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carpe mañana
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would anyone be kind enough to enlighten me with dimensions of the cassette carrier (shimano), the width and the od of the splines and between the splines? Thanks!

_MK
 

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Huh?

Way Too much work.
I think all you need to know is the following two facts:

Shimano = slop & a prematurely worn out freehub body.
SRAM = perfection & a long lasting freehub body.
 
G

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i disagree with the previous post in that a properly spaced and tightened cassete is not going to cause any damage.

HOWEVER...

the new SRAM cassette with the red spider is pretty trick looking. :)
 

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Disagree all you want...then perform the following test:

Take a new Shimano compatible cassette hub off the shelf.

Grab a brand new Shimano XT or XTR cassette (just the carrier part with the cogs attached).Slide it down over the hubs cassette body. Now grip it with your hand & move it in a parallel orbital rotation. Notice the play? Ridiculous huh?

Now do the same test with an SRAM cassette. Slide it down over that Shimano comapatible cassette body & try to give it the same parallel orbital rotation. Where did the play go? :rolleyes:

Choose & spend your hard earned dollars wisely.
 

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carpe mañana
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't care to know your cassette preferences. I would like to learn the dimensions of the hub so that I can machine myself some spacers for a single speed conversion.

_MK
 

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Old man on a bike
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So you want the measurements of a Shimano freehub body, or a Shimano cassette carrier?
 

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carpe mañana
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bikinfoolferlife said:
So you want the measurements of a Shimano freehub body, or a Shimano cassette carrier?
The piece of the hub onto which you slide the cassette, King calls it drive shell, but in their terms it includes the engagement teeth and a bearing. I assumed it is called a cassette carrier.

_MK
 

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meh....
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MK_ said:
The piece of the hub onto which you slide the cassette, King calls it drive shell, but in their terms it includes the engagement teeth and a bearing. I assumed it is called a cassette carrier.

_MK
Here's the ID of a spacer from a King SS hub, 34.75mm, or 1.368"

Monte
 

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carpe mañana
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Monte said:
Here's the ID of a spacer from a King SS hub, 34.75mm, or 1.368"

Monte
Thanks.

_MK
 

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Bringing this thread back from the dead because it was the only one I found to deal with this issue. I found some tubing from which I could cut spacers, so that's all gravy, BUT...the OP's question is more detailed, and I too would like the answer.

Where can I find engineering drawings of a shimano-compatible freehub body? If for example, I wanted to have cogs made, or spacers that fit the splines.
Thanks!
 

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Vaginatarian
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Elzippo said:
Disagree all you want...then perform the following test:

Take a new Shimano compatible cassette hub off the shelf.

Grab a brand new Shimano XT or XTR cassette (just the carrier part with the cogs attached).Slide it down over the hubs cassette body. Now grip it with your hand & move it in a parallel orbital rotation. Notice the play? Ridiculous huh?

Now do the same test with an SRAM cassette. Slide it down over that Shimano comapatible cassette body & try to give it the same parallel orbital rotation. Where did the play go? :rolleyes:

Choose & spend your hard earned dollars wisely.
perfection?
my last sram990 had a burr on the third cog so it wouldnt even go on the freehub, after filing it finally went on , then 4 rides later the 2 largest cogs were bent so badly that the chain wouldnt stay on them. they warrantied it but I wouldnt say perfection

no play on my I9 hubs, although the Sram aluminum spider is easier on the freehub body than a steel carrier
 

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mostly because I assume there's a reference diagram, "standard" as this is...

and secondly, because I don't want to be plagued by cumulative error, of the original machining, of damages/distortions from use, my measurements, and then the machining I have done based on said measurements.

It would be better to have an original spec, ideally from Shimano (who don't reply to e-mails)
 
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