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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a questions that I also posted in the "Save some weight" forum

. I have been riding my Trek 4900 and my GT RTS-2 to try and shed pounds, get into shape, and build endurance in my legs for Snowboarding.

I want to get a Kona Hoss Dee-Lux ASAP, but I started thinking of another type of bike too.

My question is, Can a Super Clydesdale like me 6'5" 350lbs, buy a used Trek 9.8 or 9.9 Style Mountain bike, if all I really will use it for is XC Pavement/Concrete riding?

I live in San Diego, and work is LaJolla. Everywhere you go or look, there are hills everywhere. This is where most of my workout comes from is climbing these steep hills on pavement.

Would a carbon frame hold up over time if this is the only style of riding I use it for?
 

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Possibly. I would skip it for several reasons. 1) If you fall and damage the frame, it cannot be fixed, 2) the frame will have no warrantee. Stick with metal.
 

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Adam_Reiter said:
I have a questions that I also posted in the "Save some weight" forum

. I have been riding my Trek 4900 and my GT RTS-2 to try and shed pounds, get into shape, and build endurance in my legs for Snowboarding.

I want to get a Kona Hoss Dee-Lux ASAP, but I started thinking of another type of bike too.

My question is, Can a Super Clydesdale like me 6'5" 350lbs, buy a used Trek 9.8 or 9.9 Style Mountain bike, if all I really will use it for is XC Pavement/Concrete riding?

I live in San Diego, and work is LaJolla. Everywhere you go or look, there are hills everywhere. This is where most of my workout comes from is climbing these steep hills on pavement.

Would a carbon frame hold up over time if this is the only style of riding I use it for?
man, im 6ft 2in and 250 lbs and ive been told to stay away from cf bikes. you've got me by 100 lbs so i dont think ita a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
edouble said:
man, im 6ft 2in and 250 lbs and ive been told to stay away from cf bikes. you've got me by 100 lbs so i dont think ita a good idea.
Well, I completely understand that for regular mountain biking and riding trails, but it the bike is used specifically for road riding, is it ok?

I plan on dropping weight as the diet and exercise go on and on. So I wont be here at 350 lbsfor too long I dont hope. I was literally 269 lbs like 3-4 years ago, so I am hoping it comes off rather quickly.
 

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Not to rain on your parade but it is a lot easier to put the weight on than lose it (this is comming from someone who constantly fighting their weight). I would suggest that you keep riding your Trek 4500 and buy yourself that nice light carbon race bike a reward when you hit 250 pounds. Take the money you spend on junk food and put in in a jar for money toward the bike.
 

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CF For a Goliath

A Trek 9.8 should be fine for you on the terrain you are going to be riding. I am 6'4" 330 Lbs. I have ridden the 9.8 and it feels like a toy. Bottom line - with anyone over 250 Lbs. CALL THE MANUFACTURER and talk to the tech geeks - you would be surprised how many companies have data/ info that can help you. Doing your research before parting with your cash is essential. I spoke with many bike companies before buying a new FS bike from Banshee (actualy had 3 other bike companies tell me to go there for my new bike!) Here's an example: I found that Kona, Foes, Yeti, et. al. spec their bikes to 250 LB riders MAX. There are some out there that spec them to less than that and others that have no data (yikes!). There are other companies out there that can share experience of riders weighing more, so again, pick up the phone and call...

I have a Surly Instigator HT now. This is my third riding season with the frame and I have had no problems what so ever. The frame is built well, handles the abuse of a big rider on rough terrain, and is quite inexpensive (~390.00 for the frame MSRP). Great job SURLY!

I also have a Banshee Chaparral as my FS XC bike - it's built better than most DH bikes I've seen. I have been nothing but happy with it and the experience of talking to the gang at Banshee to get the right bike/parts.
 

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Bike Paths... The Gateway Drug

:D
Adam_Reiter said:
Well, I completely understand that for regular mountain biking and riding trails, but it the bike is used specifically for road riding, is it ok?

I plan on dropping weight as the diet and exercise go on and on. So I wont be here at 350 lbsfor too long I dont hope. I was literally 269 lbs like 3-4 years ago, so I am hoping it comes off rather quickly.
Can't speak for anyone else here, but I got into this innocently enough 6 years ago, riding bike paths & commuting trying to lose a little weight & burn off tension when I quit smoking. I ended up a craven, drooling singletrack addict.

If you find yourself starting to get hooked, your tires will start heading for dirt, and then rocks, and then BIG rocks. You don't have to plan it... It just happens. Seen perfectly sensible people turn into dirt junkies in a matter of months.

If this happens to you, anything carbon you ride off road will be a safety hazard. Plan ahead and buy something that won't break on you. A nice steel frame will have a ride quality just as good or better than carbon, and costs way less. If you have a bunch of money burning a hole in your pocket, have a builder custom-make a steel or titanium hardtail for you. It will make other riders green with envy, and will last a long, long time.
 

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Scabby Elbowz said:
:D
A nice steel frame will have a ride quality just as good or better than carbon, and costs way less. If you have a bunch of money burning a hole in your pocket, have a builder custom-make a steel or titanium hardtail for you. It will make other riders green with envy, and will last a long, long time.
I agree with steel or Ti, but only if you admit that it should not be a light frame. You can get custom builders to make it stronger. I have owned 5 or 6 lightweight steel frames that all broke like the wind, and my current custom Ti is the only mountain bike that has survived me for more than two years.

You will get more of what you need with a custom bike then with a bike designed for the 180lb average joe.
 

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TobyNobody said:
I agree with steel or Ti, but only if you admit that it should not be a light frame. You can get custom builders to make it stronger. I have owned 5 or 6 lightweight steel frames that all broke like the wind, and my current custom Ti is the only mountain bike that has survived me for more than two years.

You will get more of what you need with a custom bike then with a bike designed for the 180lb average joe.
Agreed; I was thinking something along the lines of a Steelhead or Instigator for an 'off-the-rack' frame.

I am also properly green with envy over your custom ride. Got any pictures I can drool on?
 
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