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What does it smell like?
 

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Old man on a bike
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At first I thought it was a joke product, but after reading the stuff on their website it sounds very interesting. I'm just about to re stock my lube, just might try this stuff...and the one California shop is relatively close! How much is the typical retail cost?
 

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Bikinfoolferlife said:
At first I thought it was a joke product, but after reading the stuff on their website it sounds very interesting. I'm just about to re stock my lube, just might try this stuff...and the one California shop is relatively close! How much is the typical retail cost?
They have an interesting sales pitch but chains do not have bearings. It could also be argued that the load bearing (different meaning) surfaces of a chain are much larger than those of the BB bearings, not the other way around.
 

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shiggy said:
They have an interesting sales pitch but chains do not have bearings. It could also be argued that the load bearing (different meaning) surfaces of a chain are much larger than those of the BB bearings, not the other way around.
So they don't have any magic formula for a lubricant that works better on the load bearing surfaces in a roller chain? Edjucamate us, Don.
 

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Bikinfoolferlife said:
So they don't have any magic formula for a lubricant that works better on the load bearing surfaces in a roller chain? Edjucamate us, Don.
I do not know if they do or not. Just that if they think a roller chain has "bearings" what else does that say about their claims and research processes.

Chain-L does mention extreme pressure (EP) lubes but do not explain why it helps.

I have seen other lube companies talk about EP chain oil performance as related to high pressure spot loads and lube shear resistance. The key being the lube does not get completely squeezed from between the surfaces to reduce wear from metal to metal contact. Chain-L claims their lube flows back in again after it has been pushed out, not that it stays where - and when - it does the most good.
 

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I have to agree with Shiggy, sounds like a bunch of crap. Theres a study out that measured the friction & drag of a bicycling chain ( in a lab) with various types of lube and with no lube, guess what ? no difference, no extra friction, no extra heat, no drag, the conclusion reached was the main benefit of lubes was to fill the voids inside the chain so that water & dirt didn't get in . A major cause of chain wear isn't metal on metal its dirt, and dirt mixed with oil makes a fine abrasive. Read their instructions, they recommend soaking you chain for 10 mins. then lightly wipe off but leave a film, of their own words" sticky oil that will attract dirt", they go on to state that the dirt will eventually soak up the excess oil and flake off, and that even though their oil is solvent based its better for the environment than other oils and will get eaten up by enzymes in the soil and since you don't have to apply it as often. So, if you don't apply it as often I guess that means you don't clean your chain as often? so what happens to the dirt that mixes with the sticky oil and gets into the chain? grind, grind, grind
 

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It's always interesting when folks who've never seen a product feel free to pan it.

Truth in advertizing - I'm the maker of chain-L- so feel free to take my comments with a grain of salt, but I'd like to correct some factual errors, and in the interest of fairness in future posts make an offer to the folks who read this.

First two corrections -
1-to the comment that chains don't have bearings, I suggest searching "plain bearing" in wikipedia or any other reference, then looking at the flexible the pin and link structure of a chain.
2- I'd be interested in seeing the study of chain friction, but need to clarify that we don't lubricate chains to reduce power loss, which is negligible in any case, but rather to prevent chain wear. (As to the conclusions, they might vary depending on the load during the test, and the viscosity of the lubricant. At low loads the power loss to to viscous drag of a heavy oil might exceed the frictional drag. But at higher loads the friction is proportionately higher while the viscous drag remains constant, so at higher loads the effects of lubrication would become more significant.)

I'm not interested in starting a flame war and don't expect to sell Chain-L through hype, nor do I wish to convert folks who've already decide what they like, but I do wish to point out that chain-L gets generally good reviews from folks who've actually used it.

The offer, believing that the proof of the pudding is in the eating, I'm offering to mail a free sample of chain-L #5 to the first 50 open minded readers, with the only condition being that they promise to try it and email me their honest opinions about it.

visit the chain-L.com site and leave me an email if interested. francis
 

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FBinNY said:
It's always interesting when folks who've never seen a product feel free to pan it.

Truth in advertizing - I'm the maker of chain-L- so feel free to take my comments with a grain of salt, but I'd like to correct some factual errors, and in the interest of fairness in future posts make an offer to the folks who read this.

