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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking around for a decent centerstand for my Big Dummy, and haven't found one that really does what I need. So I went looking for a basic kickstand, and I found something interesting. I've never owned a bike with a kickstand before, so maybe some of you are aware of these but I certainly wasn't.

There is a centerstand made by Esge that folds up like a normal kickstand. When its in the down position (deployed?), there are two legs supporting the load, but due to a cam mechanism it stows much like a normal kickstand with the two legs stacked on top of each other. Here the centerstand is up:



And here it is in the down position:



Since this part was designed with a more conventional bicycle in mind, a few easy modifications were needed to make it work. There's a metal spacer that came with the stand that interfered with the BD's frame, so it needed to be trimmed with a hacksaw. And the securing bolt goes into a blind hole and the bolt is too long, so the bolt bottoms out before proper clamp load is achieved. Again, the hacksaw is your friend. And you may need to clean up the bolt's threads with a die or thread chaser depending on how messy you were when you cut it. Here's a pic to show what was needed:



And here's a pic of the stand installed, from an overhead view. Hopefully this will illustrate why the spacer needed to be cut on the left side:



And don't forget to put Loctite on the bolt threads, and trim the length of the centerstand legs to suit your needs. I trimmed off a bunch and still my rear wheel is in the air when up on the stand. That means it takes a bit more work to raise and lower the bike when loaded, but it also means I can lube the chain and adjust the derailleurs without the need for a workstand.

Its not perfect, because the centerstand is offset to left side of the bike (because that's where surly put the mounting location) and its also not perfectly centered along the length of the bike. So this means you still have to load the left side of the bike first, and also when you start loading it up the front wheel pops up a bit, but this is fairly minor in my opinion. I think its a good work-around until a "real" centerstand comes to market. And you can always just lay the bike on its side like Devo, if you prefer.

Hope this helps somebody looking for a solution.

PS. I think this was ~$50 at my local shop.
 
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i like it.

this is the first post i've seen using that kick stand. i've been curious to see how it would work out. the $50 deal... thats a ton of money for a kick stand, but i can see how my perception could change, and that kickstand gets nothing but good reviews.

fairly recently, when i was in Big Sur, i met a guy from London, who was riding a Koga World Traveler.

it has a FRONT KICKSTAND!
http://www.futurecycles.org/index.p...n=com_virtuemart&Itemid=91&vmcchk=1&Itemid=91
i thought that was a pretty good idea.

i've also seen kickstands for BOB trailers
http://www.biketrailershop.com/catalog/260-greenfield-stabalizer-kickstandfor-bob-trailer-p-113.html
and have wondered if there was a way to re-orient the mounting bracket, and find a spot on the NON-drive side, to put a 2nd kick stand. or perhaps 2 of these kick stands could find symmetrical spots on the BD. only if the mount/kickstand could be re-oriented.

or these from Tranz-X... http://www.bikemannetwork.com/biking/c/ACKICK
i wonder if they could be mounted on both sides of the BD... maybe somewhere close to the back... behind the axel
 

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it seems to me The Kickstand gig with the Dummy begs to be addressed. i know I break them all the time... its a drag.

the Koga kickstand was way cool, cuz its adjustable, and it mounted to the bottom of the front pannier, a Tubus i think it was.

as i learned from Fred of London, i thought it was "the dog's bollocks"... meaning the best. if its just "bollocks" thats the worst, its...

i think someone needs to come out with a frame mount, adjustable, multi-oriented kickstand.

if the dummy had 4 kickstands, 2 rear & 2 of those Koga types for the panniers... then it would be a done deal.

maybe a brake lever that lets you lock the brakes.

d-
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, I've seen that red one before. It looks fairly well executed, but pricey. It looks like you're paying for all the labor involved. It doesn't look too hard to fab up something similar.

But I'm not feeling the 4 kickstand idea. It might be stable, but that's 3 extra steps as far as I'm concerned. And I frequently lock my bike up at crowded bike racks, so I don't always have extra room on both sides of the bike to extend all the kickstands. I personally like the integrated centerstands that the dutch bikes use, which is similar to what Mclovin posted above.

As to the brake lock idea, I have been thinking about the same thing. Since my primary brakes are hydraulic discs, I was thinking of mounting V-brakes (but no levers on the bars) and figuring out a way to lock them on for security while parked.

Another idea is to use something like this from the motorcycle industry:



I've seen metal ones as well. Someone could still steal your bike, but it would slow them down.
 
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i agree, the 4 kickstand deal, is ridiculous... too many steps, etc.

i park my dummy with bikes too, bike racks,etc..

i use Avid mech's, and simply dial in the outboard adjuster knob on the front brake...
but sometimes its difficult to access the dial, i.e. when panniers are full.

i had also seen that red kickstand before.

Xtracycle offers the "rock sturdy" kickstand...
which utilizes the holes in the frame for the WideLoaders...

perhaps some kind of torsional spring system, on a long axel, with kickstand legs that bolt on, via a spline pattern, would work... kind of like a garage door.... wind up spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was referring to the brake lock for security purposes. Now that I re-read Devo's post, I think he was talking about locking the brake to aid in stability. In that case the cheaper rubber band or strip of inner tube would make a lot more sense.
 

