Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a set of Mavic Crossmax SL ceramic wheels as well as a set of Rolf Propel Ceramic wheels. I love both sets but would like to build a custom set around Chris King hubs. Problem is I can't seem to find an aftermarket tubeless ceramic rim that is not already part of a complete wheelset. Any suggestions?
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,395 Posts
I'm pretty sure Mavic offers the XC717 and XM719 rims in ceramic, check their site.
 

·
www.derbyrims.com
Joined
·
6,766 Posts
mtb_biker said:
ceramic rims = you can stop.

All kidding aside if i had to have rim brakes again it would only be on ceramic rims. They offer alot better braking in all conditions.
Actually ceramic rims brake worse than aluminum after they break in and polish smooth after a year or so, especially when wet (no brakes!). They do brake a little better while near new.

But they do lengthen rim life if they don't chip in less time.

They are better suited for road use.

Disc brakes are far better.

- ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,382 Posts
Thanks, I was just curious, had never heard of ceramic rims for MTB use.
 

·
-> SickLines.com <-
Joined
·
3,196 Posts
derby said:
Actually ceramic rims brake worse than aluminum after they break in and polish smooth after a year or so, especially when wet (no brakes!). They do brake a little better while near new.

But they do lengthen rim life if they don't chip in less time.

They are better suited for road use.

Disc brakes are far better.

- ray
Not sure what ceramic rims you were using but I never had those problems with mine ever. They work excellent in XC condtions. They make blocks to clean the ceramic surface. In my expereince with racing, ceramic brakes are a big advantage f you're not running discs. I"m not really sure how long you used ceramic brakes but they work as advertised with proper maintanace.

I use discs so no need to try and re-hash up a Disc vs. Vbrake battle. I've used them both and i was just answering his question. If ceramic v-brakes were so "inferior" then you'd think crossmax's wouldn't be ceramic as well as alot of other top wheelsets.
 

·
A Real Winner.
Joined
·
863 Posts
Ceramic was cool in the mid 90's. After that, new braking surfaces were developed that give you just as good if not better stopping power than ceramic. Personally, I would avoid getting ceramic rims if you could as it is becoming harder and harder to get ceramic brake pads. Seriously, try to find ceramic pads for canti's. I know Kool Stop makes them, but show me a store that actually has a pair to sell! With ABT or machined sidewalls+newer braking compounds (Kool Stop Tectonic) there is really no need for ceramic at all. And yes, I have owned a ceramic rim where the ceramic started to chip off.
 

·
Goathead Gladiator
Joined
·
280 Posts
I prefer my old crossmax ceramic rims with nice new ceramic brake pads and my avid SD5 brakes over a disc setup, because they work better, stop better, are lighter, less hassels, etc.

I you do x-country racing and use v-brakes then you'll know disc brakes are good for skidding that's about it, they have no feel and they certainly don't help you stop faster.

derby said:
Actually ceramic rims brake worse than aluminum after they break in and polish smooth after a year or so, especially when wet (no brakes!). They do brake a little better while near new.

But they do lengthen rim life if they don't chip in less time.

They are better suited for road use.

Disc brakes are far better.

- ray
 

·
www.derbyrims.com
Joined
·
6,766 Posts
mtb_biker said:
Not sure what ceramic rims you were using but I never had those problems with mine ever. They work excellent in XC condtions. They make blocks to clean the ceramic surface. In my expereince with racing, ceramic brakes are a big advantage f you're not running discs. I"m not really sure how long you used ceramic brakes but they work as advertised with proper maintanace.

I use discs so no need to try and re-hash up a Disc vs. Vbrake battle. I've used them both and i was just answering his question. If ceramic v-brakes were so "inferior" then you'd think crossmax's wouldn't be ceramic as well as alot of other top wheelsets.
A light weight racer type or more occasional rider may never break in ceramic rims to the high polish finish which brakes so poorly. I'm near 200 lbs. and climb (and brake downhill) a lot, so I broke them in to be like polished porcelain within a year if they didn't chip first. They did brake better than aluminum for the first few months.

I did about 6 years of ceramic rims before my upgrade to disc in 2000. I used Mavic :thumbsup: mostly and tried a few Bontrager wheels with ceramic rims (crap wheels back then, hopefully improved by now). I used to wear out Mavic aluminum rims with rim brakes in one year, ceramics would last 2 or 3 if they didnt chip first.

The main thing I liked about ceramic over aluminum was I could use more abrasive (ceramic) pads than aluminum wheels to keep the rims clean and squeal-free. I preferred green Koolstops and duel compound 50/50 (ceramic/normal) orange/black compound WTB (made by Koolstop) pads, Shimano ceramic pads were harder and were worse braking. The abrasive ceramic pads cleaned and prevented rubber build up and the resulting brake squeal which I often had problems with using Mavic SUP rims.

I think there are ceramic disc brakes available now too, but I don't remember where I saw them.

:cool:

- ray
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48,238 Posts
derby said:
...The main thing I liked about ceramic over aluminum was I could use more abrasive (ceramic) pads than aluminum wheels to keep the rims clean and squeal-free. I preferred green Koolstops and duel compound 50/50 (ceramic/normal) orange/black compound WTB (made by Koolstop) pads, Shimano ceramic pads were harder and were worse braking. The abrasive ceramic pads cleaned and prevented rubber build up and the resulting brake squeal which I often had problems with using Mavic SUP rims...

- ray
"Could use"ceramic pads? More like must use ceramic pads. If you don't the braking is not nearly as effective and you have the rubber build up and squealing you mentioned.
 

·
www.derbyrims.com
Joined
·
6,766 Posts
Tried duel compound pads on alu rims

shiggy said:
"Could use"ceramic pads? More like must use ceramic pads. If you don't the braking is not nearly as effective and you have the rubber build up and squealing you mentioned.
WTB markets (or did 10 years ago) the duel compound orange (ceramic) plus black (normal rubber) pads as "extreme use" pads, not ceramic only. Actually with aluminum rims they had worse braking power than all black or red pads. But they were the only pads I could use that were self-cleaning and didn't build up rubber on the rim. But then aluminum rims wore out quickly. And so I went to ceramic... and was impressed at first by the improved power ... until they polished out and were worse, not a whole lot worse, but certainly no better than aluminum rim braking power after about 6 months of use. And worse braking than aluminum when wet, non-existent. In the rain with new ceramic rims I was able to grind up a new set of ceramic pads in one ride, at least the rims didn't grind up too like aluminum did in the rain. I probably should have used those duel compound pads on my ceramic rims but they cost almost 3 times as much as Koolstop ceramic pads.

My weight and long downhills after much climbing really heat up my brakes. With aluminum rims I couldn't run red pads for more than a quarter mile without rubber build up and squealing. Blacks would last a few rides, then I had to clean them with scotch bright. This seemed to occur on the higher end lighter aluminum wheels. I don't recall having this squeal problem in my earlier mountain bike days. Maybe the more powerful v-brakes were the difference, although I made my early canti's nearly as powerful.

Oh to be an average size rider!

:rolleyes:

- ray
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top