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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, I'm curious what a reasonable weight to shoot for would be. I asked the same question on another thread about my brakes but didn't get a response. Its a 26" full rigid 1x10 and weighs just under 23lbs. What's a good weight for this kind of MTB?

Second, it's been about a year since I built my bike and still loving it, so thought I would lighten it a bit to make it even easier to ride. For this year I want to replace the fork, stem and handlebars since they are the heavy parts. I'm just a casual rider and as such don't have a circle of MTB friends or stay in the loop on parts, etc. So I was wondering what I should use for replacements. Thanks in advance for any help!

Stem:
Profile Design Boa Threadless Mountain Stems are constructed of 6061-T6 aluminum.
Threadless 6061-T6
50mm Height
185-277 Grams
Item Specifications
Color Silver
Weight 277g
Intended Use Mountain
Bar Clamp Diameter 25.4mm
Stem Angle 130deg
Stem Length 90mm
Steerer Tube 1-1/8" Threadless
Defined Color Silver
S.H.I.S. Clamp Diameter 28.6

Fork:
Nashbar Rigid Mountain Bike Fork lets you rediscover the simplicity of riding a rigid fork. Our beefy 4130 chromoly fork features 31.8mm fork legs, tapered for a superb ride quality IS disc mount and removable V-brake studs allow you to build it up however you want Extra clearance for 3.0 tires with room for mud, and single eyelets at the dropout for full fenders Suspension corrected leg length means your bike's handling won't change 45mm offset Axle to Crown: 453mm Steerer length: 280mm

Handlebar:
Sunlite Swedged MTB Flat Bar - 610mm x 25.4mm, 6-Degree Bend, Silver
 

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A rigid geared hardtail could be under 16 pounds if you really tried. But the frame and wheels are where you likely have the most weight, followed by the fork. Shaving off 100gms on cockpit pieces won't be as noticeable as shaving weight off the wheels.

Take a look at the tires you're running, if they are wire bead then even just switching them to a folding bead version of the same tire will save you 100gms where it matters. If you look for some lighter tires yet, you could likely take 1/2 a pound or more off the bike. Not as blingy, but you'll feel the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A rigid geared hardtail could be under 16 pounds if you really tried. But the frame and wheels are where you likely have the most weight, followed by the fork. Shaving off 100gms on cockpit pieces won't be as noticeable as shaving weight off the wheels.

Take a look at the tires you're running, if they are wire bead then even just switching them to a folding bead version of the same tire will save you 100gms where it matters. If you look for some lighter tires yet, you could likely take 1/2 a pound or more off the bike. Not as blingy, but you'll feel the difference.
Wow, I would loves 16lb mtb!

Tires are schwalbe nobby nic evo 2.35 and rocket ron 2.1. Looking around I couldn't find anything much lighter without being narrower or less grip. Inner tubes aren't light, but I got tired of blowing out the light ones.

Wheels are velocity blunt sl and aeroheat. Would lighter wheels save more weight than fork, etc? I was thinking a good fork alone could shave a pound.
 

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You'll feel the weight savings in rotating mass like wheels and tires before you will in a fork, but changing to a rigid carbon fork will save you some weight and reduce vibration and tire knob buzz. So you'll feel more difference from an improvement in comfort than you would in the weight.

What frame are you riding? Was it intended for a suspension fork or for a rigid fork?

If you want a major improvement in ride comfort, a carbon seatpost, a set of carbon bars and a carbon fork will do that while saving some weight. You'll almost certainly need to be changing your stem at the same time as it is more difficult to find any choice in a 25.4mm carbon bar, 31.8mm has become the new normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You'll feel the weight savings in rotating mass like wheels and tires before you will in a fork, but changing to a rigid carbon fork will save you some weight and reduce vibration and tire knob buzz. So you'll feel more difference from an improvement in comfort than you would in the weight.

What frame are you riding? Was it intended for a suspension fork or for a rigid fork?

If you want a major improvement in ride comfort, a carbon seatpost, a set of carbon bars and a carbon fork will do that while saving some weight. You'll almost certainly need to be changing your stem at the same time as it is more difficult to find any choice in a 25.4mm carbon bar, 31.8mm has become the new normal.
Thanks for the info! A smoother ride does sound nice. That's why I used that super wide front wheel. When I gave my wife my hardtail, I didn't miss the suspension at all.

Also, if it makes any difference, I'm only 140lbs. Noticed the carbon fork in that link has a max rider weight of 235. Would that be overkill for me?

Frame is this 16" Kinesis kinesium...

New Kinesis Aluminum Unbranded 26" Mtn Bike Frame Light | eBay

Been a year, but if I remember correctly, it was designed for 80 or 100mm suspension fork, but I like the geometry of the fork on there now so want to stick with similar, just lighter. It came painted black, but I stripped it and ground off anything unnecessary, like some of the cable holders, cani/rim brake bosses and drilled out the water bottle bosses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My advice would be to get a carbon fork, as you will feel a huge difference up front. Then a better/lighter wheelset. Then a new stem/handlebar.
So I can just reuse the stem and handlebar on the carbon fork for now? And there's one chip in the paint on my current fork from a rock I assume. Do carbon forks put up with stuff like that?
 

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Don't waste your time with those other heavy front forks. If you are running V brakes, get one of these:

2013 New Trigon MTB 3K Full Carbon Rigid Fork Disc V Brake Compatible MC01 | eBay

If you're disc only, get this one:

2013 New Trigon MTB 3K Full Carbon Rigid Fork Disc Only Use MC01A | eBay

I have one of each, and the one with the V brakes bosses has about 7 years and nearly 15,000 miles on it. The other one has 3-4 years and about 3-4,000 miles. Neither one shows any signs of any kind of structural damage, only a few cosmetic blemishes. I also bought one for a buddy. All 3 of them came from Taiwan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Don't waste your time with those other heavy front forks. If you are running V brakes, get one of these:

2013 New Trigon MTB 3K Full Carbon Rigid Fork Disc V Brake Compatible MC01 | eBay

If you're disc only, get this one:

2013 New Trigon MTB 3K Full Carbon Rigid Fork Disc Only Use MC01A | eBay

I have one of each, and the one with the V brakes bosses has about 7 years and nearly 15,000 miles on it. The other one has 3-4 years and about 3-4,000 miles. Neither one shows any signs of any kind of structural damage, only a few cosmetic blemishes. I also bought one for a buddy. All 3 of them came from Taiwan.

Thanks! I checked out some reviews and seems it should be great for the tame riding I do. I bought the 2014 TRIGON 26" MTB DISC Full Carbon RIGID MC01A Fork off EBAY but am confused about a couple things...

1) Can I swap and reuse my Cane Creek Forty headset on the carbon steerer?

2) Can I use my current stem on the carbon steerer?

Thanks for all the help guys!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also, my math says the fork will shave 2.142lbs of the bike at a cost of $99.2/lb. is that cost effective compared to weight savings in other areas?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Threw the Trigon fork on the bike today. Under 20lbs now and center of gravity shifted back somehow makes it feel easier to ride.

Only issue is tire clearance. About 1/8" on either side. Appears that the fork is designed for better clearance on 29" tires.

Taking it out on the trail tomorrow to see how it does.
 
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