowly learning how everything works i havent had my bike long so i aint got a clue really, i am guessing that as my bike has 9 cassettes on the back wheel its a 9 speed chain that im after, so im looking at Shimano HG93 9 Speed Chain just wondering if im thinking along the right lines it cant be too difficult, my crankset is shimano slx can anyone reccommend a chain.

also am i right in thinking the chain wont be the right size to start out and ill have to cut it down to the size of my old one, would it be useful to buy one of those special link things which lets you attach/detach it fast?

thanks for any help i really aint got a clue so try to put up with me
 

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Wrath UK said:
right im looking into buying a new chain as my old one has had it, i am slowly learning how everything works i havent had my bike long so i aint got a clue really, i am guessing that as my bike has 9 cassettes on the back wheel its a 9 speed chain that im after, so im looking at Shimano HG93 9 Speed Chain just wondering if im thinking along the right lines it cant be too difficult, my crankset is shimano slx can anyone reccommend a chain.
Nitpicking here, but the whole set of cogs in the back is the "cassette". If you have 9 cogs, yep it's 9 speed.

Chain Recommendation: SRAM PC-971. Not too expensive, not super heavy, has the SRAM power link, which makes removing the chain much easier and nicer.

Wrath UK said:
also am i right in thinking the chain wont be the right size to start out and ill have to cut it down to the size of my old one, would it be useful to buy one of those special link things which lets you attach/detach it fast?

thanks for any help i really aint got a clue so try to put up with me
Most likely you will need to shorten the chain. The way to properly size your chain is to COUNT the number of links on your current chain, then size the new chain to the same amount of links. Don't use length, as chain stretch on the other chain could cause you to size the chain too long.

Chain Breaker: I use the Park Tool CT-5 http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=5&item=CT-5

I don't remember how much money it was, but it wasn't very expensive. It's been great. My only complaint is that for a chain tool I would use ONLY at home, I should have gotten a bigger one. Originally I bought this to keep in my camelbak, but I got another tool later and this one works so well I never bought one dedicated for home ;)

edit: Here's another method for sizing your chain http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain. The way I do it is the way I described, but that method assumes your chain is sized correctly in the first place. It probably is, but I thought I'd include this too just to be safe.
 

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I have two additional comments. One, if you have a full suspension bike, you will also need to make accommodations for "chain growth" as your size the chain, the park tool website has some info:

http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=26

but basically you need to make sure the rear suspension is fully compressed when you size the chain. If you have any doubts check with the bike manufacturer's website or ask your LBS (if available).

My other comment is more of a question. You said the bike is pretty new, no? I wonder if the chain is really the problem. Do you have an LBS to pick their brains, or can you tell us more about what the problems you are having are?

David B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ok cheers i think id be better off taking the bike to the bike shop and gettin and chain and getting it fitted there and then, atleast that way ill know its fitted correctly and i wont have to buy the tool, i will get that chain instead so i can remove it easily to clean it myself
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
davidbeinct said:
I have two additional comments. One, if you have a full suspension bike, you will also need to make accommodations for "chain growth" as your size the chain, the park tool website has some info:

http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=26

but basically you need to make sure the rear suspension is fully compressed when you size the chain. If you have any doubts check with the bike manufacturer's website or ask your LBS (if available).

My other comment is more of a question. You said the bike is pretty new, no? I wonder if the chain is really the problem. Do you have an LBS to pick their brains, or can you tell us more about what the problems you are having are?

David B.
the bike itself is a hardtail trek 6700 2007, the bike i bought used for £200 and the chain was slightly rusted and i thought i might aswell get a new chain to go with my new crankset
 

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I would get a chainbreaker anyway, to carry with you on the trail. You need to be able to affect a trailside repair of a broken chain in order to at the very least ride back to the trailhead.

I carry a multitool with a chainbreaker on it, not as nice to use as my park tool chainbreaker but it gets the job done in an emergency, and a spare SRAM powerlink.

David B.
 

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highdelll said:
yeah but, that much??! :eek:
It bit me on my single speed. Probably not as big a deal on a geared bike, but on the SS you gotta have the super tight chain line and keep the slack down, baby!
 

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nachomc said:
It bit me on my single speed. Probably not as big a deal on a geared bike, but on the SS you gotta have the super tight chain line and keep the slack down, baby!
i concur.....nothing more fun than hurling your giblets into your stem at the immediate stop-spaz-spin of throwing a chain.....

then falling slowly to the ground whelping inaudibly in front of your friends.....unable to unclip....the joy...oh the joy....
 

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Something people often overlook (even shops) is that if you're replacing an excessively worn chain the new chain may not mesh properly with the worn pieces.

The short version explanation is when the links stretch over time they start to carve out some metal on the chainrings and cassette. The new chain will not have as much tooth to hold on to and the crank may slip forward as you pedal.

It's something you should be aware of, get the shop to check the stretch before you change everything.
 
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