Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a super noob question, but I want to make sure I'm getting the right thing.

I bought a 94 Stumpjumper off CL last night, 3x7 setup. I rode it for about 2 miles and then the chain snapped.

Any 7 speed compatible chain should work on this, right? I can get a KMC 7 speed chain on Amazon for $10 and I'm fairly certain it will work, but want to check to see if I'm an idiot.

Amazon.com: KMC Z51 Bicycle Chain (6 & 7 Speed , 1/2 x 3/32-Inch): Sports & Outdoors
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48,238 Posts
This is a super noob question, but I want to make sure I'm getting the right thing.

I bought a 94 Stumpjumper off CL last night, 3x7 setup. I rode it for about 2 miles and then the chain snapped.

Any 7 speed compatible chain should work on this, right? I can get a KMC 7 speed chain on Amazon for $10 and I'm fairly certain it will work, but want to check to see if I'm an idiot.

Amazon.com: KMC Z51 Bicycle Chain (6 & 7 Speed , 1/2 x 3/32-Inch): Sports & Outdoors
My LBS sells the same chain for less.

You need a chain tool to install it and size it properly.

Your LBS can fix it for about what you would pay for chain, tool, and shipping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool, I'll likely check my LBS first to see if they have something in stock.

If not we have a bike co-op right down the street who will let you use their tools and give you a hand with repairs if needed, but I'd have to bring my own chain, hence the question. I think I have a gift card for the LBS so I'm hoping they have one for me.
 

·
Trailhead Poseur
Joined
·
506 Posts
Your LBS can fix it for about what you would pay for chain, tool, and shipping.
That may be, but if the OP were mechanically inclined I would suggest springing for the chain and tool and doing it yourself. It's a fairly simple job, and you'll come out ahead the next time you need to swap a chain since you'll already have the tool and you won't have to make a trip to the LBS and back. Plus, if you break your chain on a trail, you'll know what to do and be capable of addressing it on the spot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'll make the purchase at my LBS if I can, I have a pretty good relationship with the guys there so when I need something fixed they will usually show me how to do it. I'm fortunate to have 2 bike shops and a bike co-op within 2 miles of my house and they're all pretty helpful.

If I snap my chain on the trail I'm probably walking it out, outside of fixing flats I don't have a ton of fixing know how with bikes. I should probably work on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,519 Posts
If I snap my chain on the trail I'm probably walking it out, outside of fixing flats I don't have a ton of fixing know how with bikes. I should probably work on that.
After flats, the most common trail fix required usually involves the chain in some way. Definitely worthwhile having the tool, know-how, and some spare quick links and/or pins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Everyone should know how to work on their chain imho. Often breaks or snaps on the trail, knowing how to fix could save you a 10mile or more walk with a simple fix.

You should get a good multiool, I like my favorite is: Topeak Hexus II Multi-tool


I'd buy that kmc amazon chain with the tool and learn to replace it myself.

Spend the 2hours (genrous) time to learn it now, or spend the hours dealing with a chainbreak later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,171 Posts
the question you must also answer is: why did the chain break? if the drivetrain has already seen a lot of miles, the cassette and chainrings may be worn out and in need of replacement too. a new chain will not play nice with a worn out cassette and rings. if one of the chainrings has a bent tooth, that can damage a chain too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
the question you must also answer is: why did the chain break? if the drivetrain has already seen a lot of miles, the cassette and chainrings may be worn out and in need of replacement too. a new chain will not play nice with a worn out cassette and rings. if one of the chainrings has a bent tooth, that can damage a chain too.

Winner Winner Winner Chicken Dinner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,854 Posts
Everyone should know how to work on their chain imho. Often breaks or snaps on the trail
Knowing how to work on your bike is never a bad thing but if your chain "often breaks or snaps on the trail" you're doing it wrong, because that should happen seldom if ever. I've been riding mountain bikes on and off for 30 years and have yet to break a chain.


the question you must also answer is: why did the chain break? if the drivetrain has already seen a lot of miles, the cassette and chainrings may be worn out and in need of replacement too. a new chain will not play nice with a worn out cassette and rings. if one of the chainrings has a bent tooth, that can damage a chain too.

^^This is an important point IMO. Whenever you install a new chain you should check the condition of the old one. If it is worn beyond a certain point you can be pretty much guaranteed you'll have to replace other parts as well. Usually anything much beyond +1/16 (chain stretch) over 12 inches spells trouble.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top