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Just to give this thread a bit of an update, the stand pictured in the third post (way back there) was an early version of the Rolling Jackass centerstand, and details of the current (greatly improved) version can be seen at www.rollingjackass.com For what it's worth, my favorite brake lock for purposes of stability (and security, as long as you're dealing with clueless goofballs, which is ususlly the case) is a toe clip strap. Mighty handy little items, those are, even if you don't have toe clips. Cheers!
 

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Val Kleitz said:
Just to give this thread a bit of an update, the stand pictured in the third post (way back there) was an early version of the Rolling Jackass centerstand, and details of the current (greatly improved) version can be seen at www.rollingjackass.com For what it's worth, my favorite brake lock for purposes of stability (and security, as long as you're dealing with clueless goofballs, which is ususlly the case) is a toe clip strap. Mighty handy little items, those are, even if you don't have toe clips. Cheers!
Anyone who spends $350 on a kickstand ought to have their head examined.
 

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superjohnny: You may be right, but I have also heard it said that anyone who would spend over $300.00 on a bicycle should have their head examined. Then we have those who would spend $1200.00 on a rear hub for a bicycle, not to mention $150.00 for a headset or $250.00 for a crankset. It is, of course, possible to build your own cargo bike out of left over frames and found parts, and many of these are quite functional. Not everyone wants to do that. The Rolling Jackass stand is intended to last the life of the bicycle, be easy to install, use and maintain, and to hold loads of up to 350 lbs stable while the rider mounts and dismounts. For those who do not need this, it is excessive. For those who do need that sort of thing, it is worth checking out. It may seem hard to believe, but so far, no one has regretted getting one. I can't imagine riding my Xtracycle without it; it really does make that much of a difference.
 

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Still doesn't make sense to drop 350 when you can get the same thing for around 150, especially considering the cheaper one is much less kludged up.
 

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I have the KickBack on my Dummy and it's indispensable. It's worth every penny even at the full price of $139 and should be the first accessory purchased for the DB, IMO.

pigeonfarmboy said:
I'm new to all this but when I was ordering my xtracycle stuff I went ahead and got what looks like a great solution to a center stand. Surprised it wasn't mentioned so far. (too new I assume)

Xtracycle KickBack
http://store.xtracycle.com/_e/Xtracycle_Accessories/product/KS-KB/KickBack.htm
 

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ScaryJerry: You're right, it wouldn't make any sense if you were getting the same thing, but that is not the case. Let me say first off that I dearly love the staff and the vision of Xtracycle, and I am very glad that they are finally making a stand of this type, at a very reasonable price. The reason that I am making them too is that I have been making stands for the Xtracycle for the last six years, since they had not gotten around to it during that time, and at this point I believe that mine is, in many ways, better. To enumerate:
-The Rolling Jackass stand is based on a true over center mechanism. What this means is that when you pick the bike up, the stand remains in place. This may not seem like a big deal, but it can save a lot of time and trouble when working on the rear wheel, or even just when moving the bike in a garage.
-The main pivot on the RJ consists of a 3/8" stainless shaft running through a chromoly tube, with a lube port. It is protected from the majority of the wheel splash by the body of the stand, and should only require lubrication at very rare intervals. By contrast, the Kickback pivot uses plastic bushings over aluminum tubes - not a bad system, just not as sturdy or servicable.
-The RJ is made in Seattle in a bicycle oriented fabrication shop ( http://www.haulincolin.com/index.html ). To many, this is not a consideration, and I know that the factories where Xtracycle products are made have been thoroughly checked out for fair labor practices and responsible manufacturing, but it is important to some to buy more locally. This also means that we can make imporovements (if we find any more to make) and produce small batches in non standard colors, if the demand arises.
- The RJ is actuated by a remote lever on the handlebars, so that the bike can be securely set onto the stand before you need to swing a leg over it. In many circumstances, this is not necessary, but if you have ever arrived with a Big Dummy or Xtracycle fully loaded with groceries and two kids on the back, you will understand why it is worth it. You stop, put both feet on the ground, set the bike on the stand, and then get off, while the bike sits still. The added security and safety should not be underestimated.
As far as it being a kludge is concerned, the Rolling Jackass stand has been developed over six years of continuous prototyping, improvement and abusive testing. It is stable, sturdy, easy to use, easy to install, and practically impervious to the weather. If all those qualities fit within your definition of a "kludge", then, cool, that must be what it is. Somehow I had thought that the word had a slightly different meaning.
Anthony: I fully agree with you about the necessity of a centerstand for any serious cargo bike. I built my first one before I even had the bike assembled, because I knew I would need it. It's good that folks who need one have more than one option, yes?
Cheers!
 

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Yes, I agree, it's nice to have choices..

Val Kleitz said:
....
Anthony: I fully agree with you about the necessity of a centerstand for any serious cargo bike. I built my first one before I even had the bike assembled, because I knew I would need it. It's good that folks who need one have more than one option, yes?
Cheers!
 
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