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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
O.k., so since I've been commuting in the last 9 months or so, I've really been looking for alternatives for safety, and I've tried out mirrors on the helmet(got annoyed by them), and the current ones that fold out on my barends, which are cool but would like a different alternative.

Well, I found this new technology and wanted to see your opinions. I see the advantages and disadvantages(or really what may not work), but wanted to see what you all have to comment. (I have rear-view cameras on at all times on both our cars)

http://www.cerevellum.com/

So during the day, I can't see it being nothing but perfect. It's at night is what I'm curious to see, since I do 70% of my riding after dark. For the price you pay, it better be just as effective in the evening as it is during the day. I have a Superflash in the rear, and I wonder with it on and pulsating, how the camera will react. Also, will the screen be backlit to be able to see what's actually behind you? Will the pulsating flashes also pulsate in the monitor? When a vehicle approaches, will it be washed out when a vehicle approaches to where you can't tell, if they're in a lane on either side of you, or even worse right behind you?

For example, in the camera in our cars, whenever your own blinker, or a vehicle behind who's blinker is on, the display almost seems to toggle bright to dim(reacting to the flashes of light). When a vehicle is directly behind me, the screen is nothing but a washout, until the vehicle is passing, but effective in it's illuminiscence when completely dark.

On top of it all, will it be weather resistant, because I ride rain or shine.

What do you guys think since they've been talking about this coming out for years? Would you pay for it for your safety if and when it eventually comes out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually all I would think I'd see is white. (That's what I see on our cameras in the cars.)

Commuting-wise, there's a 4-mile bike lane from work to the start of my neighborhood. A good 100 yards of it being a busy underpass section for an interstate. The speed limit is 45mph(which in Florida means 60mph to these non-driving buffoons and lost tourists in rental cars). Well, the entire bike lane has a designated turning lane to the right, and I swear I might as well be in the middle of traffic being sandwiched many times during traffic hours. I've been to Philly and New York City, and I'd feel safer up there since bike commuting is accepted, where down here, I'm the only one using the bike lane. I also failed to mention that there is a ghost bike along the way, so you know how congested it can get. Last week, a UPS driver changed lanes right behind me, drove to my right, then must have realized he didn't need to turn quite yet, and almost took me out changing back to the left lane. Yeah he used blinkers, but the 3-foot rule ain't much when the speed limit is 45mph.

I mean, I have pretty good confidence and lots of nerves, and I know even with a camera device, it won't mean people will drive better. Being able to anticipate and avoiding an accident is worth $300 to me if I can help it. I was more curious to know your opinions on it's effectivity.
 

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That's a hard situation that you are in. Would you be able to react quick enough, given the speed of traffic, even if you saw an issue on the screen? Having been a heavy equipment operator and a city plower in my past, I know that using the screens can be troublesome. Often there is a delay in your judgment because your brain is trying to process what you are looking at since you aren't looking in the direction of what is going on. That isn't to say that it is always like that. One eventually adapts to the process.

I would invest in lights and safety vests for greater visibility. They even have air horns for bikes now. Dodging an idiot motorist could cause greater problems at speed since you may end up in an area where other drivers aren't expecting you to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
dubthang said:
Often there is a delay in your judgment because your brain is trying to process what you are looking at since you aren't looking in the direction of what is going on. That isn't to say that it is always like that. One eventually adapts to the process.

I would invest in lights and safety vests for greater visibility. They even have air horns for bikes now. Dodging an idiot motorist could cause greater problems at speed since you may end up in an area where other drivers aren't expecting you to be.
You are correct in the "opposite view" that the camera would produce on the screen as it was very tricky for both my girlriend and I on both our cars to get used to. It took me about a week or so to adjust, and she just has hers on when in Reverse, but yes something to consider if anyone is looking to buy this product. We've had our setup in the cars for at least 4 years now, so it's natural looking at a screen at something behind us.

I do have an SSC P-7D torchlight at high mode at all times, a Superflash in the rear, reflective tape all over my bike and helmet, wear bright clothing as much as possible, and have reflective strips on my Camelbak for safety reasons.

I'm glad you brought up the reverse view of the camera because it is something that most people wouldn't consider. Thanks for the feedback!
 

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Just received my Cerevellum Hindsight 35......

Rode last night around my home.
Most of the roads around here are not well lit (basically pitch dark in some areas), so I had to put an extra taillight (Dinotte) to brighten up more in the back. Going through roads well lit, the Hindsight taillight is more than adequate, as tested.
I can see car headlights way before I can hear them, which allowed me to make adjustments in advance, i.e. moving off the road a bit, etc. The image resolution quality is pretty good; it's not Samsung Galaxy quality, but good enough for video.

As you can tell from the pics, the Hindsight is pretty big, in comparison w/ the Garmin; about the size of a iPhone.
Wonder if they can make it smaller by putting the buttons on the side.

The only minor issue: The camera/taillight attachment holder to your post has a small screw. I tightened it, but it still can easily pivot by hand. I didn't have any issues riding on flat roads. However, I can see myself going over big bump or pothole, and the camera maybe moving. Not sure yet, but I'm going to test it next.

Overall, I really like this product. At $300, I think this is a great value. You can get other data besides the back image (which can be recorded 5 minute cycles), as mentioned in their website, speed, cadence, ANT compatible, HR, etc. Setting this up on your bike took minutes.
 

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New York Times article why cyclists now ride w/ cameras....

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/21/technology/bicyclists-using-cameras-to-capture-accidents.html?hp

"WASHINGTON - When Evan Wilder went flying onto the pavement during his bicycle commute one morning here, he didn't have time to notice the license plate of the pickup truck that had sideswiped him after its driver hurled a curse at him. Nor did a witness driving another car.

But the video camera Mr. Wilder had strapped to his head caught the whole episode. After watching a recording of the incident later, Mr. Wilder gave the license plate number to the police and a suspect was eventually charged with leaving the scene of an accident.

"Without the video, we wouldn't know who did it," said Mr. Wilder, 33, who was bruised and scraped in the crash."
 
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