First two corrections -
1-to the comment that chains don't have bearings, I suggest searching "plain bearing" in wikipedia or any other reference, then looking at the flexible the pin and link structure of a chain.
2- I'd be interested in seeing the study of chain friction, but need to clarify that we don't lubricate chains to reduce power loss, which is negligible in any case, but rather to prevent chain wear. (As to the conclusions, they might vary depending on the load during the test, and the viscosity of the lubricant. At low loads the power loss to to viscous drag of a heavy oil might exceed the frictional drag. But at higher loads the friction is proportionately higher while the viscous drag remains constant, so at higher loads the effects of lubrication would become more significant.)

I'm not interested in starting a flame war and don't expect to sell Chain-L through hype, nor do I wish to convert folks who've already decide what they like, but I do wish to point out that chain-L gets generally good reviews from folks who've actually used it.

The offer, believing that the proof of the pudding is in the eating, I'm offering to mail a free sample of chain-L #5 to the first 50 open minded readers, with the only condition being that they promise to try it and email me their honest opinions about it.

visit the chain-L.com site and leave me an email if interested. francis
First, thanks for posting and i wish you well.

Second, the reference to chains having bearings was in comparing them to BB bearings. It is an apples to oranges comparison. Plain bearings (AKA bushings) are very different and have different pros and cons vs the ball bearings in BBs. The lubrication needs are also not directly comparable.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
FBinNY said:
It's always interesting when folks who've never seen a product feel free to pan it.

Truth in advertizing - I'm the maker of chain-L- so feel free to take my comments with a grain of salt, but I'd like to correct some factual errors, and in the interest of fairness in future posts make an offer to the folks who read this.

First two corrections -
1-to the comment that chains don't have bearings, I suggest searching "plain bearing" in wikipedia or any other reference, then looking at the flexible the pin and link structure of a chain.
2- I'd be interested in seeing the study of chain friction, but need to clarify that we don't lubricate chains to reduce power loss, which is negligible in any case, but rather to prevent chain wear. (As to the conclusions, they might vary depending on the load during the test, and the viscosity of the lubricant. At low loads the power loss to to viscous drag of a heavy oil might exceed the frictional drag. But at higher loads the friction is proportionately higher while the viscous drag remains constant, so at higher loads the effects of lubrication would become more significant.)

I'm not interested in starting a flame war and don't expect to sell Chain-L through hype, nor do I wish to convert folks who've already decide what they like, but I do wish to point out that chain-L gets generally good reviews from folks who've actually used it.

The offer, believing that the proof of the pudding is in the eating, I'm offering to mail a free sample of chain-L #5 to the first 50 open minded readers, with the only condition being that they promise to try it and email me their honest opinions about it.

visit the chain-L.com site and leave me an email if interested. francis
Just want to say that i just received my bottle of chain-l this week and it seam to be good ... a bit heavy so it will stay in the chain ... i try my bike yesterday on 60 miles run and everything work fine ... give the sample bottle to my father (they run 75 miles everyday) so he gonna tell me more in couple of weeks ... :thumbsup:
 

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Amused by the name

I give them credit for marketing. I would have never come up with connecting a globally known parfume to lube, but it's amusing. Maybe it has a nice fragrance to it. Worth trying since they have a sense of humor. I've bought so many different lubes, one more won't break the bank. In the end I'll probably go back to my home brew lube.

 

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This seems like the perfect lubricant for my commuting in the cold Syracuse (lots of wet salty snowy icy roads) winter. I usually use a wax lubricant like Squirt but it reacts badly to salt. Ill pick up a bottle and report how it fairs in a few months.
 

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Old man on a bike
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Got my free sample from Francis in today's mail...will take a while for a test report, though.
 

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Absolutely right. The amount of power loss in chain drives is very low under any circumstance.

This study is almost 10 years old and may also suffer from flawed methodology, though without seeing the entire report it's impossible to tell.

One thing that bothers me is their conclusion that chainwheel size is significant. The press report presents this as if it were a surprise, and if so I'm extremely disappointed. Chain drives are 100years old and highly researched. Any manual on their design or use would clearly state that larger sprockets are desirable for greater efficiency. If these folks weren't aware of this going in, it indicates sloppy preparation for their study and might imply other errors as well.

Regardless of this study, real world experience with bicycles demonstrates tremendous variation in chain life, with lubrication definitely being a factor, along with terain, speed, chain width and gear selection among others.

I managed a customer service center for one of the major component makers for a number of years and can tell you that when 10s came out chain life complaints went through the roof. and two predictors of short life were lubrication (both type and follow through or maintainance) and terrain. Rarely did folks in the plains states have issues, with highest number of complaints coming from those riding in the rolling terain of the northeast.

BTW- there are still openings in my offer of free test samples of Chain-L #5, if anyone's interested.
 
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