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Question for folks more versed in carbon fiber technology.

As frame builders integrate more flex in the frame design to aid in suspension and trail compliance, how does that effect the life of the frame or frame parts, such as chainstays?

I know carbon products has a long working life, so long as fibers and epoxy never cracks or gets damaged. How do they integrate flex points without compromising the epoxy and/or fibers? I would imagine over time, something would give.

Take modern day hockey sticks for example. When I get a new stick, I know there is a limited working life of the stick before it looses it's snap and feel (provided it doesn't get damaged or broken from game use). I know they build in flex points in the stick and I know every time I take a heavy shot (putting alot of load and flex into the stick), it compromises the stick and with time and use, the stick becomes "noodlely" and gets regulated as a practice sticks.

Would this apply to areas like chainstays or other components in the bike frame with integrated flex points?
 

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Are you concerned about the service life of carbon frame?

Perhaps if this were an issue, some OEM's wouldn't offer lifetime warranties.
 

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sample size of 1, but my lahar dh bike (that i've had since 2007) uses a flex stay swingarm (with a relatively large degree of flex) and has withstood a decade of hard use (countless whistler bikepark laps), and is still intact (though only gets pulled out for an annual retro rip these days). of course, build quality / design may vary wildly, but i've no doubt that carbon has the potential to be utilized in similar flex applications successfully.

19.jpg
 

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...

As frame builders integrate more flex in the frame design to aid in suspension ...
...
Would this apply to areas like chainstays or other components in the bike frame with integrated flex points?
Is this really true?

I've heard of this design philosophy in hardtails and road frames, but not full sus.

I think they may compensate for vibration damping, but I have not heard of allowing "flex" per se.

-F
 
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