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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wasn't sure what forum to post this to, but..

I just received my new Easton Monkeylite XC bars and am not impressed with the looks of it. There are clearly seams visible. It looks like it was molded together from 4 pieces.
I't feels smooth and I'm sure it's just cosmetic but was wondering if that's just the way Easton's handlebars(made in China) are?:???:

Also, received today are my WB Rock Solid Carbon forks that are going on my GF Rig as well. Those...very, very pretty!!

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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mtnbiker72 said:
Most carbon fiber parts (and frames) have a "cosmetic" weave under the clearcoat. It's generally not the actual fiber weave used. I'm wondering if Easton has ditched the cosmetics?
Yep, Easton doesn't do the cosmetic layer on its CNT stuff... what you see is the actual structural carbon fiber.

There are some other places where you can see this too. Carbon steerer tubes come to mind, as do chainstays on the Gary Fisher HiFi.
 

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Easton and other companies have ditched the carbon weave for the fact that all it does is make the bar or other component cosmetically attractive. Some companies makes some of their higher end bikes like this, I know Specialized does. The reason they have ditched it, is because all it does is add weight. I personally like the look of the raw carbon.
 

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pedal pusher
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I like it raw...

Whether aluminum, ti or carbon, I've always preferred the look of the raw material. The cosmetic layer on carbon does look pretty awesome, but there's just something about the bare material that lets you know it's about riding, not for show. About the only cosmetic touch that I like is anodization, and only because I can still see the lines of the metal through it.
 

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wanna dance?
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The "cosmetic" weave should not be misconstrued as "Cosmetic Only". You might be surprised to find how many bikes are out there on the road with 15+ years of use, made of nothing but the stuff. It was used for a long time as an abrasion resistant outer layer as well, ie, stem clamps. However, it makes for a more expensive product in several ways, and if Easton figures they can sell bars without it, they'll make more $ by forgoing it.
 
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